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Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Fri Jul 17, 2009 12:48 pm
by Sexor
Just gain the h**l out of everything. Digital +10dB for the win! Let the constraints of the digital format handle the limiting! :headbang:

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 1:33 am
by gmeredith
I usually record each instrument track at just under 0db at its loudest point in the song, no compression usually. Then I eq each track individually, add effects and then mix down to a stereo wav file. Then I do a light compression on the mix down, then eq it if necessary. Then I find a good sounding top 40 song (or something in a similar type of style to mine that sounds really good) and rip it to a wav file, and open it next to mine, and compare them visually. I then try some compression on mine to get the wav to appear similar to it, and then play them back in turn, comparing mine with the volume of the ripped song.

Cheers, graham

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 3:29 am
by shaft9000
Joey wrote:okay well lets say I'm doing my own mastering job
pause - reality check

you realize that a mastering studio has $25,000+ of gear SPECIFIC for mastering and nothing else?
not to mention the experience and training of a qualified mastering engineer.

Good luck getting the same level of sound

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 3:54 am
by Joey
shaft9000 wrote:
Joey wrote:okay well lets say I'm doing my own mastering job
pause - reality check

you realize that a mastering studio has $25,000+ of gear SPECIFIC for mastering and nothing else?
not to mention the experience and training of a qualified mastering engineer.

Good luck getting the same level of sound
thank you captain obvious

if you read the rest of my post, you would see what i'm getting at, something quick and dirty to throw on websites

when I finish my record i will pay to have it professionally mastered, but until then, since you offered nothing constructive in your post, would you kindly f**k off?

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 4:09 am
by gmeredith
$25,000+ of gear SPECIFIC for mastering
is exactly WHY he's mastering it himself and not paying big $$ getting it mastered professionally - especially just for web space use!

Cheers, Graham

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Wed Jul 29, 2009 2:56 pm
by ipassenger
For rough mixes/jams etc.. I just tend to tame the transients (with limiters, compressors and or maximisers), maybe gaining an extra 3-5 db of peak signal level. If it still doesn't sound loud enough then cut some subs and maybe some super highs, bring up the overall signal level and then do the first bit. The parrallel as well as serial comp trick mentioned earlier is a good one, I used it recently on something that was all soft synths and it did add some beef without giving you that flat wall mix sound.

Sometimes I think the fault lies with the mix itself and there being just too much dynamic in the original mix. When this is the case maximisers or limiters just make it sound hard and flat, as you need to process it too much. I like to test the untreated mix at several different levels and look for sounds which appear/disappear. If the mix doesn't change in shape but just gains detail as you ride the volume up your probably not far off.

All of the above really depends on the sound your going for though and you certainly don't need £10K of pounds of kit to make it sound better. I think more important is another set of ears, someone you trust and has a decent listening enviroment. Even if they don't make the adjustments they can at least give you a reality check.

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 6:51 am
by maindeglorie
shaft9000 wrote:
Joey wrote:okay well lets say I'm doing my own mastering job
pause - reality check

you realize that a mastering studio has $25,000+ of gear SPECIFIC for mastering and nothing else?
not to mention the experience and training of a qualified mastering engineer.

Good luck getting the same level of sound

Although what you say here is true... you would be really shocked at the amount of major label records mastered on nothing more than a few pieces of outboard gear and Bias Peak.

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 1:27 am
by synth3tik
I like to use the rule that compression is right when you can't hear the compressor. Obviously this can get confusing when sidechaining.

What really helped me out was to view the waveforms of the mix downs. I do not want to have a bunch of hot dog looking files. After a few times going though I was able to get a good loud track, but the dynamics as still there.
I do agree with people that you should work the tracks around -03db and let a mastering engineer get the dynamics tight.

I got the mixing on my current album project really good. I could barely tell the difference when I got it back from the mastering house. and yes they did do a good job.

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Fri Aug 28, 2009 5:03 pm
by filtersweeperVCO
bottom line is this: if your tune is quiet, people won't play it. As the world turns, so do they ways we make music. Music is more compressed so that a wall of sound is being pushed at the listener. It's up to you wether or not you want your stuff to sound like "what normal is these days". If you're making electronic music, which I assume you are because of the forum we're on, then face the facts. Dj's wouldn't be playing my tunes if they weren't loud. Even if I told them "Oh I'm not following the trend, and I'd like to maintain some of the dynamics" YOu decide.

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 7:09 pm
by rickyd
Instead of compressing anything, why not just use the master fader on your mixer (or DAW's mixer or whatever) to boost the volume?

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:20 pm
by shaft9000
Yoozer wrote:
Joey wrote: and I find it very hard to have the track be loud enough
How about letting the user turn up the volume instead of doing it for him?
+1
unless you're aiming for lowest-common-denominator 'earbud mixes' -that sound good pushing the amp on ghetto beatboxes and fit right in to modern pop playlists - then no-one that actually cares how good it sounds is going to be playing it on some weeny system.
they can easily turn it up, and will.

make music for music-lovers and not as commodity, i say.
do what you will.

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:43 am
by astroidmist
Personally, i think perceptual loudness increases with good and successful EQ combined with lite to moderate individual channel compression and master stereo limiting.

But I wouldnt try to make it louder on purpose. Usually that happens as a side effect of the limited EQ boosts. But it only goes so far.

Try to keep a good crest factor ratio.

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 2:06 am
by tallowwaters
rickyd wrote:Instead of compressing anything, why not just use the master fader on your mixer (or DAW's mixer or whatever) to boost the volume?
?

I take it you don't understand what compression/limiting actually do, or what will actually happen if you push your DAW into digital clipping.

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 2:40 am
by Stab Frenzy
rickyd wrote:Instead of compressing anything, why not just use the master fader on your mixer (or DAW's mixer or whatever) to boost the volume?
Did you really need to bump an 18 month old thread to drop that little pearl of non-wisdom?

Re: How to NOT be overcompressed

Posted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:59 am
by ninja6485
i like this thread, and the rob acid video. just from my own experience, i never realized how pooly produced the old metal cd's i love sounded untill i started mixing my own songs. not because i got really good at mixing, but because before i was listening to the music way too loud and my ears fatigued. i was also gain-riding tracks, which i still do, but just at a much lower volume. it's funny now to see many of my friends making the same "mistakes," but they care more about the energy of the song then the way it sounds, or so it seems. i try to keep that in perspective when i mix my stuff, but i generally find that my better mixes naturally retain a louder rms then my less good mixes. without compressing at all, the loudest they come out is arround -12, -11 db, which seems to fit fine with the artists tracks that i listen to on a daily basis. not sure what you'd want if you're going to compress it, or what the ideal would be for distribution, aside from some guidelines already mentioned in this thread about peak db and such.