Rare Drum Machine Museum

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Rare Drum Machine Museum

Post by username » Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:54 pm

Hi,

I have a friend who has recently come into a lot of $$ and he wants to open a drum machine "museum" for the public/education etc.

Thing is, he doesn't really know a lot about gear/electronics etc, so he's tapped me to help him out. He's really just in love with the concept of it.

Anyway, I already know about the Roland's and Korgs of the world, but what other strange drum machines are out there that are lesser known?

Any help, links etc. would be really great. thanks!

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Post by Z » Sat Jun 14, 2008 4:04 pm


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Post by wiss » Sat Jun 14, 2008 4:16 pm

there used to be a drum machine muesum that was online only but I dont think its around anymore. It was based out of San Francisco.

I think you should do a book with lots of color pictures and then a DVD or CD that has a examples or two of what they sound like.

Take a year or two to do all the research....maybe see if Moog will let you copy Bob's desgin for a drum machine he made in 1960/70's that never went in to production....it was 6 foot tall.

there are publishing compaines that only publish music equipment related topics...I am sure they would love to put something out like that.

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Post by username » Sat Jun 14, 2008 4:30 pm

wiss wrote:there used to be a drum machine muesum that was online only but I dont think its around anymore. It was based out of San Francisco.

I think you should do a book with lots of color pictures and then a DVD or CD that has a examples or two of what they sound like.

Take a year or two to do all the research....maybe see if Moog will let you copy Bob's desgin for a drum machine he made in 1960/70's that never went in to production....it was 6 foot tall.

there are publishing compaines that only publish music equipment related topics...I am sure they would love to put something out like that.
wow! that's an excellent idea

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Post by Phollop Willing PA » Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:07 pm

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Re: Rare Drum Machine Museum

Post by Yoozer » Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:50 pm

username wrote:Hi,
I have a friend who has recently come into a lot of $$ and he wants to open a drum machine "museum" for the public/education etc.
That's a good way to lose a lot of money, quickly. The book would indeed be a better idea - and it would cost less, and be a lot more fun, especially if you'd combine it with a DVD full of samples.

Get a good DSLR, make a small studio (or better, hire an actually professional photographer), then go scouring eBay for machines in good condition. After the shooting and recording, sell it again.

Museums bleed cash, and drum machines are designed to be touched. What if a 5-year old spills his milkshake? What if buttons and knobs wear out? How do you determine how long someone's allowed to play with it?
"Part of an instrument is what it can do, and part of it is what you do to it" - Suzanne Ciani, 197x.

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Post by Mixolydian » Sun Jun 15, 2008 5:46 am

Bluesynths has a 3 part article on the Synthorama Synth Museum in Switzerland.

http://www.bluesynths.de/modules.php?na ... tent&id=91

http://www.bluesynths.de/modules.php?na ... tent&id=92

http://www.bluesynths.com/modules.php?n ... ent&id=113

I think you have to be a member of Bluesynths to view the site. The site is up, but not actively administered, (so joining may be a problem.)

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Post by MrFrodo » Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:54 pm

Yeah, I agree that drum machines alone wouldn't cut it. However, it mightnot be such a bad investment to create a live, multifacit ***Synthesizer Museum.*** Sure, you've got electronic exhibits in various museums across the United States, but no places completely dedicated to synths / electronic instruments.

There may not be any books dedicated to drum machines out there, but there are lots of synth publications and websites. No real museums. Do you think your friend has that kind of money, username?
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Post by wiss » Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:58 pm

I would buy the book, infact if I would invest some money in the book.
I would never visit the museum unless it was near.

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Post by Jexus » Mon Jun 16, 2008 6:42 pm

I've always been wondering how long would a synth museum last, a museum in which all the synths would be powered up and all sorts of visitors could play them :lol:

Without replacing the gear with new one of course.

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Post by Stalfosia » Mon Jun 16, 2008 7:42 pm

yep... I totally agree with the book idea...
I'd love to own a well made hard cover book with professional photos and info....
I wonder if having samples and such would be a problem, legally...
???

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Post by MrFrodo » Mon Jun 16, 2008 7:45 pm

That'd be interesting, writing a book with color photographs and a sample CD with LM-1, CR-78, 808 and 909 recordings.
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Post by Yoozer » Mon Jun 16, 2008 8:22 pm

Stalfosia wrote:I wonder if having samples and such would be a problem, legally...
???
Nope. The vintage machines aren't sold anymore and the newer ones don't sell less because there's a Nein Oh Nein in there (Battery 3).

It would be lovely if you had a photographer skilled enough to pull off that early 80's vibe like the pictures in the brochures :D.
"Part of an instrument is what it can do, and part of it is what you do to it" - Suzanne Ciani, 197x.

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Post by Blue Monster 65 » Tue Jun 17, 2008 5:02 am

There are tons of guitar and amp books out there that deal with this same sort of thing (I've got friends who have written the whole thing or shot photos for them), so I see no reason why it wouldn't fly.

And if they were your own samples, you can sell them however you want, so there you go.

You may wish to make it a collaborative effort, though. It would take some of the work off your hands and allow you greater access to different machines that you may not be able to purchase.

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Post by devetron » Tue Jun 17, 2008 5:03 am

I'm amazed that the EBOARDMUSEUM doesn't get more mention around here or anywhere for that matter.
http://www.eboardmuseum.com/
Check the highlights pages.
Antiquated web design, but that place must be INCREDIBLE.
synths

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