Reliability of synthesizers

Discussions about anything analog, digital, MIDI, synth technology, techniques, theories and more.
User avatar
musden
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:34 am
Real name: den
Gear: radikal technologies accelerator
Band: aipracs

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by musden » Mon Nov 26, 2012 10:02 am

Actually it is very interesting to read all that! Than you!

It seems Yamaha DX7 was very good product indeed! :)

Ok, I can add something from my very last experience.

Recently I sold my old Polivoks. I dont know what to say good about it, because my particular one was very bad, starting from keys and going to the filter issues. But interesting thing - my buyer got this synth from transport company in condition that was worse than I had had when sent it. This company somehow managed to make a dent in it or smth like that. Anyway, the case of this synth is very good. And one more. Surprisingly it held its pitch very well!

M-audio Venom. It seems stable, and I think biult quite well (it got plastic case), but keys are not good/ And despite of not very bad modulation possibilities I dont like it. As far as I know it is impossible to make some proper synthesis using just knobs on the front panel, because there are no submenus and so on. Actualy you have to use your computer to go deeper.

I like that fact that Tempest biult properly. It is because I'm going to buy this synth sometime.

User avatar
Phenom
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 161
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 10:40 pm

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Phenom » Tue Nov 27, 2012 6:05 pm

reliability hasn't been much of an issue for me, a minor annoyance from time to time, but most synth I've owned have been well behaved. The few issues I have encountered are...

Yamaha rubber buttons on SY series synths, quite poor quality.

808 start-stop button. Mounted quite loose but manageable. I think this is common to all 808s.

Korg M1 buttons, never seen an M1 without a few of those cute little buttons having developed some stickiness.

Only synth that has ever crashed on me MS2000, but I tend to use very simple synths, so I'm sure crashes are I bigger problem on synths than I've experienced.

Occasionally dusty sliders and repatching on Juno 60, but fine after a quick move about that always fixes them. The JD800 is a lot worse for this, and not just because it has so many more sliders to correct!

D20 was a basket case, constant electrical problems.

ESQ1, was never the most reliable synth even when new. Regular problems for a friend who had one. I could always tell when his ESQ1 was buggered again, cos the music shop always gave him an SQ1 to get him by.

My Peavey DPM3 I had during the 90's developed a very sticky keyboard, good feeling keybed but not a great design.

The best build quality on any synth I own right now is the Roland SH2. good quality casing and panel hardware etc. Good access, clearly designed with servicing in mind. They really don't build cheapo synths like that anymore....

User avatar
cornutt
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2117
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 6:03 am
Gear: 6th
Location: Rocket City USA
Contact:

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by cornutt » Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:35 pm

Phenom wrote: The JD800 is a lot worse for this, and not just because it has so many more sliders to correct!
That's interesting, because I've never had a problem with sliders on my JD800. Mine's never been gigged, though, and it's only been moved a few times. Other than the dying aftertouch that is typical of Rolands of this vintage, I've never had a problem with it.

My Juno-106 was gigged when it was new, and I've had to fix a few things over time: cleaning up a noisy filter cutoff slider and a noisy master volume control; replacing a jack that got broken when somebody stepped on the cable that was plugged into it. And yes, I'm fighting the 80017a battle too; I've replaced two so far, and I've got another one that's starting to act up. And there was the time I had to clean the blood off of the keyboard. :shock:

I've had good luck in general with synth and other gear reliability, but I don't gig. I had to replace the display backlight on my Kawai K5m, which is typical. The case of that beast goes together like a jigsaw puzzle, and every time I have to open it, it gets a little more distorted and when I put it back together one or two more of the screw holes won't line up. It now only has about half of the case screws that it had originally. I've got an E-mu Morpheus with a flaky display, and an Oberheim Matrix-6r that is probably going to be needing a new 3396 because the filter on one voice won't stay in calibration for very long.

My least reliable (and generally most disappointing) synth was a Yamaha CX5M. After I'd had it for about two years, a capacitor in the power supply blew. I fixed that. Then, a couple of years later, a resistor in the power supply burned up and damaged the board. I fixed that too. Shortly after I put it back together, somehow a daughter board that was soldered into the CPU board broke in half. It was made of very thin material, and I guess it cracked and propagated over time. There was no way to fix it. I still have that synth, in pieces in my attic.
Switches, knobs, buttons, LEDs, LCD screens, monitors, keys, mice, jacks, sockets. Now two joysticks!

