What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Discussions about anything analog, digital, MIDI, synth technology, techniques, theories and more.
Post Reply
username
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 48
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:16 pm

What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by username » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:31 pm

OK, so I've just been reading about the Genoqs sequencer and I can't help but wonder that it must be one h**l of a sequencer for $2k-3.5k - does it make espresso or something?

Please, will someone explain why it's do expensive and why it's so great? I mean I could seriously expand my doepfer rig for that kind of dough.

And the Octopus? That thing is way pricey man! What does it do that the Nemo doesn't?

droolmaster0
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 459
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 4:09 am

Re: What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by droolmaster0 » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:56 pm

Perhaps the best reference point for the pricing would be other current high end sequencers, and then also the dollar against the euro....

Currently the Schrittmacher, for instance (which is a great sequencer in its own right) goes for $1,999. hmmm - I could swear that it was up to $2,199 a few months ago, which might be a good sign as far as the pricing on some of this European stuff....the SAM-16 (a midi/analog hybrid) comes to about $2500 or so now, ordering direct from Germany.

The Nemo is also $1,999.

I haven't used the Nemo, but I have used the Octopus and the Schrittmacher, as well as some of the other currently available (or recently available) sequencers. I can't explain why all of these units tend to be so expensive (throw in the Zeit, and look at what a used p3 is going for also) - my guess is that way fewer people buy these things than buy high end synths, but I really don't know.

The Octopus differs from the Nemo mostly in the user interface. It's considerably bigger, and given that much of the coolness about the Genoqs stuff is the interface, and the visual interaction, I imagine that it's just easier to work with. In addition, for right now, the intertrack modulation works from top down within a page, and so the Octopus would have more of it. There are some new features in the new 1.6 firmware that have not made it to the Nemo yet, but I believe that they are pending.

I'm not sure how familiar you are with working with step sequencers in general, so I'm not entirely sure where to begin. I would suggest downloading the .pdf manual from the genoqs site. It will give you an idea of what the Octopus/Nemo can do. Much of the fun of working with their stuff is the way that everything is laid out, the abstract nature of the page/track structure, and the visual feedback that it provides you. For a pure feature list, nothing beats the p3 and its aux events, but that's a very different kind of machine. It's manual is also available online, as are (I believe) the Schrittmacher's, Zeit's, MAPS' (another interesting sequencer). The SAM-16 manual is not, but I wouldn't recommend that unless you have modular and midi gear, and know exactly what you're getting into.

As far as a price comparison - the Schrittmacher is great. Not nearly as feature ridden as the p3, but you can see all 16 events simultaneously on the screen, unlike the p3. Great for intertrack interaction - if you like different length tracks, modulating each other, it's a dream. You can't do as much of that on the Nemo right now, but other than that, the nemo has the entire (except for a few brand new features) Octopus feature set. I did have the Octopus and Schrittmacher simultaneously for awhile, and I just didn't use the Schrittmacher and sold it. The Schrittmacher is seldom updated, and the manufacturer is not known for its communication with users, whereas the Genoqs people are fantastic, update the firmware often, take user suggestions very readily, and even have the whole thing open sourced.

Just a bit of babble here, and I'm not sure if I really answer your question, because I"m not entirely sure why sequencer in general are more expensive than you might expect. But I would say that of the ones that I've used, the Octopus is my favorite overall (though it's hard to beat pure analog sequencers with modular synths).

username
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 48
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:16 pm

Re: What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by username » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:10 pm

Very cool. Thanks for the explanations. I will check out the octopus manual and begin organizing my plans to rob a bank later this week :)

BTW, I do have modular and digital (Mono and MD) hardware.

droolmaster0
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 459
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 4:09 am

Re: What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by droolmaster0 » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:26 pm

username wrote:Very cool. Thanks for the explanations. I will check out the octopus manual and begin organizing my plans to rob a bank later this week :)

BTW, I do have modular and digital (Mono and MD) hardware.
Well, the sam-16 is very cool but also incredibly expensive given that you really don't have multiple tracks (though you could argue that point). What's the most cool about it is that you can easily modulate the output in various ways, sequential switch audio or cv in various ways and cross fade the values, and that you can modulate midi values with cv input, essentially making it that rare cv to midi converter....if you were actually interested in one, I have a .pdf manual (sent to me by Sebastian Niessen who developed it) before I purchased one.

