Dntel, Dosh, Boards of Canada

Discussions on sound production outside the synthesizer such as mixing, processing, recording, editing and mastering.
SamGarvin
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 10:23 pm

Dntel, Dosh, Boards of Canada

Post by SamGarvin » Mon Dec 17, 2007 1:47 am

How do they do thier s**t? Ive tried so hard, and i cant figure out how they do all the things they do, the beats are all intricate and so personalized, and the mixing is rediculous. Someone help me?

User avatar
Stab Frenzy
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9723
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:41 pm
Gear: Eurorack, RYTM, Ultranova, many FX
Location: monster island*
Contact:

Post by Stab Frenzy » Mon Dec 17, 2007 2:01 am

Lots of practice, being really creative and not being afraid to experiment. Sorry there's no easy answer, but if there was then great music wouldn't be so special.

If you want to get good at making really intricate beats then get into your drum editor and spend hours working on one track. Never just work on a four bar section and loop it, that's boring. Hard work is the key.

Try making a track in a day whenever you can, don't be tempted to work on anything else and don't stop until you think it's pretty close to finished. After a while you'll notice you're improving.

User avatar
hageir
Expert Member
Expert Member
Posts: 1222
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:57 pm
Gear: http://www.geirhelgi.com/
https://soundcloud.com/geir-helgi
Band: Geir Helgi
Location: Reykjavík, Iceland
Contact:

Post by hageir » Mon Dec 17, 2007 2:18 am

eh, talent? :lol:
also, trying to be original; i.e. not copying other people?
Elektron MnM & MD UW, DSI MEK & Prophet REV2 16 Voices baby!, Ensoniq VFX & ESQ-1, SE-1X, Korg MS-20mini, Polysix, SH-101 (red), 707, CR-8000, KPR-77, PO-12, Yamaha C1 Music Computer, Synare PS-1, FX, mixers, some more stuff..

User avatar
JSRockit
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 3911
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:15 pm
Location: New York City

Post by JSRockit » Mon Dec 17, 2007 2:22 am

Stab Frenzy wrote: Never just work on a four bar section and loop it, that's boring.
While this is true sometimes..some of the best beatmakers of our time have done exactly this...and even less...ie 1-2 bar stuff. Repitition in music is not necessarily a bad thing.
Korg Volcas / 6 x TE POs / MicroBrute / EH Space Drum & Crash Pad

User avatar
wiss
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 2138
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2006 10:03 pm
Gear: it's all being sold to fund new gear
Location: Chicago

Post by wiss » Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:07 am

I am ok if the beat remains the same as long as its a good groove
"All we used was the explosion and the orchestra hit. The Fairlight was a $100,000 waste of space."

SamGarvin
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 10:23 pm

Post by SamGarvin » Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:08 am

Yeah, i figured practice was the key. Do you think they use more then one drum track per song? thats the only way i can figure they could do it.

To be clear, im not trying to copy them and i have original ideas of my own, but i feel like they are so good at what they do that if i were to be that good and add my ideas to it i could come up with something better.
Last edited by SamGarvin on Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Amos
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:17 pm
Location: Between 0 and +5V

Post by Amos » Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:24 am

Stab Frenzy wrote:Try making a track in a day whenever you can, don't be tempted to work on anything else and don't stop until you think it's pretty close to finished.
this is pretty much the only way I finish any music that is fresh, original or good. I have to have unbroken time to get all the way into the project and fully realize an idea. I just can't connect as well across multiple sessions, with their associated distractions. I've definitely found that over the years I am getting closer to actually writing the same ideas that sounded good in my head, and it's taking less time (work in the studio) to get closer.

I second the recommendation of a focused approach, and lots of time spent experimenting.
"The tb-303 sounds like poo and I think I could sell it for way more if I need some gas money, but no other poo sounds as pooey as it, plus it has a sequencer..." - Zamise

SamGarvin
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 10:23 pm

Post by SamGarvin » Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:32 am

What would be some other good ways to practice? In hindsight, that is what i was really trying to ask.

clubbedtodeath
No Longer Registered

Post by clubbedtodeath » Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:32 am

Haegir- if you can't help, resist the urge to type.

