Flipping gear

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Alex E
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Flipping gear

Post by Alex E » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:35 am

Have you ever started flipping gear quite a bit, and eventually found a setup you liked and stuck with it for at least a year? I feel like I've been flipping gear for years now, and I've lost a lot of money in the process since I f**k hate it when people jack up synth prices (I tend to sell them for a little to somewhat less than I bought them for, which I know is foolish).

I feel like someday I'll just be satisfied with whatever I have.
How about you?
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Stab Frenzy » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:06 am

I buy things and make music with them. :D

The 'perfect setup' doesn't exist, you've just got to use what you have. You might find one thing that works in a way that suits the way you work and hang onto it, but really what you need to do is just learn to use what you've got to its full potential and just make music. Trying to find the perfect setup is a false goal and distracts you from what you should really be doing.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Alex E » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:09 am

Hmm, so true.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by RD9 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:20 am

I think I went through exactly the same thing and I've finally reached a sweet spot where I can relax and think about the music more. There is such a thing as a 'perfect setup' (for lack of a better word), but it took me a lot of time to get there and find the right synths (and discover which synths I hate). For me it was part learning process of experiencing different synths (sound and workflow), and part learning about my own needs and focusing in a certain area. It depends on each person though. I think there are a lot of people out there for whom a 'perfect setup' will never be attained. And to some, the specific instruments don't even really matter. They can make music with whatever instruments they happen to have.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Sir Nose » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:23 am

I've kept most gear I've accumulated. A few pieces, things I thought I needed, were bought at a fair market price. The rest were a good to great deal. Some were picked up just because the price was so good and if I didn't like it or it wasn't a fit, I could flip it. Maybe, I just got lucky, I ignored most the things that I thought wouldn't work for me, or I am easily pleased. The few things I have flipped, I thought I might before I even purchased them. One I was pretty certain of. But, I knew I could sell them for a small profit (equal to the hassle) or sell them at cost near instantly. Oh yeah, the only things I've bought new have been cables and a lamp.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Ashe37 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:31 am

I've flipped some gear recently because i came into a bit of cash that let me buy an M3, so i made changes to my setup....

now i need to build a frikken desk.

And can ya believe some kid sold me a TG-33 for $75? :P

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by tom Cadillac » Mon Oct 25, 2010 12:08 pm

I'v gone through a lot of synths and I'v got better at making money when I sell with experience.

Some stuff is just so ultimate and useful that they stay put - Yamaha fs1r or Korg Z1 for instance. Even if I never get to programme them as deeply as they deserve, they just nail down certain sounds so well I need to have them available.

The cheaper and quirkier things I tend to keep, partly coz I'll make nothing selling them and also out of affection for their wierdness. A Korg electronic piano for instance and casiotones -

Then there's the stuff I'v really got into programing and using a lot, which tends to be a bit random, though it's usually the easier to figure out synths. A shared history and knowledge of how they work makes me keep them. A Yamaha SY22 for instance (though I mostly run it with a frostwave sonic alienator to give it bite). Zoom drum machines. Korg DW8000 etc...

I try and sell on as much as I can. And have probably sold more than half the synths I'v owned. But New Zealand is an amazing place for buying and selling synths. We have our own excellent internet trading site (not Ebay) and the market is subject to lots of fluctuations due to the small population.

It's samplers though that I use most and think I'll use the same ones till they break - particularly the Roland SP606. I guess they are more flexible and can fit different styles.

And as has already been said they're all just tools to make music. And its good to progress and change with the music you're making. So perfect set-up? Best to try and concentrate on a perfect song!

But buying and selling synths can be huge fun in itself. Though its not a particularly creative activity. :D
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by tallowwaters » Mon Oct 25, 2010 1:18 pm

Stab Frenzy wrote:I buy things and make music with them. :D

The 'perfect setup' doesn't exist, you've just got to use what you have. You might find one thing that works in a way that suits the way you work and hang onto it, but really what you need to do is just learn to use what you've got to its full potential and just make music. Trying to find the perfect setup is a false goal and distracts you from what you should really be doing.
+1, but this is not a popular sentiment here at vintagegearhorders.

I myself quite enjoy picking up a new piece of gear from time to time, but have had a 'central' set up for sometime that is composed of my essential pieces of gear. There are lots of 'peripheral' items that I pick up and (usually) later sell, but I keep my main gear and actually make music.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by colmon » Mon Oct 25, 2010 1:29 pm

i have two pieces of gear relevant to these forums at the moment which serve me extremely well

i love and am fascinated by synths and synthesizer history but this kinda used car salesman attitude to gear doesn't appeal to me in the slightest

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Solderman » Mon Oct 25, 2010 2:01 pm

Alex E wrote:Have you ever started flipping gear quite a bit, and eventually found a setup you liked and stuck with it for at least a year?......I feel like someday I'll just be satisfied with whatever I have. How about you?
Big fat NO to the first question. I feel that with the increased availability of rare items that would otherwise stay in a studio, flipping gear is partly responsible for continued demand, and if everyone who does this sells for profit with that kind of demand, prices can only increase. This is even true for the person who sold said item and later regretted doing so, and now wants possession of another one.

