Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by mharris80 » Tue Jun 19, 2012 11:22 pm

Bitexion wrote:How could these musicians afford these mammoth-sized modulars? They must have cost more than a house!
We always say that choosing musician as a way of living is a path to disappointment and little money..
Keep in mind at the time they were doing something new and exciting. The record companies knew that "new and exciting"=$$$$, so they were more willing to throw cash their way. That's just my theory, anyway.

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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by Bitexion » Tue Jun 19, 2012 11:52 pm

True enough, using synths nowadays usually means playing sampled acoustic instruments or emulating those oldschool monster synths. Hardly much innovation anymore.

I mean, Tangerine Dream innovated using lots of sequencers. Nowadays when someone does it, they get "oh, it sounds alot like TD!". Jean-Michel Jarre innovated using synth effects on pop music, or guitar effects on strings. Now that's "the jarre sound". Wakeman, Rush, Genesis innovated using keyboards with heavy rock music. New analog and virtual analog synths emulate filters and oscillators from 70/80s synths.
Everything we do is someone elses idea, kind of. But we still love doing it of course.

Even modern prog rock, progressive rock ,get most praise for sounding like 70s bands.

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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by cornutt » Wed Jun 20, 2012 4:38 am

The original mashup synth, Max Crook's Musitron, from 1960:

Image

Read about it here:

http://www.delshannon.com/maxmusitron.htm
Switches, knobs, buttons, LEDs, LCD screens, monitors, keys, mice, jacks, sockets. Now two joysticks!

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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by Micke » Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:51 pm

Bitexion wrote:How could these musicians afford these mammoth-sized modulars? They must have cost more than a house!
We always say that choosing musician as a way of living is a path to disappointment and little money..
As far as Casey Young is concerned, I really don't know how he could afford all that stuff.

Anyway, Casey's first big rig (circa '76) was no slouch either:

Image
Casey used this rig on a lot of session work in Portland, Oregon - eg sessions with Elton John , Pleasure , Oregon symphony,
Jeff Lorber and a few others ...dave brubeck (live)...
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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by Bitexion » Wed Jun 20, 2012 10:03 pm

Are those lots of ARP2600's?

They were not cheap back in the day either, no.

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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by tim gueguen » Wed Jun 20, 2012 11:23 pm

How did they buy that equipment? Most of them likely went into debt buying the gear, then worked like madmen to pay it off. I suspect there are more than a few musicians from that era that tried the same thing but didn't have the same success, and ended up bankrupt.
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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by Micke » Thu Jun 21, 2012 12:08 am

Yep, five ARP 2600's plus a couple of ARP sequencers, Oberheim DS-2 sequencer, Minimoog, micromoog, Oberheim SEM & 2-voice.
"The (Yamaha) CS-80 is a step ahead in keyboard control, and a generation behind in digital control" -- Dan Wyman, Jan 1979

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Re: Geddy Lee Oberheim Moog mashup synth

Post by Bitexion » Thu Jun 21, 2012 2:23 am

Jees, and just one 2600 would cost 5-6000 or more? Back in 1976 that was ALOT of money.
Guess that's why he worked with so many contemporary artists, to pay off that huge debt. Also a plus that you have to rent the guy aswell to operate the darn thing :)

I laughed when I saw Fame with my synth-weary goggles, and saw the "cool keyboard guy" drag in all his hi-tech gear for the school audition. An ARP2600 and several huge keyboards to impress the teacher, who obviously detested these electronic abominations pretending to be an orchestra. Then he short-circuited the entire school when he inserted a patch plug in the 2600 :P

But the funny part was that a kid who wasn't even a student would afford that kind of gear.

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