Your lifelong equipment list

Discussions about anything analog, digital, MIDI, synth technology, techniques, theories and more.
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griffin avid
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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by griffin avid » Fri Nov 11, 2016 7:52 pm

I actually expect there to be a Tempest in that set up eventually. :D
That's a nice set up. I've been dreaming of a "U" shaped work space for years.

What's the DAW that everything runs in or on to?
I find the studio ergonomics impossible to sort out.
I just can't reach everything as easily as possible so I play the closest and keep rotating those pieces like a starting line-up for a team.

And like Antilles, above a bunch of us have lots of Roland pieces.

And...and Zamise sold his Spectralis :shock: :shock: .
It's one of my favorite pieces, but funny that I NEVER use for what I bought it for.
MASTER DRUM GROOVEBOX. Lol. I must have made 3 tracks on there before it was slotted firmly as total tone module.
I love every category of sound it makes.

But back to you, you have a few pieces that are in that 'dream someday category' but it seems raw tone doesn't always increase in love as you climb the expense ladder.
I went from DSI MoPho to Tetra and then back to MoPho. There's about that little yellow box that does it.
Same thing from KORG microKORG to the silver XL and back to the original. Even though the XL did all the sounds of the microKORG bit for bit- something wasn't quite the same.
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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by MOS-FET » Fri Nov 11, 2016 8:19 pm

griffin avid wrote:I actually expect there to be a Tempest in that set up eventually. :D
That's a nice set up. I've been dreaming of a "U" shaped work space for years.

What's the DAW that everything runs in or on to?
I find the studio ergonomics impossible to sort out.
I just can't reach everything as easily as possible so I play the closest and keep rotating those pieces like a starting line-up for a team.

And like Antilles, above a bunch of us have lots of Roland pieces.

And...and Zamise sold his Spectralis :shock: :shock: .
It's one of my favorite pieces, but funny that I NEVER use for what I bought it for.
MASTER DRUM GROOVEBOX. Lol. I must have made 3 tracks on there before it was slotted firmly as total tone module.
I love every category of sound it makes.

But back to you, you have a few pieces that are in that 'dream someday category' but it seems raw tone doesn't always increase in love as you climb the expense ladder.
I went from DSI MoPho to Tetra and then back to MoPho. There's about that little yellow box that does it.
Same thing from KORG microKORG to the silver XL and back to the original. Even though the XL did all the sounds of the microKORG bit for bit- something wasn't quite the same.
I looked at the Tempest but didn't pull the trigger. Instead I got sidetracked and starting inquiring about a dotcom modular system. Going to pull the trigger on that as soon as I figure out where I'm going to put it.
I sold my Minilogue but I'm already looking to buy another. For under $500 its a killer sounding analog synth. I prefer it over my Juno's and my Chroma Polaris.

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Stab Frenzy
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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by Stab Frenzy » Sat Nov 12, 2016 3:40 am

Automatic Gainsay wrote:
griffin avid wrote:Damnnit man. What do you mean?
If you listen to recordings of Moog modulars, ARPS, and other instruments from 1971 or so, there is a character that they possess. This character comes about from a number of design and component choices, a lot of electronic limitations, and the ears of the engineers who designed them. These instruments have a certain tone.

[snip]

Bob Moog and Dave Smith started making analog synths again, but both of them were subject to the stability of pitch requirements of people making popular electronic music. Due to the requirements of the time, their synths had to be really pitch-stable, as well as feature modern features. This meant that their synthesizers, while great, didn't sound like the really vintage analogs.

And then, in the 10s, when other companies jumped on the bandwagon, they followed suit... making very pitch-stable devices with really stable and perfect waveforms, low noise, no distortion, etc. The result is analog sound, but it becomes challenging to discern it from the finally-really-great sounds made by digital synths and software. Analog function is REALLY easy to emulate digitally, but analog tone was not.

So, the result was that the analog synths sound great but lack the one of really vintage analog synths, and digital synths have introduced enough variation to sound effectively like analog... but still not VINTAGE analog. So, people became confused about what was actually THE POINT of pursuing analog.

Today's consumers grew up at a time where all they knew was that analog was in some way desirable. So, that notion, and the fun of good knob-per-function interfaces, is somewhat attractive to them. But at the same time, they require perfection in pitch, no noise at all ever, digital LFO shapes for sync, etc., digital integration for DAWs, and a host of other functions and applications that are more suited to modern music than anything remotely connected with that which made analog desirable in the first place.

And many would say, "so what?" And fair enough. But that's why I say analog really isn't that analog anymore.
Ah, now I understand why you always say things like this, you're equating DSI and new Moog synths with "new analogue". If you're looking for the sound of vintage analogue that you describe then you should be looking at the HUGE amount of stuff that's available from the new modular companies. The sound you want is there, you're just looking in the wrong place. :thumbright:

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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by Mooger5 » Sun Nov 13, 2016 6:47 pm

I don´t know about engineers shaping the sound according to what sounds best to them, with the exception of the Minimoog that was a group effort... if you ask an engineer to design a triangle wave oscillator he/she will try to use the technology and component tolerances currently available and make the waveshape as triangular as it can be, not something resembling a shark´s fin or the back of a stegosaurus that were the "norm" back then. If they could use today´s tech to make it 100% according to spec, they would. The "musicality of early analogue was just a side effect. Even Bob Moog asked Wolfgang Palm "why don´t you digital guys design digital filters?" once. Also the same could be true about samplers: earlier ones sound "musically more satisfying" than the latest. As soon as the tech evolved to "CD quality" something appealling got lost. It could have something to do with the novelty of the technology that once it gets matured it makes the listeners to go "meh". Therefore vintage digital sounds better than new analog. Or I may be talking a load of c**p. The evolution of VST instruments for instance is not in line with this thought. Neon doesn´t sound better than Diva.
Herrare umanum est.

