David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by Sir Nose » Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:55 pm

Lots of folks taking vintage setups on the road. I end up seeing a B3 and minimoog somewhere almost every year on stage. Some years when I got to more shows, multiple times in a year.

Usually musicians who love the tools that they know and won't sacrifice tone.

Robert Walter
John Medeski
Bernie Worrell
Kofi Burbridge (Derek Truck's Band)

All change some of the instruments in their setup from time to time, but always are on tour with their B3.
Funkadelic wrote: nothing is good unless you play with it
all that is good is nasty

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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by ppg_wavecomputer » Thu Jul 18, 2013 3:50 pm

Sir Nose wrote:Lots of folks taking vintage setups on the road. I end up seeing a B3 and minimoog somewhere almost every year on stage. Some years when I got to more shows, multiple times in a year.

Usually musicians who love the tools that they know and won't sacrifice tone.

Robert Walter
John Medeski
Bernie Worrell
Kofi Burbridge (Derek Truck's Band)

All change some of the instruments in their setup from time to time, but always are on tour with their B3.
From a practical point of view, Sancious is of course right. If you have to deliver a proper show you can´t rely on instruments which are delicate. In that respect a Kronos must seem like a Godsend. Hey, even a Hammond XB-3 run through some Leslie-type speaker can do the trick on stage. But in the studio nothing beats the real thing.

I´m not too keen on taking the old stuff on stage anymore, either.

Stephen
"Like the light from distant stars, Stephen Parsick's music has existed for some time, but is only now reaching us on Earth." Chuck van Zyl

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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by Cumulus » Thu Jul 18, 2013 8:37 pm

Hybrid88 wrote: Going by that logic Justin Beiber is the better source of wisdom on music than any of us because he earns his money that way... See the irony? :lol:
If Justin abieber is talking about passing in restaurant kitchens then perhaps he has some expertise.

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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by madtheory » Fri Jul 19, 2013 5:12 pm

OK for So he would need:
Fairlight CMI 3
Fairlight CMI IIx
(On the original tour they used an S900)
Yamaha CS80
Prophet 5 (maybe 2 for the layered sounds)
Yamaha CP70
Yamaha TX rack
Hammond B3
Grand Piano
NED Synclavier
Linn drum
Eventide H3000
AMS RMX16
AMS DMX 15-80
Yamaha SPX90
Roland Dimension D
The phaser they used on that record (I can't remember it right now).
A MIDI controller to do the patch changes for that lot- would probably need a computer to run it, let's say Mac SE30 and Opcode interfaces.
A piano tuner for the two pianos.
An electronics technician plus spares to keep it all going.
One articulated truck.

Screw that. Use a Kronos.

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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by Yoozer » Fri Jul 19, 2013 8:11 pm

FYI David Sancious kicks the everliving snot out of 99,9% of the keyboard players. The Minimoog and Polymoog work on tracks like and is astounding. Pretty much the entire discography is on Youtube (good thing his last name is distinctive) - the re-releases are hampered by some foolish rightsholders who for some reason don't want to make any money -and- don't want to let more people know of the music.

This is not "just a backing band guy" the albums he made are ridiculously underappreciated gems of stellar musicianship.
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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by jimtheswede » Fri Jul 19, 2013 8:47 pm

Yoozer wrote:FYI David Sancious kicks the everliving snot out of 99,9% of the keyboard players. The Minimoog and Polymoog work on tracks like and is astounding. Pretty much the entire discography is on Youtube (good thing his last name is distinctive) - the re-releases are hampered by some foolish rightsholders who for some reason don't want to make any money -and- don't want to let more people know of the music.

This is not "just a backing band guy" the albums he made are ridiculously underappreciated gems of stellar musicianship.
Fully agree! I have his first 2 Tone albums. Check out the minimoog solo starting around 2:50 on this one. Pretty sure he knows what he wants as a backing artist on tour. The guy is incredible - and on guitar as well.


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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by LWG » Mon Aug 05, 2013 6:55 am

jimtheswede wrote:
Yoozer wrote:FYI David Sancious kicks the everliving snot out of 99,9% of the keyboard players. The Minimoog and Polymoog work on tracks like and is astounding. Pretty much the entire discography is on Youtube (good thing his last name is distinctive) - the re-releases are hampered by some foolish rightsholders who for some reason don't want to make any money -and- don't want to let more people know of the music.

This is not "just a backing band guy" the albums he made are ridiculously underappreciated gems of stellar musicianship.
Fully agree! I have his first 2 Tone albums. Check out the minimoog solo starting around 2:50 on this one. Pretty sure he knows what he wants as a backing artist on tour. The guy is incredible - and on guitar as well.


Hello,

"Transformation" lp was my intro to David Sancious music back then. Have all of his vinyl since.
His keyboard and guitar work are on the releases of other fusion players from that era; Stanley Clarke's,
'School Days", etc.
Link to bassist, Gerald Carboy's site with clips and pics of David Sancious and Tone:

http://www.geraldcarboy.com/DS&Tone.html


Regards,

-L

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Re: David Sancious's comment on vintage gear (keyboard mag)

Post by nvbrkr » Mon Aug 05, 2013 3:58 pm

ppg_wavecomputer wrote:
griffin avid wrote: and I´m sure Sancious is more into that type of thing anyway, being tied to the limitations of the genre he works within.

I hope you mean the 'limitations of all genres', including the one you like to make.

[...]
"Limitations force you to be creative." (Brian Eno)

Of course, everything is limited more or less by the skills or the imagination of the respective performer.

I was thinking of the musical genres Sancious works within -- in terms of styles, Rock´n´Roll, R´n´B, Jazz, Fusion, Funk is a wide scope indeed but rather undemanding for synthesiser players. Even though many of his colleagues had piles of keyboards (think Zawinul or Corea or Hammer or Hancock), their use was always limited to novelty sound effects, backdrop sounds, or imitations of traditional instruments. This doesn´t necessarily require "vintage" synthesisers -- bread-and-butter machines will do quite as well.

Stephen
I'm not 100% sure what you intended to say with that comment about the 1970/80s players like Zawinul and Hancock, but the claim that they used synths only for "novelty sound effects, backdrop sounds, or imitations of traditional instruments" is incorrect. They used synths and other keyboard instruments with effects for just as varied purposes as anyone else I can think of.

Many feel that it's exactly the rather simplistic synth lead and bass sounds that analog synths excel at. In funk and jazz fusion the analog synth leads and basses really offer a big advantage over the digital emulations. In the end they're just livelier and warmer sounding. The fans of this type of music have complained a lot about the sterility of the later output by the artists you've mentioned - and, yes, it has everything to do with the choice of sounds and not the lack of talent.

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