User avatar
Bitexion
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 4230
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2005 7:43 pm
Gear: Alesis Andromeda A6
Roland D-50
Creamware Minimax
Yamaha DX7s
Analogue Systems modular
Ensoniq SQ-80
Waldorf Blofeld
Location: Drammen, Norway

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Bitexion » Tue Nov 27, 2012 8:10 pm

I've had very good luck with my vintage synths, not ONE has been faulty. And I've owned quite a few, both 80s digitals and a few 70s synths. My MS-10 came with no connection between the keyboard and synth, though. I thought it was broken, until I started playing with the modulation and filters and realized it was making sound, it was just the keyboard that didn't trigger the synth. Sent it to a repair guy and he said the cable between keyboard and synth was broken.

That's basically the only bad experience I've had with old synths. I'm amazed that my D-50 still works like a charm after all these years.

I even had a Juno-106 for a couple of years with no voice chip issues.

User avatar
Alex E
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2235
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:07 am
Gear: Jupiter-6, DX7, TX7, Juno-106, AX60, Pro One, S1000, M1r, Live 9, iMac MC309XX/A
Location: Anaheim, CA

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Alex E » Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:19 pm

Some honorable mentions:

1) Build quality:
Siel DK-600. This is a machine I bought freshly serviced, and they did a good job, but I ended up having to service it myself again. The ribbon cables are the biggest culprit.

Juno-106: Yeah everyone knows about this one. Happened to mine too.

JP-8000: It has this weird fuzzy paint that scratches way too easily. It also wears off on the corners.
On top of that, the sliders/knobs can wear out or break. It wasn't all bad, but the build quality on this one was just okay.

D-10: I tried to fix this because it was almost free and I was bored, but goddamn what a mess mine is.

2) stability of OS
I had an EPS for a while and really pushed it's sound mangling possibilities to the limit. Unfortunately, it didn't seem to like mangling sounds and it would often crash or glitch out. Meh.

On the flip side, the ESQ-1 might have the best operating system I can think of. My only complaint is that parameter changes are not updated until you hit a key. They did change that in the VFX though. And again, the VFX has a similar OS. Ensoniq did that kind of thing very well.
soundcloud.com/vectron


User avatar
rhino
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 2610
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2008 5:00 pm
Real name: bill
Gear: keepers:
Kurzweil K2500x
Ensoniq TS-12
Yamaha SY-99
Alesis QS-8
Roland JD-800
Roland JX-10
Akai AX-80
Ensoniq SQ-80
Korg DSS-1
Moog Mini
Fizmo
Location: kentucky hills

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by rhino » Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:48 pm

YMMV. My Ensoniq SQ80 was bought in 1987 from the original owner. Has had two batteries and the OS upgrade to 1.8
NEVER FAILED or crashed. EVER. This includes outdoor gigs in freezing rain, broiling sun and running on portable generators and even an AC inverter hooked to a car battery.

DAMN !!! I wish the company hadn't tanked.. What they might be today...
When the wise man points to the stars, the fool looks at the finger.
- Confucius

User avatar
Alex E
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2235
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:07 am
Gear: Jupiter-6, DX7, TX7, Juno-106, AX60, Pro One, S1000, M1r, Live 9, iMac MC309XX/A
Location: Anaheim, CA

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Alex E » Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:54 pm

rhino wrote: DAMN !!! I wish the company hadn't tanked.. What they might be today...
AGREED! What a shame.
soundcloud.com/vectron


User avatar
mpa1104
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 330
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2005 3:33 am
Gear: Finally, enough gear that exceeds the 150 character allowance. WooHoo - I qualify as an obsessed gear-head!
Location: SOMEONE GET ME OUT OF HERE!!

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by mpa1104 » Wed Nov 28, 2012 12:43 am

rhino wrote:DAMN !!! I wish the company hadn't tanked.. What they might be today...
Thirded - I've always found Ensoniqs to be very comfortable from a playing and programming POV. Whilst they may have played it relatively safe with their basic synth architecture, they managed to do some pretty cool things with wavetables.

