Jupiter-6 Restoration Project Log

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Bross
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Post by Bross » Mon May 28, 2007 4:21 am

VCOs are CEM3340
The service manual is available at http://dl.analoghell.com/

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Post by thisispainful » Mon May 28, 2007 4:36 am

cant wait to see it when its done.
my jp6 has been great and hasnt let me down yet. i got mine from a roland rep who had owned it since new.
he sold it so he could buy his jv something or another.
i have thought about having the thing chromed and the control panel etched with the lettering and having some coloured leds put in as well.
i decided to leave it stock for now however at some point i may customise this synth. i agree the knobs and sliders arent the best looking or feeling on this synth.

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Post by StepLogik » Mon May 28, 2007 12:54 pm

Bross wrote:VCOs are CEM3340
The service manual is available at http://dl.analoghell.com/
Thanks! I've not had any luck finding the service manual until now.

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Post by Blue Monster 65 » Mon May 28, 2007 1:35 pm

Good deal! Thanks, Bross - that's one less thing that I'll have to do tomorrow. The shop's been around since the late '70's, so there are boxes of s**t to dig through - ugh!

SL, what exactly led to the condition of your JP6? Did you buy it like that? Was it left somewhere? What's the story behind it?

You may want to get yourself set up with Mauser (http://www.mouser.com/index.cfm?handler=home - these guys are omnipotent!) and Digikey (http://www.digikey.com/) - This kind of project becomes a habit! I haven't used Analog Devices (http://www.analog.com/en/), but I've heard good things about them. Antique Electronic Supply (http://tubesandmore.com/) is also good for all kinds of esoteric stuff like knobs, etc. I deal with their wholesale side, but their prices either way are pretty good.

Can't help with the graphics, as we don't repair that sort of thing, but it sounds like Custom Synth is the way to go.

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Post by StepLogik » Mon May 28, 2007 2:33 pm

I'm not sure how the JP-6 got the way it did. The guy I bought it from had a giant pile of synths and he seemed to know what he was talking about. It looks like this JP-6 had a drink spilled into it which caused the rusting. There was also an enormous amount of dirt and debris, which makes me wonder if it was not stored in a garage or something. When I bought it, the only functional defect was the busted balance knob which I believe occurred during shipment from the seller (he claimed it was fine when he shipped it but there is no way to know and filing a claim with FedEx or UPS is a pointless endeavor).

So far this has been an interesting project. I really wish I was skilled at soldering small components. I installed car audio and security for years so I'm quite good at soldering wires and terminals with a high-wattage gun, but I'm really nervous about the small-scale stuff. I suppose I could "practice" and get enough to replace components myself but I'd really just rather have a pro do it and know its going to be done correctly!

If this project turns out well, I can already sense that I'm going to want to try another one. I've got a Juno-60 that needs some work (also couldn't sell it either) so it might be next. If I take on the Juno-60 project, it will be a much more radical mod - I will do a whole new front panel with completely different controls, layout, and graphics. I will also install the Kenton MIDI kit and probably build a new chassis for it so that its shaped more like a polymoog. We'll see..

... off to the drugstore to get some dye and alcohol to clean the key contacts.

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Post by Blue Monster 65 » Mon May 28, 2007 3:56 pm

Good deal - you've got the bug, so you're stuck now. Hahahahahahahaha!

DO NOT USE A GUN ON THOSE ELECTRONICS!!! Get yourself a good iron, so you can be not only careful, but hit the right spot, OK? You need suggestions, PM me and we'll talk. I like Weller units the best, but others like others, sooo ...

I kind of figured this one had been left in a garage after a gig. All the c**p that gets into 'em usually comes from sitting semi-outside. Believe me, I've had a couple come in that you would not have believed: mud dauber nests inside a DX7, dead coachroaches pouring out of an Ensoniq with a couple of monster spiders living on them. Just really fun stuff like that! :lol: And the client always says, "I don't know how that got like that!"

A Polymoog-looking Juno 60, eh? There's a market for those, I'm sure! And I would definitely like to at least see one ... heh heh heh ...

Keep us posted.

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Post by StepLogik » Mon May 28, 2007 5:12 pm

Blue Monster 65 wrote: A Polymoog-looking Juno 60, eh? There's a market for those, I'm sure! And I would definitely like to at least see one ... heh heh heh ...
:) It would probably be more of an academic exercise than anything. If I did the Juno-60 project, I would scrap the front panel controls, the main CPU, patch memory, etc and write my own firmware (I have a little bit of experience in this area) to control the synth and manage patch storage as well as my own midi implementation. It would be an interesting and educational project and would result in a vastly improved synth. Whether I do it or not depends on how difficult it will be to reverse-engineer the guts. If I can figure out (or find) the protocol between the main CPU and module board (its an 8-bit data bus) then I think it would be a somewhat straightforward project.

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Post by Automatic Gainsay » Mon May 28, 2007 5:30 pm

Very interesting thread, StepLogik!
Good luck in your endeavour!
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Post by Blue Monster 65 » Mon May 28, 2007 6:02 pm

Got me there - I don't write code. I'll leave that up to you guys. I did have a hand in creating a midi interface at one point in time (from scratch). What a pain in the a*s. It was for a CR-8000. Now you can much more easily get them from Analog Solutions and the like. I'd recommend that instead of ours - OUCH! It works great, but I will never - I say again - NEVER - go through that horror if I don't have to. Ugh!

