Behringer's clone army

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ZeeOne
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Behringer's clone army

Post by ZeeOne » Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:57 am

How does this community (and for those with contacts in the vintage synthesizer community, as a whole) feel about Behringer's vintage clones? They've got an Odyssey, a Roland VP-330, a few different Moogs...I saw over on Gearslutz ( :lol: ) that they've got a Solina in the works as well as patent filings for Logan, Trident, Quadra (!!!), Polivoks, freaking SYNTHEX, and more Moog names like Prodigy and Source. Do you feel they're sacrilege, cheap knockoffs that devalue the originals, or is a great inexpensive alternative for those who want the sound and 95% of the feel (even less in the case of models that are desktop only) of the originals while bringing down the cost of them for those who have to have the real thing? Personally, I'm quite looking forward to the UB-Xa, given that the $4000+ an Oberheim OB-Xa is far more money than I can justify for a secondary instrument.

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Re: Behringer's clone army

Post by D-Collector » Thu Jun 11, 2020 11:02 am

When I signed up here in 2006, and for many years before and after, there were continuous outcries for Roland and the other famous companies to remake their old instruments, with cheap prices. Thread after thread complaining about the prices of vintage gear, and wishing for a company to do exactly what Behringer has been doing these last couple of years. To make affordable replicas of the famous synths we adore. I felt the same way.

If the general opinion now is that Behringer products are sacrilege, it is pure hypocrasy. I think that has more to do with a deep rooted attitude towards Behringer.

Much like the salesman at my local music shop in the middle 2000s. I was in the market for a cheap mixer and the guy kept talking down Behringer, more or less calling it s**t. The same guy is an analoguesystems freak, which is fine. He of course wanted me to buy the expensive Yamaha ones. I ended up buying several Behringer mixers, both desktop and rack units, and was very pleased with them both in terms of sound and quality.

I do not currently own any Behringer product, but I am extremely excited about their recent releases. To have the possibility to buy a 808 and 303 for cheap, big size and original styling, should be a dream come true for many. I'm holding out for the DMX or LinnDrum clone.

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meatballfulton
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Re: Behringer's clone army

Post by meatballfulton » Thu Jun 11, 2020 3:13 pm

Ten years ago I was arguing it would be impossible to start making reissues of the old classics at reasonable prices. I was totally wrong.

Behringer is a dream come true for people who want vintage synths but can't afford to buy one, refurbish it, add MIDI, etc. I've given up worrying about their ethical behavior.
I listened to Hatfield and the North at Rainbow. They were very wonderful and they made my heart a prisoner.

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Re: Behringer's clone army

Post by clubbedtodeath » Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:53 pm

The B*hringer mixer I had 15 years ago was c**p (YMMV). The Model D they produced recently is not - I own one. It's impressive, considering what Moog were charging for reissues but a few years before.

I do have problems with their behaviour towards those who criticise them or their products. Lawsuits for expressing opinions? Targetting individuals with advertising campaigns? And let's not forget their long history in guitar pedals.

Not everyone agrees with this perspective. But some background research beforehand is important, whatever conclusion one arrives at.

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