total noob

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omoanya
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total noob

Post by omoanya » Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:26 pm

Hello Synthmasters,

I am completely new to synthesis and an oldschool need-to-learn from the ground-up kind of guy. I am looking to buy some sort of system with the absolute minimum basics - i just want to learn what a filter does how a LFO works etc. i was hoping to have patch cables or someway to visually understand the signal path and a keyboard plus an input for an instrument. Can anyone recommend something vintage that me an my young son could purchase to experience the discovery of synthesis as if it were the 60-70's?


thank you for your kind help,

Omo

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JSRockit
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Post by JSRockit » Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:30 pm

The only vintage synth that comes to mind is the Korg MS10 and MS20 since it has a built in keyboard and patching...while still being relatively basic.

http://www.vintagesynth.com/korg/ms10.shtml

http://www.vintagesynth.com/korg/ms20.shtml
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Post by nabla » Thu Aug 02, 2007 3:53 pm

Analogue Solutions Red Square
http://www.analoguesolutions.com/

or any modular system
http://www.synthesizers.com/ ($120 a month for 12 months gets you a working system with room to expand. -- http://www.synthesizers.com/system-entry1.html)
http://www.cyndustries.com/
http://www.modcan.com/
http://www.synthtech.com/
doepfer, analogue systems, cwejmann, plan b, blacet etc.

if you are open to a computer interface:
nord modular
arturia moog modular

have fun :!:

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Post by omoanya » Thu Aug 02, 2007 4:03 pm

thanks guys ... those look great - what do you think about the concertmate realistic by moog - ? I guess i dont have to have a a patch cable - i just thought it would really help me to understand where the signal is going ...
-omo

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Post by hearttimes » Thu Aug 02, 2007 4:03 pm

i would also think it would be cool if my father and i built-up one of those synthesizer by the month projects. although i would consider buying a few moths worth in advance, because with the current plan i don't think any sound comes out for three months. that's too long to wait.

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Post by micahjonhughes » Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:07 pm

If you're looking for something patchable, you're really jumping to the big boy toys. That's a big step for someone who is completely new to synthesis.

Admittedly any matrix mod synth with menu driven programming makes it difficult to comprehend exactly how the sound is being formed. That is why a lot of people suggest a synth with sliders so that all of the parameters are there to see. Makes it a bit easier to understand. The Roland layout on like the Juno 6, 60 and 106 is also really good for learning as the parameters are more or less laid out in the same order as the signal path.

The MG-1 is overpriced and the layout of the controls not particularly conducive to following the signal path.

Unless you're just looking to spend a lot of cash, get something pretty basic and experiment to learn how the sound was made.

If you really want to learn how most musicians learned in the early 70s, I guess you should get a Minimoog. It is not patchable.

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JSRockit
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Post by JSRockit » Thu Aug 02, 2007 6:05 pm

omoanya wrote:thanks guys ... those look great - what do you think about the concertmate realistic by moog - ? I guess i dont have to have a a patch cable - i just thought it would really help me to understand where the signal is going ...
-omo
The Realistic Moog has weird descriptions for all the parameters... so I'd suggest going for a different Moog. Moog's are great for learning on since the signal flow makes sense... also, something like the Roland SH-101 is nice too for learning. Have you thought of the Moog Little Phatty?
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Post by OriginalJambo » Thu Aug 02, 2007 7:52 pm

Some good suggestions?

Roland Juno series, KORG PolySix, Alesis Ion are pretty good for cutting your teeth. Many synths from Roland SH series would be good too.

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Post by PHC » Thu Aug 02, 2007 8:42 pm

I would recommend downloading some softsynths first so you can get a hang of the basics and see what you really like and if you need patch cables and stuff. I know that turning real knobs is more fun and surely makes you learn faster, but with softsynths you don't risk throwing money at something that you won't like or will be to limiting when you have learned the basics. Softsynths also enable you to see how a patch constructed which is not possible on many synths (at least not in an easy way)

I would recommend Arturia Minimoog V, a demo can be downloaded from their website (use google). If you are going to learn synths you have to know how a minimoog looks like/works and it is as basic as it gets in terms of the signal path, but gies you a lot to tweak and lot's of sounds are to be programmed with it.

I wouldn't recommend Modular V from Arturia though as it may appear to complex for a begginner.

If you want something with patch cords, you should check out a demo of Nord Modular G2 from Clavia (www.clavia.com). It is complex, but you can add simple elements and connect them together with virtual cables and see what happens.

Also you should get a book or something (on the other hand the web is full of resources). Welsh Synthesizer Cookbook is nice (and you get a free softsynth and a patchbook to program some sounds on it) - look for it on ebay.

As for a hardware synth, once you have learned the basics and what kind of interface/functions you like and read this forum for a while you can make an better decision and spend your money wisely.

Welcome to the World of Synths. Don't let GAS get you! ;-)

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Post by ReaPeR » Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:17 pm

why not starting learning modular synthesis with Karma Fx Synth? It's modular, has a great UI, it's free and it sound really good!

then, when you'll be more expert, you can jump to a more expensive instrument

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Post by JSRockit » Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:31 pm

Soft synths are just not as fun as hardware...I say stick with hardware first. Learning on a softsynth by turning knobs with a mouse sucked. I think the thread starter has the right idea. Also, there is nothing 60's or 70's ish about soft synths. :lol:
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Post by JUGEL » Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:49 pm

A Vermona Perfourmer with a 4-channel MIDI/CV converter hooked up to any sequencer would be a h**l of a lot of fun. The simpleness of mono .. but X4.

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Post by megawatt » Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:01 pm

Perhaps starting out with something like a Roland SH 201 would be helpful as the front panel clearly lays out the signal flow. It's not overly complex and would be a good starter synth.

http://www.roland.com/products/en/SH-201/index.html
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Post by JUGEL » Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:16 pm

I personally would avoid anything that even has a "mode" button.. just not a good way to "learn" anything.

I had to learn things like LFO on a MC-303.. I don't wish that upon anyone.

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Post by JSRockit » Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:21 pm

JUGEL wrote:A Vermona Perfourmer with a 4-channel MIDI/CV converter hooked up to any sequencer would be a h**l of a lot of fun. The simpleness of mono .. but X4.
Hooked up to an MFB Step 64...that could be nice.
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