Why are synths more popular in N. Europe/Amer than S. ?

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micahjonhughes
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Post by micahjonhughes » Sun Sep 02, 2007 10:01 pm

JSRockit wrote: ...the MC is the main attraction.
Of course. What I should have said is that after the MC the DJ out ranks the producer in terms of visibility.

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Post by sineSurfer » Sun Sep 02, 2007 11:29 pm

Add to the mix the culture (or the lack of) embedded from generation to generation. People need some education to understand new or different things but most of the time it goes like, "why change or do any effort if I'm fine like this?" main reason for this is the schools don't teach people to learn and explore, just make them memorize stuff... good for the system, bad for the individue.

This way, we have endless repetitions of the same old formulas(name any number of commercial pop/rock/folk, etc. songs here), people keeps consuming that again and again in a meaningless way of living and nothing changes.

But hey, that's the way it is, why try to change it? :P

Nah, just kiding, the truth is we need the variety(bad, regular, good, exelent or whatever kinds of music and generes)to enjoy more what we like, imagine a world where everybody likes, listen and create only(pick the genere)music, thatwolud become a very boring world pretty soon.

The solution?, take your music to places where it is apreciated and be happy. :D
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Post by Paolo Di Nicolantonio » Mon Sep 03, 2007 1:05 am

micahjonhughes wrote:I'll agree with my fellow N. American, electronic music is not very popular and never really has been here.

The weird thing is that electronics are all over our pop music. What would rap, R&B, or Brittany be without synths and samplers?

The issue in the U.S. is that synths are just not cool. The image of the guitar playing musician is so strong that few teens want to get a synth when they can get a guitar. We have Guitar Centers everywhere but no Keyboard Center or anything close. In the past few years with the revitalization of synth pop, you do see a few more kids taking some interest in playing keyboard but not many.
I agree with micahjonhughes - in the US playing synths is just "not cool". Guitar was, is, and always will be king in the USA.

What's interesting is that the very idea of SYNTH POP is much different from Europe to the USA. When I think of Synth Pop, I think of bands like Bronski Beat, Pet Shop Boys, Dead Or Alive, Depeche Mode, Human League, Yazoo, Duran Duran, Howard Jones, Nick Kershaw, New Order etc. etc. etc. etc.,

when I talk to an average Joe American, for Synth Pop they come up with "And I ran" by A Flock Of Seagulls (Whisky Tango Foxtrot?), "Whip It" by Devo (Whisky Tango Foxtrot??), and even Rush's "Tom Sawyer" (Whisky Tango Foxtrot to the nth power). All these tracks for me have nothing to do with synth pop, but more with classic, guitar-based rock.

ON the other hand, House, Techno, Jazz, Lounge music and a LOT of other great stuff comes from America :-)
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Post by t3hsd » Mon Sep 03, 2007 5:50 am

you know what's really interesting?
There are so many series of Soviet Synthesizers but I don't know any famous Russian electronic acts
just pretend for all intensive purposes that im completely retarded

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Post by cartesia » Mon Sep 03, 2007 5:56 am

t3hsd wrote:you know what's really interesting?
There are so many series of Soviet Synthesizers but I don't know any famous Russian electronic acts
Is 'Vlad' Russian? :lol:

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Post by Psy_Free » Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:27 am

There are so many series of Soviet Synthesizers but I don't know any famous Russian electronic acts
How about :

Artemy Artemiev
Mikhail Chekalin
Sergai Samoliv
Igor Wakhevitch
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Post by differentbydesign » Mon Sep 03, 2007 3:44 pm

Funny but before joining this forum I was under the impression North America was an electronic music wasteland!

I think the perception is cultural by that I mean I bet a Polish person could name Russian artists and a Mexican might be a fan of a composer from Argentina just because of cultural connections therefore it stands to reason that most people from 1 place are mostly exposed to artists from similar cultural places. Add to that Socio Economic factors like more wealth in the north and I think you have got an answer to the original question.

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Post by micahjonhughes » Mon Sep 03, 2007 5:09 pm

differentbydesign wrote:Funny but before joining this forum I was under the impression North America was an electronic music wasteland!
I'm not sure how you got the idea of a wasteland. The US had so many major synth manufactures; Moog, Buchla, Sequential, E-mu, and Ensoniq; that there must have been considerable domestic demand for synths.