My synth experiences follow FWIW. Oh and a caveat re what I write about key action. Yes I can be detailed about how they feel, but I'm generally rather more sanguine about whether I like playing them or not. I've noticed over the years that I seem to be a little less picky about key action than some others. My professional peforming work has had me playing numerous different pipe organs around the globe (and harpsichords but less so), so I can't afford to be overly fussy about key action since in those circumstances you have to take what you get and just go with it!

Juno 6 / 60: Never had an issue with build quality. Sure a few nicks and scratches but it's never failed on me once. Keyboard is simple and easy to play - no velocity or AT so they're basically just switches, but they travel well and are not springy or annoying.
DW-6000: Pretty much same as above re key action, but build quality is nowhere near as tough (too much plastic) and it wasn't as much fun to program.
Prophet VS: Build could have been a little better, don't like it when synths "flex" a little if you pick them up differently! Key action not really a problem, just a shame about the failing AT, and parts of the casing on mine rattle when you play certain registers (I've tightened any loose screws I could find!). Would not part with it though.
Poly 800ii: Build okay for an all-plastic, but it almost felt too light. Key action ordinary and inoffensive.
D-10: Felt solid without being a tank, key action no problem, velocity quite responsive (and adjustable I seem to recall).
a-Juno 2: Build feels fragile to me (again, don't like the flexing case). Key action reasonable but AT failed too easily.
The Ensoniqs! ESQ-1, EPS, ASR-10: Very nice boards all of them. All solidly built (ASR particularly, notably heavier than the other two). Did experience early OS issues with EPS and ASR but, the final upgrade stopped that). Key action on all three very comfortable and among the most secure I've played (original EPS probably the most "sure" of them). Velocity on ESQ a little less responsive than EPS and ASR. Poly AT on EPS and ASR is excellent and highly responsive - best I've played (equal to the responsiveness on the Yam GX-1).
MicroMoog: Build is quite solid for a small synth. Keys, just switches, clicky but nice!
RS-202: Solid build, smooth key action (comfortable "waterfall" keys)
MKB-1000 (Roland 88-note weighted MIDI controller): I think my Rhodes piano is a little heavier than this bugger ... maybe. This is as solid as they come and with plenty of real estate on the top for a second synth, or indeed a troupe of cabaret dancers. Key action is also secure (and even comfortable for me who isn't as accustomed to weighted piano action).
Triton Le: It's my impression that the overall build and appearance belies what's under the hood as I get a lot of use from this ROMpler. It could be more solid (and I'm not fond of convex end-cheeks) and this is one of the few key actions that occasionally bugs me. When you play the Triton Studio and then this, you'd think it was a different manufacturer. Even semi-weighted would have been nice, and the AT on the Le (mine anyway) is rubbish - it's basically on/off no matter how you alter the responsiveness.
V-Synth: Everything the opposite to the Le! Build quality is excellent and key action and responsiveness (velocity and AT) is really nice. Not to mention that sonically, it's a serious kick-arse synth!

Mentioned the GX-1 in passing earlier. My all-too-brief time with this beastie has not faded much from the memory, it was a most stunning instrument. All parameters were an arm reach (and a sporadic lunge) away and the key action was very responsive. As you sat, nothing moved under your hands (and feet) except that which was supposed to, ie, the superbly responsive key action with velocity, AT, and that side-to-side "wiggle" AT (which was really quite amazing)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
It doesn't matter if you don't like my personality, I have several more.

User avatar
Pro5
Expert Member
Expert Member
Posts: 1000
Joined: Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:30 pm
Gear: OB-6 | SH-2 | JX-3P | JD-800 | Performer
Location: U.K

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Pro5 » Wed Nov 28, 2012 12:44 am

Phenom wrote: Only synth that has ever crashed on me MS2000, but I tend to use very simple synths, so I'm sure crashes are I bigger problem on synths than I've experienced.
It's not a common thing, the MS2000 is well known to have glitches and their mainboards often die (well, a component on them) I think i've seen more dead ones of those for sale than any other synth.

