I Dream of Wires

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Stab Frenzy
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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by Stab Frenzy » Tue Sep 10, 2013 2:44 pm

Back to the topic of IDOW please gents.

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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by CZ Rider » Fri Sep 27, 2013 7:11 am

Ordered the IDOW last week and it showed up today.
That was quick!
Image
Just watched the first part. Enough Moog and Buchla to make anyone happy.
I enjoyed watching it, almost two hours. Part two some time soon.

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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by plikestechno » Tue Oct 01, 2013 7:35 am

I was glad to buy an early copy and support the film as I'm glad the current resurgence of modulars and analog is being documented. I'm also glad that they were able to turn around some more copies for people that wanted one quickly and help support their endeavour and maybe turn a remote bit of profit.

Because I don't think the film has a future anywhere else. It's doesn't really have a future in major festivals or being purchased as a documentary because I can't imagine a story that could be less compelling than the one told here. The whole second part is boys showing off their toys and nothing that anyone outside of the modular community will give a c**p about. And it's not completely the film's fault. People looking to fill doc festivals are looking for the next "Saving Sugarman" or people who overcome really crappy odds or don't and end up getting their dreams crushed. They don't want to educate, they want hollywood stories except with real people playing the roles.

It's educational television and to give it a future should be marketed to national television broadcasters, international educational and learning channels and learning institutions. Contact each national and educational channel in the world and take whatever they will give you to broadcast it for either one year or indefinitely.

It's like watching a TLC show on how to make donuts or school buses and you go, "Oh, neat." And you forget about everything but the facts and you sure as h**l wouldn't watch it again. Cut each part down to 47 minutes to fit in an hour slot and have the channels air them back to back. The old then the new.

As a person who has been around documentaries and learning television my whole adult life the only thing I found interesting is seeing what people around the the modular and synthesizer community looked like, sounded like and their thoughts on the resurgence. But it still bored me to tears for the most part and was a very laborious 4 hours. Facts and anecdotes are all that remained and the story sticks a bit because it was simply so awful.

Technically it's fantastic other than overusing flash transitions. It is much better than most documentaries and educational television as far as production goes. Narration is well done but it would have been nice to have a more energetic voice in the newer half of the doc.

The smartest thing is that they sold it directly to modular and synth nerds right off the bat. A voice dying to have their obsession be heard and understood with plenty of disposable cash around. Funding the film without any government support and not tying it to the demands of a funding broadcaster so they had the freedom to do the film they wanted is the greatest achievement of this whole thing. I've seen so many people s**t away their life savings and their life's energy on movies and docs that NO ONE wanted to watch, so many independent producers take boatloads of broadcaster and government money for a film and then throw together some cheap, quick doc on environmental, nature or social issues in a week or two while pocketing most of the grants. There was an audience for this film but it might be the only interested audience for it.

I just wished it was more compelling. I won't even bother to watch the theatrical cut. I know what I'd leave in and what would get cut out and I'm sure my vision of a shorter cut doesn't match what they would keep so it's pointless bothering to watch something that will be more boring or frustrating than enjoyable.
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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by Stab Frenzy » Wed Oct 02, 2013 3:26 am

CZ Rider wrote:Ordered the IDOW last week and it showed up today.
That was quick!
Ha, I ordered in March and it didn't arrive until a week ago. By the time it finally turned up I was so over the whole thing that I haven't even bothered to watch it completely. The fact that the international orders were shipped via the cheapest possible option despite the fact it was twice the price a normal DVD would be, that when the cheap shipper lost a good amount of the orders the replacements weren't even sent straight away (mine was 10 days from saying a replacement would be sent to when it actually shipped) and then the fact that the 'limited edition that was never going to be rereleased' was already repressed and being sold before I got my copy I'd paid for six months previously pissed me off a fair bit. I trusted what was said about it being the only opportunity to get it early on, as did many others who provided the cash upfront that paid for the production of the movie. For them to go back on their word before they'd even got all the initial orders out feels like a slap in the face.

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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by analoglsd » Thu Oct 03, 2013 9:22 pm

Automatic Gainsay wrote:
It is often stated that Scott was an influence on Moog. And, he was. Scott invited Moog over early in Moog's career.
He then took Bob's theremin design and integrated it with his Clavivox. And that is cool.

What is apparently not known is that Scott, from that point on, consistently commissioned designs from Bob any time he needed something he couldn't do. Bob was to keep these things secret, as Scott was VERY protective of his ideas. But Scott literally depended on Moog's ingenuity for Scott's designs.

This can be proven soon. You'll be able to go to Cornell and review Bob's notebooks and see this for yourself.

Thanks for the info! I had no idea of the depth of their relationship. Pretty amazing.
No plans on going to Cornell any time soon, if ever, but I would love for someone to publish an article about this.
BTW: has anyone seen the DVD documentary about Raymond Scott's life? I believe one of his kids produced it.

(sorry for the slight de-rail)

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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by meatballfulton » Fri Jan 24, 2014 9:41 pm

The DVD was reviewed by Tape Op magazine here.

I loved this comment:
My beef is this: Everyone in the film talks about the unlimited sonic possibilities of modular analog synths, but most of the music sounds the same. Why is there so little innovation or musicality in this potentially unlimited music?
I think the answer is simple: composition. It's one thing to have the instrument, it's another to be able to compose for it.
I listened to Hatfield and the North at Rainbow. They were very wonderful and they made my heart a prisoner.

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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by syntheticsolutions » Fri Jan 24, 2014 10:00 pm

meatballfulton wrote:The DVD was reviewed by Tape Op magazine here.

I loved this comment:
My beef is this: Everyone in the film talks about the unlimited sonic possibilities of modular analog synths, but most of the music sounds the same. Why is there so little innovation or musicality in this potentially unlimited music?
I think the answer is simple: composition. It's one thing to have the instrument, it's another to be able to compose for it.
Couldn't agree more! I would say 95% of eurorack demonstrations i have seen have produced nothing more that glitchy, bleeps or SFX type sounds. That in itself is all well and good but i find it a bit premature for a machine that can cost in excess of ££££. I think the modular subculture as it is referred to in this article has a lot of wealthy enthusiasts involved and very few musicians and composers.

I do however feel that this will soon change as a result of the ever growing popularity of the modular synth once more.
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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by Re-Member » Fri Jan 24, 2014 10:14 pm

analoglsd wrote:BTW: has anyone seen the DVD documentary about Raymond Scott's life? I believe one of his kids produced it.
I actually saw a screening of it and got to meet Stan Warnow. I asked him about future Raymond Scott compilations showingcasing music he did in the 70's and 80's since the documentary mentions he continued to produce electronic music throughout the rest of his life, but unfortunately, Stan's response seemed completely dismissive of the idea and he said it was "just a bunch of noise." It was almost like I struck a nerve with him. So somewhere out there, there's about three decades worth of Raymond Scott sound experiments just waiting to be heard.

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Re: I Dream of Wires

Post by meatballfulton » Sat Jan 25, 2014 1:24 am

plikestechno wrote:It's educational television and to give it a future should be marketed to national television broadcasters, international educational and learning channels and learning institutions.
It would make a good double feature at the drive-ins this summer paired with The Mellotron Movie :keys1:
I listened to Hatfield and the North at Rainbow. They were very wonderful and they made my heart a prisoner.

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