alesis ion

Discussions about anything analog, digital, MIDI, synth technology, techniques, theories and more.
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Box
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Post by Box » Mon Jul 23, 2007 1:33 pm

I myself bought an Alesis Ion about a month ago and have been extremely pleased with it. The Ion is more for emulating analog sounds, not acoustic or real instruments. I'm sure if you wanted to fry your brain in attempts of emulating acoustic instruments on the Ion I'm sure it can be done, but that's why the make romplers...Triton, Fantom, Motif, Fusion etc... Plus the customer support from Alesis is great. Sent them an e-mail and they answered within 24 hours, closer to 12. And if you ever happen to need replacement parts the prices are quite reasonable. But the Ion doesn't have a sequencer, has an arpeggiator though. Can be split/layerd four ways. And the sounds you can get are unbelievable for the price. As far as Micron or Ion...I had a chance to play with a Micron for a few minutes and what I got out of it was an Ion smushed up into a smaller compartment with less memory, less sounds, and much harder to edit sounds. But the Ion is a great synth and would suggest it to anyone.

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Try a Fusion

Post by kogmachine » Mon Jul 23, 2007 5:29 pm

The Ion has no sequencer, a non-programmable arpeggiator, and does not accurately or easily emulate acoustic sounds. It lacks delay and reverb effects. I use delay and reverb pedals with mine and that works well for me. I have found it easy to make some sweet sounding patches with my limited programming knowledge. If I had to do it over again, I'd still buy an Ion. I own the microkorg as well and liked that it had a programmable arp, but I don't use it much anymore. The Ion just sounds better and has 4 timbres so it's easy to make a rhythmic beat. It really could use greater polyphony, but if you like the micron but hate it's lack of control surface the Ion's the way to go. If you want acoustic sounds go for a QS6.2 or better yet a Fusion. Fusion does it all FM, VA, Sampling, Physical Modeling. It's the best workstation on the market now for it's price. Much, MUCH cheaper than an Oasys or NeKo, and half the price of the Triton, Motif or Fantom X. The 61 key Fusion goes for about $800 ($1000 w/ M1 mkII monitors) at NovaMusik.com or $1000 at Sweetwater.com w/ fully upgraded RAM and a huge soundset. Now that I think about it, I'd probably have gotten the Fusion instead but it wasn't on the market when I got my Ion.
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Post by goober » Sat Jul 28, 2007 3:23 am

I just got the micron, the ion was out of my budget. This being my first synth I was hoping it would be a great introduction to understanding the concepts of synthesizers. Originally I wanted a vintage synth. The sound editing is very tedious, and sometimes seems very subtle. I'll just have to be patient since I've only had it for a few days. I underestimated the complexity of synthesizing.

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Post by kogmachine » Sat Jul 28, 2007 6:34 am

goober wrote:I just got the micron, the ion was out of my budget. This being my first synth I was hoping it would be a great introduction to understanding the concepts of synthesizers. Originally I wanted a vintage synth. The sound editing is very tedious, and sometimes seems very subtle. I'll just have to be patient since I've only had it for a few days. I underestimated the complexity of synthesizing.
I believe somebody coded an editor for the Micron called Micronizer. You can get it at the Alesis Ion/Micron group at yahoo.com. It'll probably make the editing alot less tedious, but I wouldn't know I don't have a Micron. The Micron is definitely not a good example of an analog synth, with it's lack of controls and menu page hopping. Try out that Micronizer program and you'll probably like designing sounds alot more. Here's where it is but you'll have to join before you can download.

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/ales ... icronizer/
Don't be afraid, ever... cause this is just a ride.

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