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Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 1:41 pm
by Nils
Steve Jones wrote:I have the two oscillator Micromoog (the Multimoog), perfect condition, looks the same as the Micromoog but longer. It sounds fantastic, using the aftertouch to control sync between the two VCO's is out of this world. But I bet I would be lucky to get $600.00 for it if I tried to sell it.
Multimoogs on ebay right now are between 2250USD and 2600USD. Whether they sell for that or not is a different story..

I used to have a Multimoog and loved it. Punchy, strong sound, perfect for percussive bass lines.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 6:33 pm
by WhinyLittleRunt
seamonkey wrote:I think your first mistake was thinking Guitar Center was going to give you anything for the micromoog.
Trade in value at Guitar Center is pennies on a dollar.

A quick glance at recent ebay auctions of sold micromoogs show them going from $700 and up.
Anything Moog, escpecially vintage will have a market.
It might be worth joining ebay, if you're not already a member.
Well, I went in with that and a mint DX-7 hoping to get the trade value up close enough to the 1k mark so I could pitch a few extra and get the Prodigy, and I was being lazy about it and wanted the easy way out, but I know better than to let something like that go for nothing. And on top of that, they didn't even open the case to the DX-7 which had all the stuff with it and was practically new, and just said 'yeah we've had 4 of these this year already'. So, I just took them and left. Kind of bummed, but hey, if it wasn't meant to be it wasn't meant to be...

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 7:03 pm
by WhinyLittleRunt
Clearly the value of a Prodigy is based on its popularity anyway... I hate that the cheapies aren't even cheap anymore. What I still do like very much about the Micromoog is that it does do a deep, rounded bass that cuts in the mix and sounds good. That's pretty much what I use it for. And it probably all depends on musical style, too. I think it definitely has function over sound though, and that could be just as important depending on what it is being used for. I do remember interfacing it with some Foogers I borrowed several years back and that was fun.
Aaron2 wrote:I would probably use it only for basses anyway, and a used, $400 Minitaur can run circles around the Micro. If you're feeling the need for a budget Moog, the Minitaur is the way to go, IMO.
I dunno... I played around with one for a week and wasn't that into it. I'm not sure what it was but it was the same feeling I got when I bought a LP in '07 and ditched it within months because it just didn't do it for me. In fact, I ditched the LP and kept the Micromoog because I felt there was still something about it tone-wise that it had that the LP lacked. But I know it's not just me because I've heard plenty of accounts now where people just didn't bond with the LP...

I think my best bet to get over this is to take the Micromoog and hook it up in a different room, separate from my other stuff, and just mess with it for a few hours to start liking it again. And it's probably not worth ditching it for several hundred bucks.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 11:48 pm
by Ashe37
Steve Jones wrote:I have the two oscillator Micromoog (the Multimoog), perfect condition, looks the same as the Micromoog but longer. It sounds fantastic, using the aftertouch to control sync between the two VCO's is out of this world. But I bet I would be lucky to get $600.00 for it if I tried to sell it.
I'll give you $601

:P

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 11:58 pm
by Steve Jones
I was waiting for that post. I knew someone would do it ;)

Who knows why the Micro and Multi just don't command much on the market. They are relatively poorly constructed but better than the Prodigy, Rogue etc and they certainly look more retro and are more "Moogy" than those two.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:20 am
by Automatic Gainsay
The Micromoog is one of the best Moog synthesizers ever made.

It was created by Bob Moog and Jim Scott... and the fact that it "only has one oscillator" is utterly irrelevant. You don't need multiple oscillators to do anything beyond having intervals.

The Micromoog has CONTINUOUSLY VARIABLE WAVESHAPE that is also MODULATABLE. That means it can create unique and interesting waveshapes that change over time. With that alone, it is MILES beyond most of the analog synths of the 70s. In addition to this, you can also modulate the filter with the oscillator... which is one of the tricks used in the Minimoog to create a beautiful and "fat" saturated sound.

The Micromoog has functionality the Minimoog lacks.

While the envelopes are extremely simple, the sounds people usually play on vintage synthesizers such as this are equally simple. If you need complex envelopes, you probably aren't happy with vintage analog anyway.

There is an incredible diversity of synthesis possible with the Micromoog that is impossible with synthesizers such as the Prodigy and the Rogue. It is TRULY underrated.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:22 am
by Automatic Gainsay
You know, I don't wan't to be a d**k, but statements like "the Minitaur can run circles around the Micro" are based in such massive and contemptible ignorance that is infuriates me.