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Post by custom synth » Tue May 29, 2007 12:05 am

hi
let me know what graphice you want , mmmmm ( white would be good with walnut end panel additions )
jeff : )
www.CustomSynth.co.uk
p.s. dont forget to include the rail below the keys

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Post by StepLogik » Tue May 29, 2007 12:20 am

custom synth wrote:hi
let me know what graphice you want , mmmmm ( white would be good with walnut end panel additions )
jeff : )
www.CustomSynth.co.uk
p.s. dont forget to include the rail below the keys
Just sent you an email. The rail below the keys will be included. It was rusted out really bad, but I took a wire brush to it and got some of it off. You might find it will need further sanding.

I will be shipping the panels to you tomorrow!

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Post by StepLogik » Tue May 29, 2007 1:14 pm

Blue Monster 65 wrote:Got me there - I don't write code. I'll leave that up to you guys. I did have a hand in creating a midi interface at one point in time (from scratch). What a pain in the a*s. It was for a CR-8000. Now you can much more easily get them from Analog Solutions and the like. I'd recommend that instead of ours - OUCH! It works great, but I will never - I say again - NEVER - go through that horror if I don't have to. Ugh!

Woof! - Scott
My career has been spent writing code so I'm not as averse to it as many people. However, I mostly program in high level languages like C# and C++. Writing low-level firmware code is very tedious and time-consuming. Supposedly there are tools and simulators for computers that allow you to completely develop and debug your firmware in a virtual environment before physically working with the hardware. I've done plenty of MIDI programming in various high-level programming languages but I would imagine that parsing a MIDI stream using registers and assembly language, etc is pure h**l!

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Post by StepLogik » Wed May 30, 2007 1:43 am

I finally was able to remove the pitch bender lever/pot from the bender panel by liberal use of acetone and a razor. I also removed the power switch from main panel which proved to be more difficult than I expected.

With everything removed from the panels, I was able to ship them off today to Custom Synth!! Woohoo! I can't wait to see what they look like when they come back.

Shipping them to the UK cost a fortune. I had planned on shipping them USPS but the thought of no insurance or tracking just didn't sit right so I took them to UPS. I paid dearly but I suppose there is a slightly better chance they might actually make it to Jeff.

Getting closer!

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Post by Blue Monster 65 » Wed May 30, 2007 3:35 am

Glad to hear you got them apart and off on their way. I'd say it's definitely worth the peace of mind to have both insurance and tracking numbers!

Writing code, eh? I had a couple of classes in college wherein we had to do just that. What a pain! Mind you, this was back before PC's were called PC's - Hahahahahahahahahaha! Just never did much with that sort of thing, but I know plenty of people who do. They're into nanotech ... I'm into tubes ... :)

What sorts of parts are you needing?

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Post by sandwich » Wed May 30, 2007 9:39 am

StepLogik wrote:I'm not sure how the JP-6 got the way it did. The guy I bought it from had a giant pile of synths and he seemed to know what he was talking about. It looks like this JP-6 had a drink spilled into it which caused the rusting. There was also an enormous amount of dirt and debris, which makes me wonder if it was not stored in a garage or something. When I bought it, the only functional defect was the busted balance knob which I believe occurred during shipment from the seller (he claimed it was fine when he shipped it but there is no way to know and filing a claim with FedEx or UPS is a pointless endeavor).

So far this has been an interesting project. I really wish I was skilled at soldering small components. I installed car audio and security for years so I'm quite good at soldering wires and terminals with a high-wattage gun, but I'm really nervous about the small-scale stuff. I suppose I could "practice" and get enough to replace components myself but I'd really just rather have a pro do it and know its going to be done correctly!

If this project turns out well, I can already sense that I'm going to want to try another one. I've got a Juno-60 that needs some work (also couldn't sell it either) so it might be next. If I take on the Juno-60 project, it will be a much more radical mod - I will do a whole new front panel with completely different controls, layout, and graphics. I will also install the Kenton MIDI kit and probably build a new chassis for it so that its shaped more like a polymoog. We'll see..

... off to the drugstore to get some dye and alcohol to clean the key contacts.
Hi StepLogik,

I just restored my Juno 6. I didn't modify the casing though, I just wanted to get it sounding good again. It had become very noisy and there was also a very high pitched hum, even with the chorus unit off. I cleaned out all the pots and sliders and it did the trick. The noise and hum completely disappeared. It sounds great now! Then I installed the Kenton midi kit. It's given my Juno a new lease of life :D

I've just finished doing my Moog Prodigy. That was in an even worse state, it wasn't even making a sound! I went a bit further on that and re-wired everything. I replaced anything that was replaceable, even the audio output jack and power switch. Thankfully it works great now :D Now I'm just the restoring the wooden casing and bringing the wood back to it's natural beauty.

After that, I've got a Pro One and a Roland SH-09 that need the same treatment. I really enjoy doing this and it's turned into quite a hobby but I can't wait until they are all done and I can make some music with them again!

:wink:

Regards.

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