Vintage vs. New

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JSRockit
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Vintage vs. New

Post by JSRockit » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:05 pm

As a person who really doesn't use much Vintage gear, I was wondering why people buy vintage over new? I mean, I know some people on this forum have been using synths for many, many years...so they may have owned something for 20 years... those aren't the people I'm interested in because that is self explanatory. I would imagine nostalgia comes into play for alot of the older members...and that makes sense as well. Also, if an older synth has features that aren't in a new synth, that makes sense...

But how about people who buy a Moog Source over a Moog LP (about the same price these days) when the purchase isn't linked to nostalgia? Is it due to the fact the LP is being used by too many people and you want something different? Is it because you like older stuff and its simplicity?

For me, I buy newer stuff because I like midi, patch storage, etc. I like the older stuff... but ultimately, it doesn't work for me, and the way I work, as well as older stuff. Plus, I could really care less if my equipment has been used in alot of popular songs by name artists...just as long as they sound good to me. However, alot of people seem obsessed with this. I would imagine that is a huge reason people buy vintage.

I'm not trying to start a fight...just seeing why people love vintage over new for the sake of friendly conversation. I would love to own a EMS Synthi and a few others...but practicality always gets in the way.
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Post by space6oy » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:13 pm

simplicity.

newer gear is far more complicated. more difficult to learn. that's my excuse. and that's coming from a computer nerd who loves technology. i use current gear for recording and sound processing but love old instruments, be it keyboards or drum machines or guitars and basses. think the only forum i like newer instruments in is drums.

edit...just thought of how i am still new to the world of samplers but am probably going to be guilty of preferring newer gear in that genre too...

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Post by JSRockit » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:22 pm

space6oy wrote:simplicity.
I understand that...but I wonder if that is the only reason. I mean, that is why I love the CS01... can't get much more simple than that...without it just being a preset machine. I guess there is the sound argument as well...which is a huge argument. :lol:
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Post by Mpresev » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:25 pm

I like new because they don't go out of tune.. 8)

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Re: Vintage vs. New

Post by GeneralBigbag » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:32 pm

JSRockit wrote: Plus, I could really care less if my equipment has been used in alot of popular songs by name artists...just as long as they sound good to me. However, alot of people seem obsessed with this. I would imagine that is a huge reason people buy vintage.
That's what I'd assume, judging by the number of 'how do I sound like X' threads you see.
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Post by Jexus » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:45 pm

I like both.

Vintage - for giving me the opportunity to touch history. And for inimitable sound.

New - for giving me the opportunity to have fun & explore soundscapes throughout months. And for complex sound.

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Post by space6oy » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:51 pm

anyone have old and new drum machines to compare? about the only modern stuff i've experienced is an alesis SR-16 and the drums in a korg EM-1. what about stuff like a vermona or a machinedrum, are those as simplistic to use as the old rolands?

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Post by JSRockit » Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:53 pm

space6oy wrote: what about stuff like a vermona or a machinedrum, are those as simplistic to use as the old rolands?
Not really...because you can tweak alot more parameters in the newer machines and there is alot more in the way of synthesis on those newer machine... the MD more so than the Vermona. That said, they are still relatively simple and easy to use.
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Post by Psy_Free » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:01 pm

Personally, I tend to go for synths that I think sound good (obviously), and I can use in my setup. Whether they are vintage or new doesn't really figure as a key factor in my decision making. I have more vintage than new, because there are more vintage synths than new.

If they made MS20's today with MIDI, patch storage etc, I would buy one. If they had made JP-8000's back in the early 80's with CV/GATE & no patch storage, I would buy one.

Overall though I have to say that there are probably more interesting and 'better' sounding synths of a vintage nature than new. Also, a lot of the new synths that come out today are also trying to emulate (to some degree or another) various or even all aspects of various vintage synths, so there must be something 'right' about those oldsters.
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Post by RobotHeroes » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:02 pm

For the same reason a guitarist prefers a particular guitar. It's sound, character and feel. It's a musician and their instrument sort of bond that some people will never understand. You wouldn't buy a cheap Sams Club Fender if you really wanted a telecaster. At first you might because that's all that can be afforded but you still want the sound that you want. Not saying if you don't own an old synth you aren't a musician.

Before I came to this site I knew some people, not the average person, could hear the difference between analog and digital but I didn't know some people could actual identify a synthesizer by sound.

Why buy vintage gear when new stuff can do a billion things? Some people like to keep it simple and immediate. It's all about the sound, feel and aesthetics that a vintage synth has. New gear has it's own sound too though and even emulates old stuff. But personally I bought an MS20 because I didn't want to buy the software emulation with it's plastic controller. Sure the emulation can do a lot more but it's still an emulation. I'd rather have the real thing instead of faking the funk.

I def like new stuff because it's the evolution of the old and you can do a lot of stuff you would need a room sized synth to do.
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Post by space6oy » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:05 pm

i love faking the funk.
almost as much as i love robotheroes' website.

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Post by RobotHeroes » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:06 pm

Because it's neva gonna let you down? :wink:
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Post by MrFrodo » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:08 pm

I hope that I strive to cover the best of both worlds.

Vintage = innovations that set trends, historical significance, more likelihood of being handcrafted (as in the first few Prophets, Chromas and Minimoogs).

New = reliability, wide plethera of sounds, proven techniques, likelihood of customer interest.

Vintage and new both have their advantages.
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Post by micahjonhughes » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:15 pm

These are not the only reasons I prefer vintage but they are big reasons.

1) When I think of the sound a synth should make, I'm thinking of a vintage synth. Why get a modern reproduction of that sound when I can afford the real thing? I'd love a vintage tele but can't afford it. So I make do with my reissue.

2) The limitations or specialization of vintage synths leads to more music and less programming. It is easy to get lost in all the neat sounds modern synths will make but that does not, for me, result in any music getting created. It is great to be able to dial in a good bass on the Moog and go. Enough parameters/knobs to get a good sound, not to many that I tweak the sound all day.

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Post by ThinkTanx » Mon Nov 05, 2007 10:40 pm

I tend to go with newer synths because of reliability, the fact they stay in tune, etc.

There were days when I had a idea of all the vintage gear I wanted to buy, but over the last couple of years I have realized that a smaller setup just works better for me. I wouldn't really want to have a small setup that relied heavily on a couple of vintage synths because of reliability. Also, the Elektron gear can cover so many bases for me. You can't really find that versatility with older gear.

That being said, I would still like to add one nice vintage synth to my setup. Probably gonna do that at some point next year. MS-20 would be a possiblity. If I decide to step it up a notch, it'll probably be an ARP 2600.

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