I made the damned demo video for the Minitaur for Moog, and I loved it's nice big rich sound... but it is a DESPERATELY limited synthesizer, and does not approach the functionality OR the sound of the Micromoog. On top of that, it's buggy as h**l, and it doesn't even have a power switch. Come on, people.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 5:33 am
by WhinyLittleRunt
Automatic Gainsay wrote:it doesn't even have a power switch. Come on, people.
Seriously... I remember that being one of the eyerolls I gave it within the first 5 minutes of playing with it.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 7:45 am
by Nils
Automatic Gainsay wrote: You don't need multiple oscillators to do anything beyond having intervals.
Are you joking? How about FM, sync and ring mod?

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:29 am
by Bitexion
Most cheap monosynths didn't have any of those features even with two oscillators. No ringmod or sync on the minimoog either. Yamaha CS15, two VCOs, no sync or ringmod.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 1:41 pm
by Nils
Bitexion wrote:Most cheap monosynths didn't have any of those features even with two oscillators. No ringmod or sync on the minimoog either. Yamaha CS15, two VCOs, no sync or ringmod.
True, but the original statement wasn't limited to that... I'm not saying it's a prerequisite for a good synth - I can think of several cool synths with one VCO. Just that there are multiple uses to two+ VCOs outside intervals, regardless of instrument price or general complexity. Take the Odyssey for example...

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:49 pm
by Bitexion
The most amazing oscillator I've ever seen is on the Arturia Minibrute. Also by far the biggest oscillator. It has just 1 VCO, but the waveforms can be mangled in various modulations within the VCO. The sawtooth can be turned into a double saw w/ adjustable "chorusing", the square has PWM, the triangle has "metalizer" which is some kind of wave wrapping that turns it into something completely nasty and different. And all waveforms+noise are freely mixable before the output. Crazy stuff with just one oscillator there.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 5:56 pm
by c-level
Bitexion wrote:The most amazing oscillator I've ever seen is on the Arturia Minibrute. Also by far the biggest oscillator. It has just 1 VCO, but the waveforms can be mangled in various modulations within the VCO. The sawtooth can be turned into a double saw w/ adjustable "chorusing", the square has PWM, the triangle has "metalizer" which is some kind of wave wrapping that turns it into something completely nasty and different. And all waveforms+noise are freely mixable before the output. Crazy stuff with just one oscillator there.
and they all distort to high h**l if you pull the faders up above half way. there is seriously something offputting to me about that synth. i know synths are supposed to be blank slates and not tied into genre but the 'brutes seem to be a direct response to the dubstep and electro-house 'womp' craze of last year... like i need a 'i survived the pop-dubstep invasion of 2014 and all i got was this lousy minibrute' tshirt.

but back to the micro moog, whats the next 'affordable' synth you can buy that has 'filter mod by osc' parameter? like, a pro one or oddysey? and thats not even very affordable....

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:39 pm
by HideawayStudio
Automatic Gainsay wrote:The Micromoog is one of the best Moog synthesizers ever made.

It was created by Bob Moog and Jim Scott... and the fact that it "only has one oscillator" is utterly irrelevant. You don't need multiple oscillators to do anything beyond having intervals.

The Micromoog has CONTINUOUSLY VARIABLE WAVESHAPE that is also MODULATABLE. That means it can create unique and interesting waveshapes that change over time. With that alone, it is MILES beyond most of the analog synths of the 70s. In addition to this, you can also modulate the filter with the oscillator... which is one of the tricks used in the Minimoog to create a beautiful and "fat" saturated sound.

The Micromoog has functionality the Minimoog lacks.

While the envelopes are extremely simple, the sounds people usually play on vintage synthesizers such as this are equally simple. If you need complex envelopes, you probably aren't happy with vintage analog anyway.

There is an incredible diversity of synthesis possible with the Micromoog that is impossible with synthesizers such as the Prodigy and the Rogue. It is TRULY underrated.
I have to concur with Marc... I worked on one last year and loved it. The Micromoog is actually quite a special little monosynth and yes, the thing that really makes the difference is the modulatable continuously morphing oscillator shape coupled with the wave doubling feature makes for lots of complex harmonic movement.

Sometimes I think rather too much emphasis is put on filters in analogs - you can have the nicest filters in the world but if the very waveforms that are being filtered are uninteresting and static then its never going to sound great. Fortunately this synth has an interesting oscillator for sure!

If there was any one thing I had to criticise its the rather nasty vacuum molded top casing which has a nasty habit of sagging with age and eventually resting on top of the key levers which results on a loud clack on every rebound.

Re: Do people really not like the Micromoog?

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 7:24 pm
by sam
I also like the minibrute....don't make modern music either..

Always amazes me every time I play it....wonderful plus the micro.