anything battery-powered

Discussions about anything analog, digital, MIDI, synth technology, techniques, theories and more.
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PitchBender
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Post by PitchBender » Tue Mar 20, 2007 4:19 pm

JSRockit wrote:
hageir wrote:
KLAXON wrote:

Yeah, more importantly, why would you want to do that. support your local shop, they die off so easily these days.

JUGEL
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Post by JUGEL » Tue Mar 20, 2007 5:11 pm

The CS01 is the best/most practical choice. but my fav is still the Korg PSS-50.. just wish it had MIDI .. could anyone do that here??

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KLAXON
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Post by KLAXON » Tue Mar 20, 2007 7:15 pm

JSRockit wrote:No store worth a damn will let you do this...
If you are talking about Moobys question of sampling the records in the store I would agree. (I was simply saying that it was possible) If you are talking about taking a handytrax into a store to preview records, like I said I do, no record store that I have ever been to has had a problem with me bringing in a handytrax to listen to records. In fact, every now and then there is even other people in the store with portable turntables doing the same thing. It is actually quite common practice to bring a portable turn into a record shop with you.

(PS, pitch bender, I don't mean to sound like a grumpy old fart, but please watch your quotes and make sure that the proper person is being quoted. its just a pet peave of mine :) )
.....i have some things that create and sculpt sound.

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PitchBender
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Post by PitchBender » Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:28 pm

KLAXON wrote:(PS, pitch bender, I am a grumpy old fart)

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Zonkout
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Post by Zonkout » Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:38 pm

Paia OZ (Great for picnics--it even sounds like a picnic.)
Synare 3 (I'd love to see someone walking down the street with headphones plugged into one of these UFOs, whacking away at it!)
________________________________________
I own some key boards and rhythmic boxes.

KLAXON
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Post by KLAXON » Tue Mar 20, 2007 9:08 pm

PitchBender wrote:
KLAXON wrote:(PS, pitch bender, I am a grumpy old fart)
I guess I walked right into that one. :lol:
.....i have some things that create and sculpt sound.

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Tyler2000
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Post by Tyler2000 » Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:01 pm

I can't really be bothered to read the rest of the replies, but I can contribute these iff they haven't been done yet:
Roland TR-626
Siel MDP-40
Casio CZ-101
" VL-1
" SK-series
All casios
all portasounds
blaioneianef
so what do I put down here now?

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Post by Angstwulf » Tue Mar 20, 2007 11:24 pm

JSRockit wrote:
Angstwulf wrote: M Audio Oxygen8
Oh man, let's not start listing battery powered controllers that don't make noise.
Uh, it could be used as a percussion instrument. Wouldn't even need the batteries.

And as a fellow SP404 afficiando you could possibly appreciate my loading a bunch of synthy / paddy / screechy noises on the SP404 and using the Oxygen8 to trigger weirdo chords.

Normally hiding in a closet during road trips to the in-laws.

Laters,
Tommy

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Post by Garth A7 » Wed Mar 21, 2007 3:14 am

As someone already said the Poly-800 is, but I don't recall if the JX-8P is. When I get back to Chicago to pick-it-up and verify whether or not it takes batteries. At 61 keys it's kinda hard to strap-on and walk around with like the 800 w/49.
Have, but not with me:
Roland JX-8P Synthesizer
Korg Poly-800 Synthesizer and
Roland SVC-350 Vocoder
What synthesizer and/or vocoder will be next?!!

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JSRockit
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Post by JSRockit » Wed Mar 21, 2007 1:41 pm

KLAXON wrote:
JSRockit wrote:No store worth a damn will let you do this...
If you are talking about Moobys question of sampling the records in the store I would agree. (I was simply saying that it was possible) If you are talking about taking a handytrax into a store to preview records, like I said I do, no record store that I have ever been to has had a problem with me bringing in a handytrax to listen to records. In fact, every now and then there is even other people in the store with portable turntables doing the same thing. It is actually quite common practice to bring a portable turn into a record shop with you.
)
Yeah, I meant sampling. For lack of a better genre that suits me...I'm a hip-hop head...so I am aware of people "digging" with PT01s, Handytrax, Old school Columbias, and even Fisher Prices. I own a Black Handytrax myself...but I just listen to 7"-es on my couch.
Korg Volcas / 6 x TE POs / MicroBrute / EH Space Drum & Crash Pad

MitchK1989
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Post by MitchK1989 » Wed Mar 21, 2007 10:15 pm

translucencecs wrote:
When I make up my own battery packs, I only do it for the gear that runs off of external mains adaptors, like the 1st and 2nd gen Electribes, the MC-303, etc. I'm considering making one up for the MS-2000R and Yamaha RX5, but I'm not sure why I'd need it, nowadays - the way I work is kinda different to back when I was messing with grooveboxes...
Ok... How could I do that?