There has been and is electronic music here. From the past evidence can be seen in Detroit techno and house music. It is just that electronic music in any form has never caught popular interest. For example the techno/house crazy of the late 80s and early 90s never made the transition from underground phenomena to popular culture here in the US.

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Post by MarkM » Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:17 pm

I don't know about the rest of the world, but in the USA piano isn't taught much to the general public. In schools the emphasis is on band instruments and percussion. In addition it is difficult to march with a piano. I doubt much school music is orchestrated/arranged for multiple keyboards. A decent guitar is cheaper than a decent acoustic piano and takes up much less room. If the child/student tires of the instrument, it is a lot easier to sell or store the neglected guitar in a closet.

Other than presets, few people really know how to work a synth let alone teach it.

And as mentioned, the coolness factor shown on music videos is a big factor.

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Post by hageir » Mon Sep 03, 2007 10:05 pm

I guess it only leads to one thing:
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Post by tim gueguen » Mon Sep 03, 2007 11:28 pm

Paolo Di Nicolantonio wrote:

What's interesting is that the very idea of SYNTH POP is much different from Europe to the USA. When I think of Synth Pop, I think of bands like Bronski Beat, Pet Shop Boys, Dead Or Alive, Depeche Mode, Human League, Yazoo, Duran Duran, Howard Jones, Nick Kershaw, New Order etc. etc. etc. etc.,

when I talk to an average Joe American, for Synth Pop they come up with "And I ran" by A Flock Of Seagulls (Whisky Tango Foxtrot?), "Whip It" by Devo (Whisky Tango Foxtrot??), and even Rush's "Tom Sawyer" (Whisky Tango Foxtrot to the nth power). All these tracks for me have nothing to do with synth pop, but more with classic, guitar-based rock.
"Tom Sawyer" obvoiusly not. But the other two? Yes, there is guitar on "I Ran," but the synth element is prominent, and technopop and New Wave tend to get conflated anyways. And Devo? Devo were pretty much the original US synth pop band. Conversely Duran Duran have as prominent of guitar parts as Flock of Seagulls did, not to mention John Taylor's very prominent basslines on the classic Duran tracks. Nik Kershaw's biggest US hit, "Wouldn't It Be Good," has a rather prominent horn part throughout, along with a noticeable guitar part. Lots of bass and some guitar on varous New Order cuts. IF synthpop means no guitars then you have to throw out a lot of what many folks would consider part of the genre.
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Post by differentbydesign » Tue Sep 04, 2007 2:45 am

micahjonhughes wrote:
differentbydesign wrote:Funny but before joining this forum I was under the impression North America was an electronic music wasteland!
I'm not sure how you got the idea of a wasteland. The US had so many major synth manufactures; Moog, Buchla, Sequential, E-mu, and Ensoniq; that there must have been considerable domestic demand for synths.

There has been and is electronic music here. From the past evidence can be seen in Detroit techno and house music. It is just that electronic music in any form has never caught popular interest. For example the techno/house crazy of the late 80s and early 90s never made the transition from underground phenomena to popular culture here in the US.
I said it was an impression not a reality! The styles of music you refered to I just dont listen to so I would have no idea if it is big in the US or Botswana.
When I think of US and Electronic music I think of Devo and not much else. Out of touch perhaps but the observation is still valid from where I stand.
I tend not to listen to US music outside of Jazz for the most part it just does not appeal to my ears. I am dot dumping on US Music it just is not something I have been exposed to. By way of an example I have heard of the band Rush but have never heard a single song in my life.

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Post by micahjonhughes » Tue Sep 04, 2007 3:57 am

Maybe furthering the point, Rush is a Canadian band.

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Post by Neonlights84 » Tue Sep 04, 2007 4:22 am

micahjonhughes wrote:I'll agree with my fellow N. American, electronic music is not very popular and never really has been here.

The weird thing is that electronics are all over our pop music. What would rap, R&B, or Brittany be without synths and samplers?

The issue in the U.S. is that synths are just not cool. The image of the guitar playing musician is so strong that few teens want to get a synth when they can get a guitar. We have Guitar Centers everywhere but no Keyboard Center or anything close. In the past few years with the revitalization of synth pop, you do see a few more kids taking some interest in playing keyboard but not many.
I agree, but would you really want it any other way? 8)
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