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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by ninja6485 » Sun Nov 13, 2016 8:30 pm

Newer technology tends to offer increased power, which helps one accomplish more, and with greater clarity. Greater texture isusually more appealing than greater clarity, but it's harder to understand the importance of texture at first, even in the world of visual art.

Beginners often paint with too little paint, and their paintings look thin. They also tend to judge if the work is good by whether it looks like what it's supposed to be. On the other end of the spectrum, you have artists layering thick coats of paint with pronounced brush strokes to bring out the texture of the piece, while allowing the subject matter to sometimes look nothing, or very little, like what the artist is painting.

Very much the same relationship is true for sound as it is for shapes and colors. Things like older samplers cam give beautiful texture to sounds, much like the layered and textured colors of paint discussed above, while some newer, very capable, sampler software is more like a thinner painted attempt photorealism.

The upshot to the newer tech, is the clearer samplers could theoretically be used to alter sound transparently if there are problems with the original. With the older tech, you can't really get away with using it transparently. But I digress...
This looks like a psychotropic reaction. No wonder it's so popular...

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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by Automatic Gainsay » Mon Nov 14, 2016 2:49 am

Stab Frenzy wrote:Ah, now I understand why you always say things like this, you're equating DSI and new Moog synths with "new analogue". If you're looking for the sound of vintage analogue that you describe then you should be looking at the HUGE amount of stuff that's available from the new modular companies. The sound you want is there, you're just looking in the wrong place. :thumbright:
I don't think it's "looking in the wrong place" to find my desire for vintage satiated by vintage. :) As far as modern analog goes, I like it, and it's very nice. It's my job to work with it.

Also, I am absolutely certain that there is some very analogish stuff going on with Eurorack designers. But even so, it's not going to be as vintagey as vintage.
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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by clubbedtodeath » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:03 am

Automatic Gainsay wrote:I don't think it's "looking in the wrong place" to find my desire for vintage satiated by vintage. :) As far as modern analog goes, I like it, and it's very nice. It's my job to work with it.
Impressively short answer there, Marc.

Does resurrected vintage count as vintage? I gather a few subtle tweaks were made to the KARP Odyssey - but I can vouch that it is very stable whilst sporting extremely non-perfect waveforms, and sounds just like the original.

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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by muhammed » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:01 pm

ı have both vintange modular and eurorack modular systems
all my euro modules are %100 analog and ı think that my eurorack is far better than my rest of vintange analog synths in terms of flexiblity and the ability to do somehing different... I personally lost my interest against Vintange analogs if someone offers me vintange moog modular or cwejman I definetly prefer cwejman.
I can not understand people who enjoy the same sound that have done to many times before...

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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by gs » Tue Nov 15, 2016 9:01 pm

Hmmmm... well, this thread looks like as good a place as anything to count up all the synths I've owned (and sold) since the beginning... completely from memory. Not counting drum machines, software, and peripherals.

* = still in possession of.

-------------------------

1986
Korg DW-8000

1987
Korg Poly-61

1990
(Korg Poly-61 sold)

1993
Yamaha YS-200

1994
Yamaha Clavinova CLP-350 *

2003
Korg M1
Korg DSS-1
Roland JX-10
Roland Juno-106
(Roland Juno-106 returned)
(Yamaha YS-200 sold)

2004
Korg Z1 *
Alesis QS8.2 *
Kurzweil SP-88
(Kurzweil SP-88 returned)

2006
Roland JD-800
Rhodes Mark I Stage 73
SCI Pro-One

2007
(Korg DW-8000 sold)
(Rhodes Mark I Stage 73 sold)

2009
(Korg M1 sold)
(Korg DSS-1 sold)
(Roland JX-10 sold)

2010
Kawai K3M *
(SCI Pro-One sold)

2012
Alesis ION *
(Roland JD-800 sold)

-------------------------

You see a huge 10-year gap between 1994 and 2003. Oddly enough, that was one of my most musically productive times (in various bands, recorded an album with a band, and recorded 2 solo albums).

The YS-200 was one of the true royal turds I've ever owned, yet I still got some use out of it (mostly for digital FM pads/textures).

From 2003 to 2006 I was going through a "finally get to buy synths from the 80s I lusted after but couldn't afford back in the day" period. But two of the synths I still have/use were bought during that time (not 80s synths).

The Z1 still stands as THE most useful synth purchase I've ever made. It gets used in every synth rig that I set up, and it has paid for itself 10 times over from gigging. It's one I will probably never get rid of.

Starting around 2007 I started to sell off gear I wasn't using anymore or no longer fascinated by. Started gigging more, and less time in the studio, so just needed to get practical and pare it down to what's needed.

The last adjustment I needed to make was to replace the Pro-One with a lead synth that has memories, polyphony, and stays in tune (for practical gigging purposes). Acquisition of the ION completed that. Now I'm happy with what I have and every synth gets used, almost daily.
Kurzweil PC3, Yamaha MOX8, Korg Z1, Alesis Ion, Alesis QS8.2, Kawai K3M

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Re: Your lifelong equipment list

Post by JamesPerez » Wed Nov 16, 2016 8:37 am

Thanks for sharing.

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