I can also answer specific questions about any of these sequencers (if I know them), either in this thread, or via pm.

btw, there are some cool Octopus 'tutorials' posted by a fellow on youtube - I believe he goes by 'ripe909', and has posted a bunch on HC under the moniker 'ripe'. He is definitely a power user.

ripe
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 6:24 pm

Re: What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by ripe » Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:32 pm

Yeah, thats me (ripe909).

I think that you have to look at the Octopus from a particular perspective. If you are used to X0X loop sequencing, or hardware sequencing, such as Doepfer Schaltwerk, Notron, Yamaha RM1X-RS7k, Elektron, Future-retro, you'll know exactly what limitations the Octopus *removes*. It is a breathe of fresh air... you have a huge, beautiful, blank canvas, where you can very physically interact with your composition.

For PC users, used to linear sequence recording, it isn't as compelling.

The closest thing to it for me was the Schaltwerk (I haven't used the Zeit, Schritty or P3) but the schalt was so limited in what it could do, it was called a percussion sequencer, because you couldn't set notes to be longer than 1 step!

Almost everything you would logically expect is there laid out in physical space, after awhile the interface becomes second nature (hence the lack of a display), and you learn the layout through muscle memory more than "thinking" about scrolling through menus. When you really need to, you can dig deeper and get to the guts of all the attributes and modifers, etc, but they don't get in the way of making music.

As for the price... look what you get, a huge beautiful piece of hardware with wood structure, hand fitted knobs, ball-bearing buttons, and active, personal support from the genoQs team, and you would be hard pressed to find any existing bugs. After building my own synth, I can't imagine how they were able to create such a boutique item and keep the where it is!

cheers
ripe

username
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 48
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 7:16 pm

Re: What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by username » Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:43 pm

Well, it sounds like this might be for me then. I have an MPC, Monomachine, Machinedrum and doepfer modular with the sequencer. I know how to use the sequencers on all of them with the MPC providing the most flexibility and intuitive programming. So far the Doepfer seq has been the most fun and inspiring, while the others seem to take up too much time to program. I want a sequencer that I can play like a real instrument instead of spending 5 minutes making music and then another 10 as an engineer. I've been making music for 15 years now and although I'm still relatively young, I've been through all types of DAWs, hardware etc.. and I hate to say it but I'm lately feeling uninspired (jaded?)

Anyway, I'm always looking for new ways to create music, so maybe this could be an avenue to pursue.

BTW, would you guys say its worth it to stretch for the Octopus rather than the Nemo? Judging from the vids, the Octopus looks friggin enormous!

Nice vids ripe909! very cool

droolmaster0
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 459
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 4:09 am

Re: What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by droolmaster0 » Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:01 pm

username wrote:Well, it sounds like this might be for me then. I have an MPC, Monomachine, Machinedrum and doepfer modular with the sequencer. I know how to use the sequencers on all of them with the MPC providing the most flexibility and intuitive programming. So far the Doepfer seq has been the most fun and inspiring, while the others seem to take up too much time to program. I want a sequencer that I can play like a real instrument instead of spending 5 minutes making music and then another 10 as an engineer. I've been making music for 15 years now and although I'm still relatively young, I've been through all types of DAWs, hardware etc.. and I hate to say it but I'm lately feeling uninspired (jaded?)

Anyway, I'm always looking for new ways to create music, so maybe this could be an avenue to pursue.

BTW, would you guys say its worth it to stretch for the Octopus rather than the Nemo? Judging from the vids, the Octopus looks friggin enormous!

Nice vids ripe909! very cool
If you really want to stay within the analog realm (I LOVE pure analog sequencers, myself) - you might check out the Modcan 54B. Really nice sequencer - of course, it doesn't do as much as an Octopus, but it does it in a very different way. I find it more pleasing to work with than the Doepfer, which I had for a bit.

ripe
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 6:24 pm

Re: What's up with GenoQs other than its pricetag?

Post by ripe » Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:27 pm

username wrote:and I hate to say it but I'm lately feeling uninspired (jaded?)

Anyway, I'm always looking for new ways to create music, so maybe this could be an avenue to pursue.

BTW, would you guys say its worth it to stretch for the Octopus rather than the Nemo? Judging from the vids, the Octopus looks friggin enormous!

Nice vids ripe909! very cool
I had been on a 5 yr musical hiatus because I was not inspired. The Octopus kick-started me to get back into it.
Unless portability is a real issue, I would stretch for the Octopus... of course I haven't used the Nemo, but I wanted a "no compromises" interface, especially at that price point. Maybe if you never use the Octopus you wouldn't know what you were missing with the Nemo?

cheers
ripe

Post Reply