Sam-

I tried to learn some BoC tricks a few years ago. It's a good exercise in synthesis and sound production (which is where I'm going to move this topic). You'll probably end up sounding nothing like them, but you'll learn a lot in the process.

I suggest you begin with Boards of Canada's older stuff first, such as A few old tunes and Twoism. Start by focussing on particular elements of the music (bass / leads / drums) and try experimenting to emulate the same sound. You'll have more precise questions to ask, next time you come on here.

Remember, it doesn't take a lot of expensive equipment to recreate their sound. I wrote an album pretty much on a handful of synths, cheap effects units, and free software plugins. You can hear the results here:

http://www.clubbedtodeath.net/cd.php

It's not quite BoC, but not entirely shite-sounding either (I hope!). Stick with it; that sound may seem unattainable just now, but with practice, who knows?

SamGarvin
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 10:23 pm

Post by SamGarvin » Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:43 am

Thanks Clubbed, i know my questions were very imprecise, i just didnt know where to start. And your exactly right, i dont want to be them, i just like what they do.

User avatar
Stab Frenzy
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9723
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:41 pm
Gear: Eurorack, RYTM, Ultranova, many FX
Location: monster island*
Contact:

Post by Stab Frenzy » Mon Dec 17, 2007 5:56 am

JSRockit wrote:
Stab Frenzy wrote: Never just work on a four bar section and loop it, that's boring.
While this is true sometimes..some of the best beatmakers of our time have done exactly this...and even less...ie 1-2 bar stuff. Repitition in music is not necessarily a bad thing.
Look at the kind of stuff the OP mentioned, that's what I'm responding to.

User avatar
TrondC
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 1280
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 9:47 am
Gear: Machinedrum UW & Monomachine Mk2's
Korg KP3 & Zero 4
Band: Siesta Submarina

Post by TrondC » Mon Dec 17, 2007 12:22 pm

well, as far as i remember, BoC get their sound by spending ridiculous amounts of time sampling, mangling, chopping and layering samples.. it takes lots of time, but the results are good. check out DJ Shadow's "Endtroducing" for even more hard work. IMO, that album is one of the most interesting sampling-works I've ever heard

User avatar
JSRockit
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 3911
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:15 pm
Location: New York City

Post by JSRockit » Mon Dec 17, 2007 2:41 pm

Stab Frenzy wrote:
JSRockit wrote:
Stab Frenzy wrote: Never just work on a four bar section and loop it, that's boring.
While this is true sometimes..some of the best beatmakers of our time have done exactly this...and even less...ie 1-2 bar stuff. Repitition in music is not necessarily a bad thing.
Look at the kind of stuff the OP mentioned, that's what I'm responding to.
True... but you seemed to make a blanket statement that 4 bar loops are boring in general. If not, :oops:
Korg Volcas / 6 x TE POs / MicroBrute / EH Space Drum & Crash Pad

User avatar
JSRockit
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 3911
Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:15 pm
Location: New York City

Post by JSRockit » Mon Dec 17, 2007 2:44 pm

TrondC wrote:check out DJ Shadow's "Endtroducing" for even more hard work. IMO, that album is one of the most interesting sampling-works I've ever heard
Yeah, way to make him feel like he should give up (after listening to that)...

To me, I say start simple... like early RZA (Wu Tang) and then work your way up from there. Start with basic beats that sound right and then add to that over time as you get more used to working with your equipment. If you listen to early BOC, it isn't too complex. It's not that later stuff is very complex either...it is just layered, mixed and processed very well.
Korg Volcas / 6 x TE POs / MicroBrute / EH Space Drum & Crash Pad

User avatar
xibalba
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 502
Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 4:24 am
Location: .............
Contact:

Post by xibalba » Mon Dec 17, 2007 3:22 pm

there is a youtube video on DNTEL (doesnt explain his process) but gives insight to all of his gear (its very informative) try searching on youtube for it as i am at work right now and do not have access to youtube

Locked