On the second question, I guess it depends on what you do with your gear. I'm just doing this for fun. If I eventually get bored with some piece, it's out if it sits around very long. But I don't buy enough gear for this to be considered flipping, and I never sell for profit. My modded stuff has stayed for the most part, but my mods most definitely are not professional quality anyway.

Another vote for "there is no perfect setup". Rather, you get an idea of how to use something in a project, either based on a sound you may recall, or because of some potential that exists via experimentation, and you simply either own this item or you want one. Maybe you can afford some item(s) just to play for fun and inspiration too.
I am no longer in pursuit of vintage synths. The generally absurd inflation from demand versus practical use and maintenance costs is no longer viable. The internet has suffocated and vanquished yet another wonderful hobby. Too bad.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by bhrama » Mon Oct 25, 2010 2:41 pm

Stab Frenzy wrote:Trying to find the perfect setup is a false goal and distracts you from what you should really be doing.
My case in point. Had a MD SPS mkII UW, hated the layout & traded. Bought both an 808/909, sampled sounds & sold. Now I need beats....still have my c**p-stick old BOSS beat makers. They got me to where I needed to be, and let me focus on more important things, like making effin music!

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by rhino » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:42 pm

Alex E wrote:Have you ever started flipping gear quite a bit, and eventually found a setup you liked and stuck with it for at least a year? I feel like I've been flipping gear for years now, and I've lost a lot of money in the process since I f**k hate it when people jack up synth prices (I tend to sell them for a little to somewhat less than I bought them for, which I know is foolish).
With ya. I get off on repairing a broken synth. I'll play with it for a while, but then sell it to buy another busted one.
Every now and again, one is such a pleasure to program and play that I keep it....for a while longer (lol).
Making a profit is not a concern to me at this point in my life. Altho fixing a Prophet would be.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by krzeppa » Mon Oct 25, 2010 4:47 pm

tallowwaters wrote:
Stab Frenzy wrote:I buy things and make music with them. :D

The 'perfect setup' doesn't exist, you've just got to use what you have. You might find one thing that works in a way that suits the way you work and hang onto it, but really what you need to do is just learn to use what you've got to its full potential and just make music. Trying to find the perfect setup is a false goal and distracts you from what you should really be doing.
+1, but this is not a popular sentiment here at vintagegearhorders.

I myself quite enjoy picking up a new piece of gear from time to time, but have had a 'central' set up for sometime that is composed of my essential pieces of gear. There are lots of 'peripheral' items that I pick up and (usually) later sell, but I keep my main gear and actually make music.
I think too many people strive for this so called "perfect setup." Frankly, I agree with you guys that it doesn't exist. People think that acquiring this piece of gear or that piece will fill in the missing piece of the puzzle. The problem is that in the process of doing all this, little to no music is actually made. You spend more time on the ebay/craigslis/etc searching for the Holy Grail...only to find it; use it; hate it; and sell it off for the next saviour. I have pretty much held on to everything I have, and as you really dive about as deep as you can into everything you own you begin to realize that creating the perfect setup has more to do with yourself than the synths. Don't get me wrong here, sometimes a new synth/drum machine/etc. may be needed; but more often than not you don't need them. So many synths are capable of doing almost exactly same thing today that many of the difference come down the user. So basically, I agree with Stab in that you should learn what you have inside and out. Once you have done that there really is little need to keep bringing gear in/out of the studio. Just my opinion, but what do I know?

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by tom Cadillac » Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:10 pm

Another thought... I still can't help hunting for interesting gear and possibilities. There's some amazing tech squeezing out of the sidedoors or behind the backs of the multicorps. The vestax faderboard for instance. I got mine new for about a 1/4 of the original price. Its such a wierd concept that no-one bought them.
I'm not striving for 'a perfect set-up', but I do live that treky "let's see what's out there!" enthusiasm.

(I must say with the faderboard, it's a severly undercooked realization. There's a youtube of the Japanese DJ genius who sold the concept to vestax. Which sold the board to me. Only he seems to be playing his proto-type development
model - not the strange thing I have. Still its rather amazing in different ways.)

And I'v just bought an alesis air fx with the idea that playing the wavedrum with sticks next to it will produce some amazing synchronized modulations.
:roll:
I hate the idea that an expensive new bit of kit is necessary to realize good music.

But being able to play around with the possibilities that open up with manipulating sound seems essential to producing better music. But I'm so glad to not have any GAS for another great synth to complete perfection. I actually rather prefer imperfect set-ups that are a struggle, but might realize something new.
"On the following day , the sorcery undespairingly continued: I changed my series, chose other sequences, cut other lengths, spliced different progressions, and hoped afresh for a miracle in sound." (Stockhausen)

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by th0mas » Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:14 pm

I recently went through my entire studio and sold all the little odds and ends I don't use. I ended up with enough $ to buy a mopho keyboard. (well, it will even out once I sell the remaining few bits). Whether the thing's worth $50 or $500 if you're not using it you should sell it. That's my opinion anyways, I have this stuff to make music not to covet.

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