Flipping gear

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by krzeppa » Mon Oct 25, 2010 7:50 pm

th0mas wrote: I have this stuff to make music not to covet.
I agree with that as well.....I think sometimes the GAS becomes more important than the music to some of us. We try to accumulate things so we can brag that we own X,Y, and Z synths. Having those synths isn't necessarily going to make you instantly good. You need to know how to use what you have to find out what you need.
If you can't make something work in your setup after working with it for a long time, then by all means get rid of the thing. I had a Nord Lead 2 for like 6 years. I liked it well enough, but I couldn't get what I wanted out of it in my mixes. After trying and trying, I think it only ended up making it into one track. So, I decided to get rid of it. No use taking up space with something that I don't need. I have friends who really wanted a Lead 2, and they thought I was crazy for getting rid of it. But if it is just sitting there collecting dust, what is the point of having it?

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by sequentialsoftshock » Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:11 pm

I ended up flipping a bunch of stuff before I found what I liked since it's not easy for me to try stuff without buying it online.
bonne chance

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by RD9 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:48 pm

sequentialsoftshock wrote:I ended up flipping a bunch of stuff before I found what I liked since it's not easy for me to try stuff without buying it online.
Similar story here. I wish there was a convenient way to try synths out, kind of like taking a car for a test drive before buying. Even if it's just for an hour at a showroom or store. Too bad most of the best synths are no longer in production.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by tallowwaters » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:01 pm

Perfection is a state of mind. I have the 'perfect' set up because I know how to quickly use all of my gear to make the music I want to make.
Brains can be used like a "stress ball," but only once.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Old Iron Giant » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:49 pm

sold everything I had, and kept just a few that I like to cover the basics. (V/A synth, rom synth, midi groove box, sampler, effects).

whats left of my collection is this: my perfect setup,
Virus ti2 & Virus B indigo - main
microKorg - vocal FX
Emu - ESI 4000 - samples
Alesis QS7.1 - pads / FX
Emu - XL7 - Midi
Alesis Quadraverb FX
Mackie 1402 mixer
Mackie m1400i amp
Muto Ultralite mkIII interface.

and that's my whole setup. small, sweet, and easy :)

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Solderman » Tue Oct 26, 2010 12:04 am

I'll never have the perfect setup, because like Tallow says, it's a state of mind, and I always want more than any one piece can deliver, and any of them can be combined into numerous setups, none of which give you everything. Plus some of them, like the 303 and Polivoks are a pain in the a*s. One tolerates the bullshit to get some good stuff out of it. The fruits of this ordeal make them worth keeping, imo, if you just take for granted it's quirky gear.

I can't imagine "quirky gear" being a selling point, can you? Perhaps if you enjoy the abuse.
I am no longer in pursuit of vintage synths. The generally absurd inflation from demand versus practical use and maintenance costs is no longer viable. The internet has suffocated and vanquished yet another wonderful hobby. Too bad.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by ninja6485 » Tue Oct 26, 2010 12:56 am

Solderman wrote:I'll never have the perfect setup, because like Tallow says, it's a state of mind, and I always want more than any one piece can deliver, and any of them can be combined into numerous setups, none of which give you everything. Plus some of them, like the 303 and Polivoks are a pain in the a*s. One tolerates the bullshit to get some good stuff out of it. The fruits of this ordeal make them worth keeping, imo, if you just take for granted it's quirky gear.

I can't imagine "quirky gear" being a selling point, can you? Perhaps if you enjoy the abuse.
:agree: i know the things i would consider selling, and i know the things i want to hold onto for a wile, but i've never had a desire to find a "perfect setup." i'd buy (and did buy) quirky gear, but it has alwayse lead to quirky sounds and/or satisfying programing thus leading to quirky sounds. quirky gear that's more trouble than it's worth... :? who knows.

i guess choosing gear is like choosing between working with water colors, patels, oil paint, etc. green is still green, but it's texture and over all impression changes with each selection. that, and you usually don't buy all of the colors you use in a given piece, you get a nice group and then you mix them. maybe some time later you get some new colors and stop using something old. it happens. it's art. it just so happens that synths are more collectible than tubes of paint!
This looks like a psychotropic reaction. No wonder it's so popular...

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Automatic Gainsay » Tue Oct 26, 2010 1:12 am

All the synths I own and have owned have been a sort of "flipping," but not for money, really.
I started with a couple of $200 analog synths I bought, which increased in value... and went on from there. All the synths I bought were synths I thought might interest me. I would keep them for as long as I thought that was the case. At the point at which I realized that they weren't inspiring me or serving a specific function in my studio, I would sell them to buy others. I was lucky because they kept increasing in value, allowing me to move towards more functional or better sounding synths.