From what i've owned I can find some things to watch out for - Yamaha generally are the best engineered, well thought out and built for a long service life. Roland seem to change with the wind, great design and thoughtful engineering but often they have one or two achilles heels (you can see this in their schizophrenic search for a 'good keybed' throughout their synths versus yamah sticking with basically the DX7 style on their flagships for years because it just works), korg is (sorry WAS) the worst quality of the big 3, aside from keybeds - sharing yamaha keybeds for years if not still? and have improved on their flagships.

Here's my list/thoughts on the synths I've owned. Common faults. I've stripped down almost every synth I've ever had to fully clean it or repair it (if was a bargain buy).
Polysix
Famous death by leaky battery, though if you catch it early or buy one already fixed they are pretty rock solid.

Key contacts notoriously die/need cleaning/silver painting.

The button caps often lose due to the thin plastic arms used on the underlying tact switch cover.

End cheeks prone to damage because they are cheap/thin fake wood.

Rear logo prone to scratching from the plug storage.

For an VCO from 1981, battery aside, I find them very reliable. Always in tune if calibrated.
JD-800
Self editing sliders (dust in the sliders or noisy sliders needing a squirt of juice or replacement). Before buying a JD I was a bit wary of this problem and I do have it occasionally on mine but it's really a NON issue for me. If you notice it's changed (the two dots show up in the LED screen) just rehit the patch button. It happens rarely on mine and if you give the sliders a good up n down now and then and vary their sitting positions (don't leave sliders sat in one place esp at the top or bottom - can cause trouble over years) they seem pretty reliable. A bit of noise is better than a load of dead sliders and Roland put in a wonderful slider cover system that offsets the slider knob from the actual slider (which is off to the right) using an 'reach over' arm. This is what allows the full dust cover on top (aside from the thin slow on the right upright side.

Aftertouch: Like a lot of Rolands the AT sensor that runs under the keys oxidises or weakens over time, while on the JX-8P (see below) you can dismantle it and clean it and make it work wonderfully (I did) the way to do it on the JD-800 is the resistor mod. Basically boosts the signal (or reduces it) and allows it to work. Not done mine yet.

The 7 buttons (exit, up, down, yes, no, left, right) die - normal easy to replace tact switches. THe other buttons on the JD-800 ALL have groovy rubber covers like key contacts which protect them from dust. A rare sign of Roland thinking ahead! (same with the slider design)

Red epoxy of death: Very well known (also affects D-70 and a few others of that era, not D-50). Epoxy runs/melts sloooowly over time esp in hot weather and then dumps on the thin membrane style key contact surface below causing a headache. Weights can fall out and keys can end up stuck together in clumps. Thankfully mine was perfect when I go it and I did the caustic soda soak to remove that old devil's brew (while leaving the weights in)

End caps are a bit brittle being plastic, especially the lower black ones but overall a solid built mostly metal synth. Beautiful machine! :mrgreen: These synths are definitely worth a few days work getting them like new :)
Juno 2/1
Simple so fairly reliable synth. Usually the screen fades on these by now. Requiring a new backlight, or an funky new LED screen (I fitted the latter to mine - white on blue like my SY77). Very nice! suits the great sound now :)

The button cover plastic (not membrane buttons, real good quality tact switches under those covers) can get nicks, scratches, wear through or tears if mistreated - though pretty hardy, it's more about careless owners than the synth.

Pitch benders often snapped off on both Juno 1s and 2s (have had 4 Alpha Junos 2 had snapped sticks and dead gate array chips) 2 were perfect.

Juno 1 only: Plastic tabs that hold the one piece casing tight at the back (where the screws go) snap off from owners over tightening them back up, or through dropping. Casing prone to scratches as ALL plastic (Juno 2 has the middle bit metal only the end cheeks plastic)
SY77
As on TG77 and many synths, the backlights die. They were never that bright to start with so a good excuse to fit a white on blue LED screen (as I did) :)

Floppy drive dies (usually the belt). Rather than fussing around fixing a 20 year old drive, do the drive ribbon cable mod and fit a modern beltless drive for £5 (often cheaper than the belt alone!) you can buy any generic pc floppy - black sony is what I have - slots straight in
JX-3P
Pretty reliable but the buttons are one of the usual first things to go, requiring a few wiggles or often re triggering, due to their longer internal stalks no doubt. Sometime the LEDs can die but not seen that on mine (yet).

