October 16th, 1964

Discussions about anything analog, digital, MIDI, synth technology, techniques, theories and more.

October 16th, 1964: The birthday of Analog Synthesis

Yes
2
13%
No
12
75%
Very Debatable (please explain your thoughts)
2
13%
 
Total votes: 16

MrFrodo
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 952
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2005 9:29 pm
Real name: Eric
Location: New York, NY, USA
Contact:

Post by MrFrodo » Fri May 16, 2008 10:29 pm

I think that date is when analog synthesis first made its way in the direction of the masses. Don Buchla, Raymond Scott, Leon Theremin and all the others who made advances in that direction may count, but it was first in the hands of Dr. Moog that analog synthesis (or even the Theremin) gained commercial momentum.
The greatest thing we ever have is the will to survive.

Rest in peace, Dr. Robert Moog.

http://www.ericbenjamingordon.com
http://cdbaby.com/cd/ebgordon
http://www.myspace.com/ericbenjamingordon

User avatar
OriginalJambo
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2556
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 12:04 am
Gear: Check my sig
Location: Scotland, United Kingdom

Post by OriginalJambo » Sat May 17, 2008 12:11 am

MrFrodo wrote:Don Buchla, Raymond Scott, Leon Theremin and all the others who made advances in that direction may count, but it was first in the hands of Dr. Moog that analog synthesis (or even the Theremin) gained commercial momentum.
Exactly - the Minimoog changed it all. Funny thing is that Bob was initially against the idea, but when he realised his company would be toast pretty soon if it didn't start making money fast he had no other choice but to agree. Lucky for him it really paid off!

In fact the first Minimoog prototype had no input from Bob whatsoever. It had in fact been put together during lunch breaks by one of the engineers working in the factory.

User avatar
Johnny Lenin
Expert Member
Expert Member
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:56 pm
Gear: JX8P | AX60 | Little Phatty Stage II | DW8000 | Vox Jag | Fantom X6 | Juno-G | P-Bass | AS-120 | Double Jet

Post by Johnny Lenin » Sat May 17, 2008 4:01 am

I think this all goes to say that there was no single revelatory moment. Synthesizers come out of a long line of intersecting streams and technologies with significant moments along the way. The introduction of the first Moog modular is as good a date as any, as long as you qualify it by saying that there was a whole lot of stuff that went before.

As for Raymond Scott... Scott was a Theremin fan who hired Moog to build components for some of his instruments. I think that is significant because, by the time Moog got around to building his first modular, he had knowledge of Theremins, the RCA Mk. I and Raymond Scott's instruments.

Giants standing on the shoulders of giants.

User avatar
Phollop Willing PA
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 840
Joined: Sun May 04, 2008 3:47 pm
Gear: Korg, Moog, Roland, Alesis, ARP, Yamaha, Future Retro
Location: Nova Scotia

Post by Phollop Willing PA » Sat May 17, 2008 6:47 pm

Theremin concerts were quite popular in the 1920s - 30s.

Example:

Image

For me, 1919 was the start of popular electronica (when Theremin invented the Theremin).

And don't forget all those early film scores that use the Theremin.
MOOGSig: Voyager/Theremin, ROLAND: JP8000/MC505/MC50/SH1000/Octapad1/RE 20, CASIO VLtone, KORG: Prophecy/MS2000R/Kaos Pad2/D3200/D888/SDD4000/M3, BOSS SP202/DR110, YAMAHA:CS40M/QX7/WX7/QY10/Reface DX, ARP Exp, MACBETH M5, FR ORB, SONNET, ALESIS SR18

User avatar
nickeax
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed May 14, 2008 2:20 am

Post by nickeax » Sun May 18, 2008 6:48 am

This machine was mentioned in the Evolver manual. It's amazing!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telharmonium

Certainly pioneering work indeed.

Post Reply