The Moog Guitar is HERE!

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tunedLow
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Post by tunedLow » Fri Jun 13, 2008 5:17 am

Alright, let that be the last word on it, on know your ego's bruised, but let's just get over it. Joey's response was too harsh, but just drop it.

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Post by neandrewthal » Fri Jun 13, 2008 5:23 am

Edit: Screw typos, let the emoticon do the talking.

:roll:
Last edited by neandrewthal on Fri Jun 13, 2008 7:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Mooger5 » Fri Jun 13, 2008 6:11 am

hfinn wrote: The funny thing to me is the biggest complaint I've seen is about it's looks. There are quite a few ugly synths too, but if it sounds good isn't that what really matters most?
Well, not if looks play a major part in the performance. Not to sound preconceptuous nor anything vulgar, but isn´t the general idea keyboard players stay more or less static behind their rig while guitarists occupy the front stage and manage to communicate with the audience by walking around and, well, posing? So yeah, visuals are important to them and their fans. Take any picture of a stack of Moogs and Korgs and you will don´t know if they´re set-up for prog, kraut or tarnce, but if you look at a guitar with printed skulls, electrician´s tape or the Union Jack (not to mention Flying Vs, Explorers etc) you´ll pretty much guess the music genre. I think :lol: It´s understandable if noone wants to get caught holding the "wrong" guitar. Under this somewhat stereotypical view, complainers make a point.

Anyway, AFAIK there´s nothing saying that shape is definitive. If the guitar sells, no doubt there will be several editions appealing to everyone´s tastes, for marketing purposes of course. The recent Voyagers prove that Moog is well aware of that.
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Post by Dr. Sound » Fri Jun 13, 2008 6:41 am

WOW. :shock:

No disrespect to Amos or anyone else at Moog but I think this really misses the mark and could have filled a need and dominated it.

I have an ebow and some great axes and I have sustain for days.

I am almost shocked this was not the MIDI guitar controller to shut everyone up. The most expressive guitar controller to date to interface with the CV/MIDI pedal. That is something I would buy and use on a daily basis.
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Post by Joey » Fri Jun 13, 2008 6:55 am

for the record, my original comment was not directed at sensorium, and it was also in jest.

but it was just too funny to see him get so offended

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Post by Jack Spider » Fri Jun 13, 2008 9:04 am

Someone's been busy in here, so now it's time for me to get busy.

Joey & Sensorium - if you both have anything further to add, I'd appreciate it if it was done via PMs please.

For everyone else, please keep things civil in here - they're only opinions and none of them are necessarily correct. It would be a shame if I had to lock the thread and start issuing bans to members.
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Post by shopunit » Fri Jun 13, 2008 9:32 am

hfinn wrote:
shopunit wrote:I strongly dislike pointy guitars.
then you shouldn't buy it.

AMEN TO THAT!
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Post by Amos » Fri Jun 13, 2008 5:54 pm

sensorium wrote:If it didn't have the Moog logo on it, it would cost $1K
No offense but you have no idea what you're talking about. In all fairness, there's no way you could, since this product has just been announced and there aren't a lot of details in print. Here's a detail for you: The Moog Guitar contains over three thousand discrete analog components which allow it to do what it does. How many discrete analog components are in a Telecaster? Like, five?

Whether you think that what the instrument actually does with all that technology is "worth it" or not, is purely subjective and your opinion. There is no way to objectively quantify such a thing (when referring to an instrument that has more than a certain base level of inherent expressive potential; you could say that a rubber band is "worthless" as a bass guitar when compared to a Fender P, but that's not my point).

Anyway, my point is that while the guitar is very expensive, it's a limited initial release and part of the expense comes from the collectibility (like it or not), a very large part of the expense reflects the enormous cash outlay on research and development that was required to bring it into existence in the first place, and another very large part of the expense comes from the fact that it's a phenomenally sophisticated all-analog instrument containing thousands of discrete components.

So, now you know... :)
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Post by Johnny Lenin » Fri Jun 13, 2008 6:37 pm

Amos, thank you for your thoughtful reply and insight into Moog music. I really don't have an opinion on the instrument one way or another -- how could I, having never even touched one -- but the videos do sound very cool. And the superstrat-schechterish look isn't as bad, even thought I'm not a pointy guitar fan either.

What I'd be curious to find out is where Moog conceives this guitar will fit? What problem does it solve that can't be solved by other means? Like I said, I find the concept and sound interesting, but I don't get the logic.

I suppose, there is always the argument that it is pure innovation in search of an aplication, but innovations in music have rarely been made before the application, and those that have, have often been unsuccessful.

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Post by toad » Fri Jun 13, 2008 7:17 pm

This immediately comes to mind when people talk about 'infinite sustain':

:D

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Post by Dr. Sound » Mon Jun 16, 2008 8:18 am

after watching the videos again, I must update my original standpoint and say I am very impressed by the sounds and textures this instrument creates

can we expect a non "signature" edition with a lower price tag in the future?
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Post by Mooger5 » Mon Jun 16, 2008 10:20 am

I remember Michael Brook saying in an interview to Electronics & Music Maker he used the e-bow at one time but he quit for some reason, having invented the infinite guitar shortly after. I was intrigued by the concept and attended his concert at one of the Opal Evenings. Brilliant music, but by that time he was using the then new Casio MIDI guitar...

I think I still have that E&MM... under a ton of old magazines :?
What would be the reason he quit? I watched a friend playing the e-bow once, but I can´t remember if it´s possible to play chords... And you can´t arpeggiate with it, right?
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Post by Big Gnome » Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:51 pm

Mooger5 wrote:I watched a friend playing the e-bow once, but I can´t remember if it´s possible to play chords... And you can´t arpeggiate with it, right?
No, you can not play chords with an ebow; you can sort of play arpeggios, and with distortion, you can do an interesting representation of sweep picking, but it's not a particular strength of the device.
I've heard that they made a clunky prototype polyphonic ebow for Michael Manring, but obviously, no such thing has ever made it into production.

I for one think the Moog guitar looks amazing, in specification and aesthetic (it's really not that damn pointy), but it is at least three times what I could ever justify spending on an instrument.
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Post by Phollop Willing PA » Mon Jun 16, 2008 1:24 pm

Big Gnome wrote:
Mooger5 wrote:I watched a friend playing the e-bow once, but I can´t remember if it´s possible to play chords... And you can´t arpeggiate with it, right?
No, you can not play chords with an ebow; you can sort of play arpeggios, and with distortion, you can do an interesting representation of sweep picking, but it's not a particular strength of the device.
I've heard that they made a clunky prototype polyphonic ebow for Michael Manring, but obviously, no such thing has ever made it into production.

I for one think the Moog guitar looks amazing, in specification and aesthetic (it's really not that damn pointy), but it is at least three times what I could ever justify spending on an instrument.
In the 1970s, Lol Creme and Kevin Godley (of 10CC) invented infinite polyphonic sustain with their device called the Gizmo.

Here's a page explaining the device:

http://www.othermachines.org/blint/gizmo.shtml

and here's a picture of the bass version:

Image

and the guitar version:

Image
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Post by otto » Mon Jun 16, 2008 6:47 pm

So I was browsing the Tape Op forums and noticed they were talking about the new Moog guitar as well. They made a lot of similar comments about the ugly looks as well. What I did find interesting was that Moog was involved in the design of some active electronics for guitars and basses for Gibson in the 70’s. No sustain/mute functions though it does look like they were designed for sound shaping to some extent and were some of the earliest active pickups.
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