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JSRockit
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Post by JSRockit » Thu Mar 22, 2007 12:59 am

Angstwulf wrote:
Uh, it could be used as a percussion instrument. Wouldn't even need the batteries.
Yeah, but so can my skull...
Korg Volcas / 6 x TE POs / MicroBrute / EH Space Drum & Crash Pad

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gmeredith
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Post by gmeredith » Thu Mar 22, 2007 1:19 am

Pitchbender wrote:
Speaking of inverters. Is there anyway to lug around a car battery and use it to run gear? is it possible? realistic?
Yes:


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Cheers, Graham

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translucencecs
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Post by translucencecs » Thu Mar 22, 2007 2:41 am

MitchK1989 wrote:
translucencecs wrote:
When I make up my own battery packs, I only do it for the gear that runs off of external mains adaptors, like the 1st and 2nd gen Electribes, the MC-303, etc. I'm considering making one up for the MS-2000R and Yamaha RX5, but I'm not sure why I'd need it, nowadays - the way I work is kinda different to back when I was messing with grooveboxes...
Ok... How could I do that?
Well, there's some math involved, and I'm assuming a rudimentary understanding of batteries and electronics, but here goes...

1. Find the power requirements of the equipment involved. It MUST run on an external, DC, power supply. Ideally, the voltage requirements need to be a multiple of 1.5V (3, 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, 10.5, 12, etc...). Most applicable modules I've encountered run on 9V or 12V. The current requirements vary wildly, but are often around the 500-700mA range. The manufacturer will generally supply information about voltage, polarity and either current or power draw - for example, the Korg ER-1 Mk II runs on 9V, 5.5W power, which can be calculated in terms of current by a straight division - 5.5W / 9V = 0.611111A = 611.111mA. You'll usually find this information either on the module itself somewhere, or in the specs in the manual.

2. Calculate what combination of 1.5V cells or 9V batteries will deliver a single "voltage unit" for the module - the ER-1 could be supplied by 6x 1.5V cells (in series) or 1x 9V battery as a single "unit".

3. Find out what one of these cells or batteries can supply in terms of total current x time in mAh - you may well have to check online, probably on the manufacturer's website. As an example, A single Duracell 9V alkaline battery will deliver a total 580mAh. Most 9V batteries are around the 300mAh mark.

4. To give the absolute theoretical maximum time one "unit" of batteries could run your module for, divide the mAh rating by the module's current draw in mA. For a Duracell powering an ER-1 Mk II, the calculation is as follows: 580mAh / 611.111mA = 0.949h = 56.94 minutes.

5. Divide this in half. This is just a wild, generalised rule of thumb, but the output of regular batteries slopes off as they run down. To safely guarantee that it can deliver what you want, be conservative. So for your Duracell alkaline, call it roughly 30 minutes.

6. This means that if you want to run the ER-1 for 2 hours, you'll need 4 Duracell 9V batteries.

5. Buy appropriate battery holders or snaps for the quantity you require. If you're using the above example, you'll want 4x 9V battery snaps. If you were to do this with AAs, you'll need a multiple of 6x or (3x 2x!) series battery holders. (The mAh of AAs is generally higher than for 9V batteries, because they're bigger, so I'm not gonna do the permutations and combinations here - all I'll say is that you want holders for 1x6, 2x6, 3x6 or Xx6 batteries in this case!).

6. In the current example, connect your snaps in parallel - i.e. negative-negative and positive-positive. You'll also need some 2-core wire that can handle the current you're running. Speaker wire can usually manage these low currents. Try to avoid anything heavy-gauge like mains wire, purely for the sake of convenience and ease of use!

7. Buy yourself an appropriate plug for the power connector on your hardware, or salvage one from an unused PSU, by cutting it off with a good length of trailing wire to connect it up. Connect up your plug to your wire to your battery holders such that the polarity matches between what it says on the module and the batteries - i.e. trace a path back from positive to positive and negative to negative. Insulate all joins with tape or heatshrink.

8. Attach batteries to the holders, mount them all in a nice box for convenience, and plug it into the back of your module.

9. Switch on and watch in horror as your batteries run out in two hours flat.

10. All the above are rough guidelines. Do this at your own peril and I accept no responsibility or liability if you screw anything up. This will ONLY work on equipment that takes polarised DC to power it, unless you're very lucky! Then again, it's worked for me for years, so have fun with it - hope you can (mostly) understand it all - it ain't that difficult, when you get your head around it! :)

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JSRockit
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Post by JSRockit » Thu Mar 22, 2007 1:35 pm

Tyler2000 wrote:I can't really be bothered to read the rest of the replies, but I can contribute these iff they haven't been done yet:
Roland TR-626
Siel MDP-40
Casio CZ-101
" VL-1
" SK-series
All casios
all portasounds
blaioneianef
If you can't be bothered to read, don't post... :evil: However, you did post one or two that wasn't metioned, so we'll let it slide... :lol:
Korg Volcas / 6 x TE POs / MicroBrute / EH Space Drum & Crash Pad

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