The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

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colmon
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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by colmon » Tue Aug 18, 2015 6:01 am

here's one for ya micke, my absolute favourite piece of music from twin peaks, "dark mood woods"



any idea what synth / effects angelo is using here?

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Tue Aug 18, 2015 7:39 pm

Kinny Landrum did virtually all synth playing on "Twin Peaks" and he used both a Roland D550 string sound and a MKS-70 of his own devising to do
the dark string pads. He did use a Prophet T8 as his master keyboard, but he didn't actually recall using it for any sounds other than the wind.

Angelo used the Korg 01W "Analog String Pad" sound a lot (like on The Actor's Studio theme for instance), but that was after Twin Peaks.
"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by SeventhStar » Thu Aug 20, 2015 2:57 am

Micke wrote:Film scores that were primarly created on a Buchla modular system seem to be few and far between. In fact, just about the only one I know of is Barry Schrader's
electronic score to the sci-fi thriller/horror flick "Galaxy of Terror" (1981):



Suzanne Ciani used her Buchla 200 to score Lloyd Michael Williams' short film "Rainbow's children" (1975), but I can't think of any other feature-lenght film that
features the Buchla.
Thanks for that link, Micke. I just watched it! Last time I found this online it was only posted at 360 or 480. Rare for an older movie to be posted at 720P!

I always liked the poster art:

Image

A Buchla 200:
Image

It has an unusual touch input, keypad. It could have been used for part of the spaceship control panel, in the movie..

I find it interesting that Buchla and Moog simultaneously invented their own modular synthesizers in 1963.. Each having notable differences in timbre sound generation architecture.

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by genshi » Thu Aug 20, 2015 6:24 am

SeventhStar wrote:
I find it interesting that Buchla and Moog simultaneously invented their own modular synthesizers in 1963.. Each having notable differences in timbre sound generation architecture.
If you haven't seen it already, you need to check out the documentary "I Dream Of Wires" which is now available on Netflix. It explains the whole history of how and why Buchla and Moog approached their systems the way they did.

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Re: Video clips from "classic" movies featuring electr

Post by Micke » Mon Aug 24, 2015 6:53 pm

SeventhStar wrote:
Did you ever make a post detailing what synths were used for the Madman Soundtrack?

At first I didn't know what synths were used on the Madman soundtrack... but I do now :D

The score was primarly created with an Oberheim 4-voice, a large Buchla 200 modular, and there's also some samples from a Fairlight CMI I.

"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by SeventhStar » Tue Aug 25, 2015 9:18 am

Electric Dreams 1984.. Just watched this on the tube, tonight. I had not seen this movie since the 80s..

Giorgio Moroder worked on this soundtrack. Micke, might know the equipment he used for this one and the song he made for the movie, "Together in Electric Dreams".



Image

Image

Loving Virginia Madsen, in those vintage Levi's 501 jeans! :D

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Sun Aug 30, 2015 8:08 pm

Moroder did the instrumental underscore and two songs (Together in electric dreams and Now you're mine). The film also contains a number of songs from other artists/bands such as Jeff Lynne, Boy George/Culture Club, Heaven 17 as well as some classical pieces by Bach, Rossini and Tchaikovsky etc.

Arthur Barrow played synths and Fender bass on the two songs by Moroder. As far as Together in electric dreams is concerned, the Jupiter-8 does virtually everything synth-wise except the bell sound (DX-7) and drums (Linndrum).
Barrow also had a Serge modular, Emulator and an Oberheim Xpander at the time but I don't think he used them for these songs.




The instrumental underscore was performed by Gary Chang and his setup at the time included a Fairlight CMI
IIx, jup-8, PPG wave 2.3, a couple of Roland MKS-80's and a Linndrun II.




These are the only tracks from Moroder's instrumental score that made it to the soundtrack album.
"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Sun Sep 06, 2015 8:34 pm

Here's a little gem of an electronic/orchestral score by Craig Safan:



Los Angeles-based studio synthesist Michael Boddicker did the synth work and he always brought his own setup to the various recording
sessions he participated in. Some of the synths he used at the time (1980) included a Moog modular system, modified minimoog, Arp 2600 hooked up
to an Oberheim SEM module, custom Oberheim 6-voice, Polymoog, Prophet 5 rev 1, Yamaha CS-80 and a Bode vocoder.
"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Thu Sep 10, 2015 10:59 pm

I just realized that no one has mentioned Mark Isham's hybrid electronic/orchestral score to Never Cry Wolf yet (at least not in this thread).
The score is simply great!

Here's the opening scene accompanied by Isham's melancholy music:



You can listen to the complete 25 minutes suite from the score here:
https://soundcloud.com/openeyefilms/nev ... suite-mark

Synths used included a Prophet 5, ARP 2600 and Oberheim 2-voice.
"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Thu Sep 10, 2015 11:26 pm

My favorite Mark Isham score has to be the one he did for the horror flick The Hitcher (1986), awesome stuff!

"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Mon Oct 19, 2015 7:48 pm

Alan Howarth's synth-score to the supernatural thriller "Retribution" (1986) has finally been re-released on CD in expanded/remastered form.
I've been listening to the soundtrack repeatedly and I really dig it, quite possibly Howarth's best solo film score. This film was scored from
May thru October 1986, between working with Carpenter on "Big trouble in little China" and "Prince of Darkness". If you like those scores
(as well as Halloween IV) I'm sure you'll enjoy this one too.

Image
"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by tomorrowstops » Wed Oct 21, 2015 3:02 pm

Retribution is a solid listen. I haven't checked out the reissue yet, but will have to. I am a little more partial towards The Lost Empire, from a couple of years earlier (1984). The release I have contains both scores. What I really still need to do though, is watch both movies!

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Esus » Wed Oct 21, 2015 5:56 pm

Micke wrote:My favorite Mark Isham score has to be the one he did for the horror flick The Hitcher (1986), awesome stuff!

YES!!!!

My favorite cue is Cars and Helicopters:



And another personal Isham favorite is Skydive from Point Break:



Swayze did his own stunts!

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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Thu Oct 22, 2015 4:57 pm

tomorrowstops wrote:Retribution is a solid listen. I haven't checked out the reissue yet, but will have to. I am a little more partial towards The Lost Empire, from a couple of years earlier (1984). The release I have contains both scores. What I really still need to do though, is watch both movies!
As for "The Lost Empire", I recommend you get the expanded/remastered double CD because it contains the complete film score on CD1 and the soundtrack album on CD2.
Also, the sound quality of the new release has been improved considerably.
Last edited by Micke on Thu Oct 22, 2015 6:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The great thread of electronic/synthesizer soundtracks

Post by Micke » Thu Oct 22, 2015 5:28 pm

Esus wrote: YES!!!!

My favorite cue is Cars and Helicopters:

Yeah, that's a great track. It sounds like there are multiple sequences running at the same time and I guess the parts were made with the Prophet 5 w/polysequencer
in conjunction with the MC-4B microcomposer controlling the Oberheim 4-voice. Mark had a rackmounted 4-voice with a separate custom keyboard, and all the internal connections
of the SEM's were brought out to mini-jacks.
And another personal Isham favorite is Skydive from Point Break:



Swayze did his own stunts!
Very nice indeed. The overall style of this track somewhat reminds me of the main theme from the much earlier "Never Cry Wolf" (which I posted above).
"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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