Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic music

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by Hybrid88 » Wed Mar 06, 2013 1:41 am

tekkentool wrote:
Walter Ego wrote: Turn on a radio. It's everywhere, because acid is everywhere in pop songs now that club music has gone massively mainstream. That's not a small portion of the population. It IS a small portion of the population that actually knows it's a 303 or a 303 knock-off that's making those lines...
I can't think of a pop song in recent memory that used a 303.

Are you sure you aren't thinking of the 90's? -
Allow me to enlighten you then ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyx6JDQCslE

The 303 (or usually software clones) are most definitly still in music, say any different and you're probably not a fan and subconsciously filter it out whenever you hear one :lol:

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by balma » Wed Mar 06, 2013 1:49 am

Yamaha DX7 changed everything.... how much persons in the world have heard its sounds in contemporaneous music since it was released?

And maybe he´s the master of the DX7:
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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by Stab Frenzy » Wed Mar 06, 2013 2:06 am

Basically anything that was cheap, didn't do what it was supposed to do and wasn't wanted by 'serious' musicians ended up contributing to dance music.

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by Bitexion » Wed Mar 06, 2013 2:15 am

Yeah, the TB-303 was made and intended by Roland to be a "bass guitar replacement". Not a squelchy "acid lines" box. That came much later when they had discontinued the thing.

And nowadays, it's plenty easy to mimic the 303 acid line sound on both VA synths with roland clone filters, or Reason's Rebirth (RB-303) synth that is free.

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by Scories » Wed Mar 06, 2013 4:35 am

The Minimoog has probably been the most important synth in rock history.

The VCS3 has probably been the most important synth in 70's electronic music.
The DX-7 has probably been the most important synth in 80's electronic music.
The TB-303 has probably been the most important synth in 90's electronic music.

Now Abbleton Live must be the main reference in post-00's electronic music, for the better and the worse.

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by tekkentool » Wed Mar 06, 2013 5:40 am

Hybrid88 wrote: The 303 (or usually software clones) are most definitly still in music, say any different and you're probably not a fan and subconsciously filter it out whenever you hear one :lol:
I thought of that song but decided to not include it, up in the air to me if it's even a 303 clone or just any synth... "Acid" sounds exist but most people don't use 303's for them.

In modern EDM it's been entirely replaced by notch filtered rubber bass and dutch leads. For better or for worse.

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by Hybrid88 » Wed Mar 06, 2013 6:30 am

tekkentool wrote:
Hybrid88 wrote: The 303 (or usually software clones) are most definitly still in music, say any different and you're probably not a fan and subconsciously filter it out whenever you hear one :lol:
I thought of that song but decided to not include it, up in the air to me if it's even a 303 clone or just any synth... "Acid" sounds exist but most people don't use 303's for them.

In modern EDM it's been entirely replaced by notch filtered rubber bass and dutch leads. For better or for worse.
Well that's the thing, the original 303 is *so* recognisable and limited that you kind of have to use something else and change it a bit or it just sounds like 90's raves all over again.

I for one welcome it, always been a massive fan of notch-filtered bass even before I knew what a 303 was, to me it's like the evolution of the sound that started it all. :)

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by Dr. Phibes » Wed Mar 06, 2013 8:07 am

Whilst it's true that this kind of hobby is ultimately all about 'the goods' I would be wary about reducing this stuff to simply a list of model numbers. Of course, there have hugely iconic and important machines and they've been appropriately mentioned, but the development of new musical styles and artistic movements is just as much about the culture of the times from which they sprang, the way people approached composition and myriad ways technology fed back on these processes. To often I find that 'historical' overviews are really just more about what currently happens to be popular.

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by calaverasgrande » Wed Mar 06, 2013 8:26 am

I think it depends what you call "electronic dance music", and what you call a "synthesizer".
I used to think samplers weren't synthesizers. But after getting over my hangups (fears?). I realized samplers are not just playback devices. Most samplers have various tools for modifying the sounds. As well as many have filters, just like plain old analog synths.

I think it is interesting that a lot of classic electronic music from the 70's and 80's was made using stuff much less glamorous than Minimoogs and Arps.
The Paraphonic synths, string machine from Crumar, Solina and others. The preset synths put out by Moog, Arp etc.
These are all over Kraftwerk, Gary Numan, New Order/Joy Division etc.

Most important? That could mean widely used/emulated.
hence 808/909/303.
Or important for spearheading a design or format, like Minimoog, Arp 2600.
So then you start asking questions like, what was the first synth with a built in pattern sequencer a la TB303?
What was the first programmable drum machine with "songs" and not just patterns?
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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by pflosi » Wed Mar 06, 2013 10:32 am

Bitexion wrote:And nowadays, it's plenty easy to mimic the 303 acid line sound with Reason's Rebirth.
:lol: That was a nice joke dude ;)

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by JJQ » Wed Mar 06, 2013 10:48 am

I think you can hear a lot of Jupiter-6 in old Harthouse & Eye-q records. Frankfurt style :)
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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by Stab Frenzy » Wed Mar 06, 2013 10:54 am

calaverasgrande wrote:I think it depends what you call "electronic dance music", and what you call a "synthesizer".
Don't forget it also depends on what you call "important" and what you call "evolution".

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by tekkentool » Wed Mar 06, 2013 11:50 am

pflosi wrote: :lol: That was a nice joke dude ;)
In all seriousness though I mean d16 phoscyon does a 95% job. Which is 100% as good as most people need the 303 lines in their music to actually sound like.

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by pflosi » Wed Mar 06, 2013 12:07 pm

tekkentool wrote:
pflosi wrote: :lol: That was a nice joke dude ;)
In all seriousness though I mean d16 phoscyon does a 95% job. Which is 100% as good as most people need the 303 lines in their music to actually sound like.
Probably. It's certainly closer than Rebirth. However, there is so much stuff making the original unique so that no clone (soft or hard) really nails it so far - the sequencer (no clone clones that), the accent system with its three different envelopes, the slide that slides at the end of the note instead of the beginning of the next one, the strange waveshaping to get the saw, and so on...

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Re: Most important synthesisers in evolution of electronic m

Post by tekkentool » Wed Mar 06, 2013 12:19 pm

Lucky I don't make music exclusively for the market of "people who own 303's" then.

I don't make music for anyone.

I don't do black music, I don't do white music, I make fight music.

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