Some newbie questions

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BigPapaBear
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Some newbie questions

Post by BigPapaBear » Wed Jan 08, 2020 11:02 am

Hi all!

I am an experienced musician, but I am quite new to the world on synths and analog synthesis. I was hoping that you could help me with a few newbie questions, that hopefully aren’t too stupid.

1. If I have a controller with both USB and standard midi ports, can I use both simultaneously or does one output cut the other?

2. If I have a CV out that is 10V and I patch it to a CV in that wants 5V will I fry the receiving end, or is it harmless? Will it cause any other problems?

3. Can “the average sequencer” handle odd time signatures? I.e. if I want a pattern in 7/8 or something like that. Most videos online always use all 16 steps.

4. Most sequencer videos I’ve looked at online seem to be very “rigid” – only playing one type of notes (1/4, 1/8 etc) at a time. Is there a way to use a sequencer that mixes different note lengths? Would this affect the number of steps available? I.e. would it require that every step is 1/16 notes and that I have to use 4 steps to create a 1/4 note?

5. Do you have any tips for a controller with full size keys and a sequencer that can handle 64+ steps (preferably that can also handle odd time signatures)? Or a sequencer without keys, that I can enter data into by playing on another keyboard.

Thank you in advance.

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ItsMeOnly
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Re: Some newbie questions

Post by ItsMeOnly » Wed Jan 08, 2020 1:37 pm

BigPapaBear wrote:
Wed Jan 08, 2020 11:02 am
1. If I have a controller with both USB and standard midi ports, can I use both simultaneously or does one output cut the other?
That solely depends on controller (you haven't told us what you have).
2. If I have a CV out that is 10V and I patch it to a CV in that wants 5V will I fry the receiving end, or is it harmless? Will it cause any other problems?
Again: what do you patch in and to what - in most of cases that non matched CV will make controlled parameter behave oddly (e.g. pitch), but some control voltages shouldn't be overloaded.
3. Can “the average sequencer” handle odd time signatures? I.e. if I want a pattern in 7/8 or something like that. Most videos online always use all 16 steps.
Hardware? Software? For example Cubase handles odd time signatures just fine (in fact they say it's "for you, prog-prock freaks").

But judging from your followup questions, you mean step sequencers for sure. I know for a fact, that you can assign number of steps in Korgs *logues, Roland Fantom/FA. As for resolution, you can set step division most of the time. As for the length - that's what "gate" parameter is for, you can usually set it to time, or signature.

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Weirdofromouterspace
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Re: Some newbie questions

Post by Weirdofromouterspace » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:53 am

BigPapaBear wrote:
Wed Jan 08, 2020 11:02 am
4. Most sequencer videos I’ve looked at online seem to be very “rigid” – only playing one type of notes (1/4, 1/8 etc) at a time. Is there a way to use a sequencer that mixes different note lengths? Would this affect the number of steps available? I.e. would it require that every step is 1/16 notes and that I have to use 4 steps to create a 1/4 note?
Yes, this is rather common in step sequencers, and if you add 1/16 notes in a 16 step sequence, you will only have 4/4 available until the entire sequence is full.

However, there are sequencers such as the (vintage) Kawai Q-80 where you can program every single note as is. Takes a while though, and they are far less suitable for quick editing. Rather think of them as "I program my song, and then let it play like a piano roll".
Don't forget to TURN ON THE SYNTHESIZER. Often this is the reason why you get no sound out of it. - ARP 2600 manual, 1971

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