Eventually, I got to a "perfect setup" sort of situation... where after using many many synths, I first of all discovered what I truly wanted in synths... what sounds I wanted, what functionality I wanted, and what interface I wanted... and kept the synths which fit those needs.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Solderman » Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:22 am

Alright then. No one has said it yet, so I'm gonna. Say you buy some beautiful rare bit of kit, there are only a few dozen in existence. You don't spend any time with it at all, don't even give it one week of love; you've just bought it to turn around and make yourself a small pot, and the person who could have really enjoyed it and made beautiful music with it can no longer afford it and has to buy a Bontempi or some s**t:
If that's what you do, then you are a capitalist, not a musician, and you make me want to grab a baseball bat and go to town on your face. Then you can sell all your teeth to the tooth fairy. Or cash in your life-insurance policy, whichever.
I am no longer in pursuit of vintage synths. The generally absurd inflation from demand versus practical use and maintenance costs is no longer viable. The internet has suffocated and vanquished yet another wonderful hobby. Too bad.
--Solderman no more.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by tallowwaters » Tue Oct 26, 2010 4:24 am

Solderman wrote:Alright then. No one has said it yet, so I'm gonna. Say you buy some beautiful rare bit of kit, there are only a few dozen in existence. You don't spend any time with it at all, don't even give it one week of love; you've just bought it to turn around and make yourself a small pot, and the person who could have really enjoyed it and made beautiful music with it can no longer afford it and has to buy a Bontempi or some s**t:
If that's what you do, then you are a capitalist, not a musician, and you make me want to grab a baseball bat and go to town on your face. Then you can sell all your teeth to the tooth fairy. Or cash in your life-insurance policy, whichever.
What's wrong with making money? Am I a bad person for investing money in markets and making more money when clearly lots of people that have the same ability to do so don't and rightly go without? By that reasoning, nobody should have jobs, families, or even internal organs since somebody else could clearly be putting any of those to better use.

Anyhow, I believe there a few governments are founded on this belief, rife with various pestilence and plague, maybe you would like it better there, great arbiter of inanimate objects...
Brains can be used like a "stress ball," but only once.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by memory cords » Tue Oct 26, 2010 6:05 am

Solderman wrote:Alright then. No one has said it yet, so I'm gonna. Say you buy some beautiful rare bit of kit, there are only a few dozen in existence. You don't spend any time with it at all, don't even give it one week of love; you've just bought it to turn around and make yourself a small pot, and the person who could have really enjoyed it and made beautiful music with it can no longer afford it and has to buy a Bontempi or some s**t:
If that's what you do, then you are a capitalist, not a musician, and you make me want to grab a baseball bat and go to town on your face. Then you can sell all your teeth to the tooth fairy. Or cash in your life-insurance policy, whichever.
I agree with you 100% Solderman, those people make me sick.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by wiss » Tue Oct 26, 2010 6:46 am

I enjoy flipping gear, but it can become stressful, it's a great way to try out new synths or drum machines. I've had some bad flips, good flips, and some that I have just flat out regretted and will cry if I think about it.

I'm pretty much done flipping gear......I'm sold on my MPC5000(though I would trade it for an XBASE 888), Roland Paraphonic, and debating the last synth.
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Re: Flipping gear

Post by Old Iron Giant » Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:48 am

@ Solderman - your right about one thing. owning the perfect setup is a state of mind.
I'm happily content with my setup, and feel no need to improve what I own.

nothing rare, or extravagant in my list. just a few keyboards that keep me happy, that I'm familiar with and enjoy paying. :)
no need to be greedy for more lol

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by code green » Tue Oct 26, 2010 1:50 pm

Solderman, I'm a musician whose happy with a good bit of socialism and I don't think you make sense. Ok, fine--if you acquire and then flip a synth for profit, you're a capitalist and not a musician (what, you can't be both? What, musicians are supposed to live on air, like orchids?)...but if you're truly a musician, why the h**l do you need some ultrarare bit of kit to make music? If you're really a musician, the kind who I'm guessing you'd think is "worthy" of said kit, you'd be able to make beautful music with a stick and a pot, much less the hundreds of non ultra-rare synths available to you. Stevie Wonder, presumably, would be such a musician, and he plays a Yamaha workstation on stage. We know the synths he has or has available to him, and yet he--with his subtle hearing--apparently doesn't give a fig about the "ultrarare" aspect...which is to say your defense of "musicians" comes across as nothing so much as the rant of a frustrated, envious collector. The ugliness of it further undermines its coherence--to profit off a synth is an unspeakable crime but to rob someone of his teeth or life is excusable?

Check yourself, my (solder)man.

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Re: Flipping gear

Post by memory cords » Tue Oct 26, 2010 2:15 pm

code green wrote:Solderman, I'm a musician whose happy with a good bit of socialism and I don't think you make sense. Ok, fine--if you acquire and then flip a synth for profit, you're a capitalist and not a musician (what, you can't be both? What, musicians are supposed to live on air, like orchids?)...but if you're truly a musician, why the h**l do you need some ultrarare bit of kit to make music? If you're really a musician, the kind who I'm guessing you'd think is "worthy" of said kit, you'd be able to make beautful music with a stick and a pot, much less the hundreds of non ultra-rare synths available to you. Stevie Wonder, presumably, would be such a musician, and he plays a Yamaha workstation on stage. We know the synths he has or has available to him, and yet he--with his subtle hearing--apparently doesn't give a fig about the "ultrarare" aspect...which is to say your defense of "musicians" comes across as nothing so much as the rant of a frustrated, envious collector. The ugliness of it further undermines its coherence--to profit off a synth is an unspeakable crime but to rob someone of his teeth or life is excusable?

Check yourself, my (solder)man.
I think what Solderman means is that you should sell things for around the same price that you paid for them. If that is what he means then I agree with him.

I've met people who have sold things for five times the price that they bought them. Personally I think that is immoral.

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