Music stand rest bar (the black strip) can easily be snapped off (by idiots)

Tuning pot mounted at rear can get dodgy - needs spraying or replacement to hold it in tune

Usual Roland key contacts/rubbers need cleaning or get intermittent/dead notes
SH-101
where to start??? Common one the power switch goes weak which can affect tunning, just by tapping it. Sometimes just by looking at it. This can also affect other things like LFO speed IIRC. If you have a buggy SH-101 first suspect is the power switch. You can buy replacements online easily enough.

Sliders. On a synth that old that has been around and looked like a toy before it got cool - it's had a lot of stuff thrown at it and the sliders tend to fail. Intermittent, not full range, noisy audio or plain dead. Unless it's been very well looked after AND used regularly you can count on a slider or two dying (my two both had them which i replaced/fixed)

Battery compartment leaks (always ask for photos!)

Discolouring (red ones go pink, grey ones go brown or khaki) this is from UV etc.

Broken screw posts inside. Lots of SH-101s have had screw drivers taken to them for the above, many owners aren't aware that plastic screw posts shouldn't be done up at Hercules strength. If they are, say goodbye to half your post and hello to an SH-101 with some screws missing underneath.
D-50
Usual Roland key contacts/rubbers need cleaning or get intermittent/dead notes or weird/non velocity response.

Aftertouch can be very weak, check the AT slider first then assume the usual Roland flaw. All my D-50s have been good though - as are the Alpha Juno 2s I had with the same system :)

Buttons die easily. Due to the design it's a very short throw between pressed/not pressed. Looks sexy with those low profile buttons but many owners press too hard on them. ALSO dust gets in too easily (not like the JD-800s rubber covered tact switches - other than the 7 clicky normal ones that do go). Easy enough to replace other than the D-50 is horrible to dismantle versus most synths. Everything has to come out to get at them pretty much.

Dynascan board memory chip. By no means a common fault but I've seen a few reports. The memory chip sits on the board fixed to the underside of the keybed, the keybed scanning logic. Expect weird key behaviour if this is acting up - verify with sellers that all notes are working properly!
MKS-50
Dead/dodgy front buttons from all that pressing!!

Occasionally a VCF will go out of whack resulting in one voice sounding more open filter - just recalibrate it from the trimmers inside. Easy
JX-8P
Aftertouch dies (see above)

Notes sticking on. This is due to oxidisation on the metal key contacts, not registering a key up event. Can affect velocity also. I think some JX-8Ps changed to the rubber cup method later on which has it's own problems. I prefer the metal contacts (like yamaha) for overall reliability but Roland used some lesser metal than Yamaha evidently.

Screen burns out (not good)

End caps get scratched/scored/cracked far too easily

Reported failures of power supplies causing lock ups and crashes on the 'tuning' countdown

Tact switches can fail
AX-80
Most common fault on this is the last bank of switches dying. The connections inside (hard metal pins that join the panel boards) get cracks in them. Pretty easy to fix just resolder some flexible cable/wire in place and it will work again.

Voltage selector falls out of the bottom! (only on some markets). This will require some thinking and bridging of the correct wires for your country's voltage!
AN1x
Some revisions (earlier ones I think - mine was ok) are prone to pops/clicks when morphing between 2 scenes.

Knobs are weak and often snap off/go missing

Aftertouch can be too touchy (you can dial it down inside easily enough)

Case isn't very hard wearing, picks up scuffs and cracks on corners easily

Legends wear off where sweaty hands sit tweaking for hours
DX7II and DX7s
Pretty much bullet proof from what I've seen. Even the buttons are much better than the Mk1 but can get dust or go dead like any synth. generally OK. Have had 4 of these and they all worked fine. LCDs don't seem to ever burn out on these? well they certainly don't seem a weak point like other synths and are very bright all these years later.
DX-100
Battery leaks!! Leave batteries in 1988, get out of attic in 2008 and discover a load of acid powder all over your DX-100s rear. One good thing is the green acid at least matches the funky/cool 80s colour scheme - green accents - of the DX-100 :)

Dead keys. the DX-100 has a pretty poor/flimsy keybed with a different type of 'contact sensor' that can get a bit flaky if misused.

