I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

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Villi
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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by Villi » Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:56 pm

Yamaha RS7000, EMU Command Stations, Akai MPCs, Elektron Monomachine and the Alesis MMT8 are usually the most recommended hardware sequencers around here. Of course there are also more "boutique", and considerably more expensive, sequencers, such as the Genoqs Octopus.

As for DAW software you could always give Reaper a try. It's free to try without any limitations, and if you like it, very cheap to buy. And it has a midi sequencer.

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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by ~zenshin suru~ » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:53 am

Hi Savitar, let me break side-chain compression down to make it real simple. First, you need to understand what a compressor does. The 5 basic controls on a compressor that you'd want to use to achieve this affect are: 1. makeup gain, 2. threshold, 3. ratio, 4. attack (time) and 5. release (time). If you have ableton live or pro tools or any daw, you can set this up pretty easily. First take a signal that you want to compress, for example a pad sound. For this example, let's assume you're using a daw. Insert a compressor plugin that has a side-chain input like the compressor that comes with ableton live. once you have your pad sound going through your compressor plugin adjust those 5 controls and listen to what is happening. Take the threshold knob and move it so that the signal from the pad sound is triggering the compressor. When the signal from the pad reaches the threshold of the compressor, the compressor is now compressing that is lowering the overall signal level. the ratio, attack, and release knobs all effect how the compressor reacts once the signal from the pad reaches the threshold. the ratio is the ratio of compressed signal to the ratio of the would be uncompressed signal. think of it this way, if the compressor was not inserted, the pad sound would peak at -3dbfs for example, let's say you set the threshold somewhere around -9dbfs and the pad sound has a dynamic range of 12db, meaning, it's lowest level section of the pad sound registers your ableton live meter at -15dbfs. so once the pad level gets loud enough to reach the threshold of the compressor, the ratio now comes into play. if you have a 2 to 1 ratio, for every 2 db that level would have gone up past the threshold, with the compressor inserted, it will only go up 1 db. for this kind of side-chaining effect, you will want a higher ratio, but it is important to understand. now the attack knob controls how fast the compressor will kick in once the audio level of the pad reaches the threshold, how many mil. seconds it will take for the compressor to reach. the release is the same idea, it controls how long the compressor will take to "let go" of the signal after it has gone below the threshold. makeup gain simply raises the overall level to "makeup" for the level lowering effect of the compressor. so, quieter louds and louder softs = less dynamic range = louder souding. NOW TO SIDE_CHAINING... so once you understand these principles, your ready to try to sidechain. To do this, you will need another track in your daw besides the pad sound. For example, let's take a bass drum track. so, you've got your bass drum track and you've got your pad track that has a compressor inserted. now this only works if the compressor that your are using has a selectable sidechain insert (like the stock live compressor). click on that sidechain insert and select your bass drum track as the input to the sidechain. NOW, the bass drum track is triggering the THRESHOLD of your pad track, so adjust the threshold first until you can hear your pad sound lowering in volume when the the bass drum hits. adjust your attack and release to beat of song by trying to achieve a natural pumping of the compressor kicking in when the bass drum hits and then adjust the release so that the pad levels raises back up nicely when the bass drum goes away. that is in essence side-chaining. the lower your threshold, the higher your ratio, the more drastic the effect. blend to taste....

I am in Ca, and I'm trying to sell my Andromeda to fund some diy projects.. pm me if you're interested.

cheers.

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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by meatballfulton » Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:49 pm

You have to be kidding, I doubt much if any of that was done with analog gear. Sounds very digital and processed to me. You should be looking into softsynths.
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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by bionic muffins » Mon Jan 25, 2010 4:37 pm

if you want to do stuff like that dont get another synth, get ableton.


EDIT: ok, now i read page two. :o

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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by Arturo00 » Mon Jan 25, 2010 7:58 pm

I could've sworn I heard a Juno-like arpeggio in one of the songs.

I dig this stuff. I'm just finding that all this French Touch/French Electro is really starting to sound alike. One thing that I've always liked about this stuff though are all the micro samples thrown in there and the major attention to detail. I'd love to be able to do that in my own work, I just don't dedicate the time to gathering all the necessary samples. Patience is also key as I'm sure a lot of the intricate details are all done manually. And yes, side-chaining! side-chaining! side-chaining!

Any word on the drum samples (mainly the snare)? They sound identical to Justice/datA/any other French Electro I've heard. Is it a specific patch from a specific drum machine, or a sample? Can anyone shed some light?
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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by NB23 » Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:02 am

Sounds like a Ensoniq SQ-80 to me. Right down to the drums. Or any Ensoniq model they all sound similar.

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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by ontheyslay » Wed Jan 27, 2010 5:44 am

The drums on 7:46 sound just like the drums from my MidiboxSID. He does have that sort of lo-fi video game-esque sound too so maybe you could look into that.


http://www.ucapps.de

if you're interested

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Re: I need help figuring out the synths this guy uses

Post by themilford » Wed Jan 27, 2010 1:47 pm

Z wrote:I thought that compression technique was just some weird thing that Sirius/XM was doing with their "dance" stations, but I just it's actually the new "en vouge" thing to do like auto-tuning. All those songs are going to sound dated once that fad is over.

And, yes, it annoys me, too - gives me headaches when I flip to those stations.

@Savitar - Side Chaining is the use of an external signal to affect the level of a compressor. The most common use is a technique called "ducking" where an audio backtrack is set at a certain level and automatically "ducks" or loses gain when an announcer speaks over the music bed. Appearently, dance producers are feeding a kick drum signal to a compressor to produce a rhythmic audio "pulse".
So true... you will all cringe at these tracks someday. ;) just like we cringe at Don Johnson's pink sports-jacket and that gated reverb snare that ruined all those great metal albums from the 80s.

Anyway, another obviouse example of ducking is when you have a second mic on the bottom of the snare... this mic, annoyingly, will pick up the secondary action of the snares activating when the kick drum is hit... so if you side-chain the a gate or limiter/compressor to the kick you can get this annoying "ghost-note" to de-emphasize or go away completely.

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