Mono/Poly vs. Polysix

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OriginalJambo
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Post by OriginalJambo » Tue Sep 04, 2007 2:07 am

whiteyhouston wrote:that's kooky talk!
Nah, listen to the above example for some more mellowness. :)
the pads we got were so full and creamy that the p6 always seemed distorted in (mental) comparison...
I dunno - the PolySix is plenty that in my opinion.It's awesome for strings thanks to that ensemble effect.

Maybe something was up with your PolySix? Or maybe it's all subjective and another one man's warm is a Juno whilst another's is something else. ;)

Don't get me wrong though - the Juno has a lovely sound but the PolySix just does it for me for some reason.

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Post by Micke » Tue Sep 04, 2007 4:08 pm

Automatic Gainsay wrote:
The Polymoog came close to the best of both worlds by almost making a VCA and VCF per note... but something I can't remember about the architecture resulted in it not quite succeeding at that.
The Polymoog does have a VCA and VCF per note but only in its "preset" or "direct" modes. If I recall correctly you can edit the envelope settings in preset mode and still retain correct articulation though.
Anyways, one of the reasons the PM didn't quite succeed was that it offered just two programmable filters: a fixed filter bank (resonator) and a single VCF.

Sound On Sound describes its shortcomings better than me:
"But the VCF proved to be the Polymoog's Achilles heel. The instrument was fully polyphonic in its Preset and Direct modes. But if you attempted to programme your own patches, the single programmable filter meant that the synth couldn't shape the frequency characteristics of any new notes if previous notes were still depressed. As a result, the Polymoog often sounded more like enhanced string ensembles such as the Korg PE1000 and ARP Omni than like later generations of polysynths."


Some string synths had a VCA per note, but all of the notes were still put through a single filter (if they had a filter at all).
Some examples of such stringers are the Logan string melody I & II, Roland RS-101 & 202, Yamaha SS-30, Godwin string concert, Korg PE-2000 & Lambda etc.
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Post by whiteyhouston » Tue Sep 04, 2007 7:03 pm

OriginalJambo wrote:
I dunno - the PolySix is plenty that in my opinion.It's awesome for strings thanks to that ensemble effect.

Maybe something was up with your PolySix? Or maybe it's all subjective and another one man's warm is a Juno whilst another's is something else. ;)

Don't get me wrong though - the Juno has a lovely sound but the PolySix just does it for me for some reason.
ah man, I'm not knocking the poly6.. I love that synth. it's currently my synth du jour since I only recently got it back from the shop...

I'm probably comparing apples to chocolate cake here... the stuff we did on the juno that I'm remembering was most likely not clean.. can't quite remember but there was probably an outboard chorus / verb / delay on it that bolstered my opinion of it...

but, I'm with you, the P6 totally does it for me too

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Post by whiteyhouston » Tue Sep 04, 2007 7:58 pm

sweet samples too!
makes me want to go home and do the messaround

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Post by MrFrodo » Tue Sep 04, 2007 10:43 pm

The Mono/Poly was adequately named. If it were meant to function more as a polysynth, the abbreviations would be reversed: Poly/Mono.

The PolySix is very different from the Mono/Poly, but you also can't deny that one (kind of) came from the other.
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Post by OriginalJambo » Thu Sep 06, 2007 12:24 am

whiteyhouston wrote:sweet samples too!
makes me want to go home and do the messaround
Cheers man - glad you liked. The Juno can do warm pads too IMO, just a different kind of warm. ;)

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Post by sizzlemeister » Thu Sep 06, 2007 2:08 am

Yeah, nice sounds BTW OJ. I especially liked that bell sound. Isn't it neat how the P6 can get sounds like that with such a limited architecture? I think what is really special about this synth is that while it does have its limits, it has such a unique sound. The only other instrument that has this sound is the Trident, but then that is missing the effects of the P6 (of course, the P6 is missing the Trident's awesome flanger). It has oodles more character than a Juno.

Here's something I did that is all P6 excepting the drums:

http://www.soundclick.com/util/getplaye ... 13486&q=hi

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Post by spookyman » Fri Sep 07, 2007 2:04 pm

@sizzlemeister

Great Bass Sound at the end of the track !

Not bad for such a "cheap" synth...I'm loving my P6 too :wink:

Limited, but sometimes it helps to be creative. And the SSM sound is special, not better than the Juno Sound, simply different. Perhaps more organic, 70's sounding. Juno is more 80's oriented.

I never compared the Polysix to the MonoPoly :oops:
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Post by Synthaholic » Fri Sep 07, 2007 2:22 pm

Great track Sizzlemeister! Makes me want to get another P6. ;) It's got lovely filters, and a distinct sound. Plus it's such an easy synth to tweak with all the knobs. About the only thing it's really missing is portamento. I see you made good use of the filters' self oscillation when you crank the resonance in your track. It's great for percussion or sound effects.

I've never played with a Mono/Poly either, but years ago I stumbled on a Juno 6 at the local store and of course I had to check it out, but ended up passing on it since it sounded like my P6.

I have a Halloween tape I made 10 years ago that featured ghosts, cat meows and a helicopter I did on my P6. I'll have to pull some MP3s and post them up sometime.
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Post by spookyman » Fri Sep 07, 2007 2:38 pm

Synthaholic wrote: About the only thing it's really missing is portamento.
Oh yes...but this same function is missing on the Juno 6 and 60 too. AFAIK, the 106 has portamento. But this is really something that i'm missing on the P6.
And sometimes, i would like a stereo output...But it's easy to make it stereo with a good analog FX pedal. It adds sometimes more features and make it sounding very wide.
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