Overall fairly robust. even the plastic is hard wearing (better than some 'full size/pro' synths!) Buttons seem to last well too.
DW-8000
Plastic build means very prone to marks, burns, cracks but not if treated fairly well. It's not brittle plastic but does scuff if mistreated. Buttons fail often on these causing multi presses in one press - annoying. Can be sorted the usual way.
M1
Main fault with this is the buttons (as someone already mentioned) they often break off their 'spindle' of 4 or 2 bunches and sit loose in the housing rattling around.

Hey you think it's bad reading all this? how do you think I felt typing it! :lol:

User avatar
Nannerfan
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 282
Joined: Thu Feb 17, 2011 10:00 pm
Gear: Akai AX-60, AX-80, S612
Arturia Microbrute
Roland D-550, TR-8
Yamaha QY700, SU700, TX81Z

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Nannerfan » Wed Nov 28, 2012 8:27 am

Akai AX-80 is one of the only synths that had problems.. but I bought it off a guy in an industrial band that used it as a MIDI controller. The knob always drifted.. so I just taped some Atari game tokens on it for weight.. works great.

Of course the far right membranes were not working.. re-soldered them and it fixed it.. but somehow f**k up some of the display.. but as long as I can read the envelopes I'm gravy.

Also had some weird power issue.. if you punched it .. it worked.
This reason I eventually sent it in and got that fixed.

After that I got an odd voice issue.. where the 4th note always had a strange distortion.
I was about to replace a chip for it (made a thread here about it).. but then the problem just vanished.

I think board inside is ungrounded or something.. because it's really sensitive and specific to what pressure you put on the front panel.

I should really post a pic of this thing, you'd laugh how messed up it is... but I love it.
Probably my favorite synth.

User avatar
Bitexion
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 4230
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2005 7:43 pm
Gear: Alesis Andromeda A6
Roland D-50
Creamware Minimax
Yamaha DX7s
Analogue Systems modular
Ensoniq SQ-80
Waldorf Blofeld
Location: Drammen, Norway

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Bitexion » Wed Nov 28, 2012 8:30 am

Also had some weird power issue.. if you punched it .. it worked.
This reason I eventually sent it in and got that fixed
Violence usually solves everything

User avatar
Alex E
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2235
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:07 am
Gear: Jupiter-6, DX7, TX7, Juno-106, AX60, Pro One, S1000, M1r, Live 9, iMac MC309XX/A
Location: Anaheim, CA

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Alex E » Wed Nov 28, 2012 8:48 am

rhino wrote:YMMV. My Ensoniq SQ80 was bought in 1987 from the original owner. Has had two batteries and the OS upgrade to 1.8
1987? Very cool. Maybe it's an early unit... What's the build date?
soundcloud.com/vectron


User avatar
Dr. Phibes
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 525
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 5:12 am
Location: UK

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Dr. Phibes » Wed Nov 28, 2012 9:02 am

Bitexion wrote:
Also had some weird power issue.. if you punched it .. it worked.
This reason I eventually sent it in and got that fixed
Violence usually solves everything
Careful now - you don't want to end up like one of those far right membranes.

User avatar
Stab Frenzy
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9723
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:41 pm
Gear: Eurorack, RYTM, Ultranova, many FX
Location: monster island*
Contact:

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by Stab Frenzy » Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:35 am

Dr. Phibes wrote:
Bitexion wrote:
Also had some weird power issue.. if you punched it .. it worked.
This reason I eventually sent it in and got that fixed
Violence usually solves everything
Careful now - you don't want to end up like one of those far right membranes.
:lol:

User avatar
musden
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:34 am
Real name: den
Gear: radikal technologies accelerator
Band: aipracs

Re: Reliability of synthesizers

Post by musden » Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:43 am

Yes, Pro5 it was inpressive post. That is your JD on you picture, I suppose?

Post Reply