Page 1 of 2

s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 6:09 am
by CuBulo
I'm currently trying to release anger from dealing with my broken Juno-106 that i've been trying to get fixed since 2009. For as long as i've been a electronic-music gear collector, i've always been more attracted to the hardware of the 80s and 90s. My problem is that every time I have invested in pre-2000s gear, there has been something wrong with everything, which just leads to stress and thinking more about software and new gear. Has anyone else dealt with having really bad luck with vintage gear?

•as I said, my Juno-106 has had voice problems ever since I bought it.
•my E-MU SP-1200 had a messed up disk drive and sticky buttons.
•my MMT-8 sequencer had a broken LED
•my tascam 8 track tape deck had only 1 working channel
-every piece of post-90s gear had worked fine...

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 6:22 am
by plus321
You might be able to fix some of the problems you have here yourself, but it's a risk to work on expensive stuff when you don't have much experience.

I think being able to do some basic repair work is what really let me get a lot of stuff because I would buy things in the kind of conditions you're talking about at a discount and then fix it and use it, then sell it and get something else. I've also fried a few things. Win some, lose some.

But to answer your question, I don't think I've ever owned an old machine that didn't need something done to it. That's the game, I suppose.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 7:45 am
by oryjen
'should take a Korg Legacy... :?

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 8:14 am
by Hybrid88
It's nothing to do with luck, it's just the way it is for everyone - trust me on that.

Like plus321 I also can't think of a single vintage synth/drum machine I've bought that doesn't need "something" done to it, some more than others but I mean they're old and fragile what do you expect?

To be honest I can totally sympathise cause it is a major PITA, but well... that's what we have modern analog for, can't say there's not enough choice with that.

Simply put, going vintage is a choice. There are numerous other alternatives for getting the job done. Personally I made it because of sound, or more specifically "tone", *definitely* not upkeep, cost or workflow simplicity. Just my 2¢.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:27 am
by synthparts
On the Juno-106 once you replace or refurbish the 80017A voice chips it should be rock solid...

Honestly a lot of the old vintage stuff was made to last not like the cheap c**p made in China today. I've had more probs with newer stuff (Blofeld, Q, DSI stuff, Juno-D, Nords, etc) than a lot of my vintage 70s/80s synths. The other thing is at least you CAN work on the old stuff. Newer stuff is all tiny surface mount parts and the typical fix is a complete board swap. Good luck fixing that stuff in 10-20-30 years...

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 2:19 pm
by Stab Frenzy
Yeah that's not bad luck, that's just old synths needing maintenance. If you don't want to put in the time and effort to maintain them then you're better off using new synths.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 2:39 pm
by ppg_wavecomputer
You have never owned a PPG -- or a CS80, for that matter.

Stephen

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 2:50 pm
by bhrama
"Pay to play" has been my personal experience with vintage gear.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 3:28 pm
by rhino
Like classic cars - maintenence and upkeep is a given.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 3:44 pm
by fh991586
I must be pretty lucky, because I only got one real problem so far that I could not fix myself in all my gear [for lack of soldering knowledge]... But when it will start, I'll be sorry! :?

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:24 pm
by vin14
As has been mentioned before, if you use vintage gear be prepared for the odd service / repair bill. I had the Juno 106 issue, but it's been 100% since. My alpha juno's blue lcd backlight has died, but I can live with that. Likewise with the sticky buttons on my D50 and SY-85 (which has got serious use over the years), there's also the odd crackly pot on some of my older gear too. It's just the way it is and I think I've been pretty lucky.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:35 pm
by redchapterjubilee
I've had s**t luck owning most synthesizers, new/used/vintage or otherwise. I had to send back a Little Phatty to Asheville twice for warranty repair. DSI's encoders are shite. I had to send back my Vermona Mono Lancet to Germany for warranty repair. Not to mention the issues I've had with vintage synths I've owned. Synthesizers are perhaps not the most rock solid of instruments.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:44 pm
by Stafftunes
The osc 2 PW waveform switch on my JP6 has never worked (I've had to start with a patch with it 'on' if I want to use PW on osc 2)

Aside from that no issues

- but in terms of new kit :

the encoders on the Blofeld tend to play up, I've fixed this using Stromeko Diy's encoder fix (soldering capacitors to the backs of the encoders). The encoders on my Yamaha A4000 have always been a nightmare, they're meant to be self-cleaning, you turn them 50 times one way then the other, and then they might be ok.... but generaly since brand new they've not worked quite right.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 5:18 pm
by Sir Ruff
to the OP, It sounds like everything you bought already had issues before you bought it. So that's not really bad luck, just bad background checking. The problems you mentioned for the 1200 and 106 are pretty common for those units.

Re: s**t Luck With Vintage Gear

Posted: Wed Jun 26, 2013 5:30 pm
by natrixgli
The great thing is that new gear is really livening up these days. I used to love vintage gear but now I won't touch the stuff. It's overpriced and risky. The only way I would ever acquire any old gear is if I stumbled upon a "too good to be true" type of deal, like someone tossed a Minimoog in the trash or something.

Otherwise I love the stuff that's coming out these days. Tons of really inspiring and great sounding gear.