Electronic Music Equipment

Discussions on sound production outside the synthesizer such as mixing, processing, recording, editing and mastering.
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Rumbler101
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Electronic Music Equipment

Post by Rumbler101 » Sun Jun 29, 2014 1:47 am

Hi,

I know that the basis of an electronic music setup consists of: samplers, synthesisers, drum machines, bassline machines. However, here's my question: apart from those devices I listed above, what else can you have in a studio that people generally find handy? Doesn't really have to be just instruments, it can be anything studio related. I know you can have dynamic processors & effects but is there anything else that someone could have in a studio that an artist would use? Would artists use dynamic processors & effects or would that be the task of a mastering engineer instead?

sol-bass-rec
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Re: Electronic Music Equipment

Post by sol-bass-rec » Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:08 am

Not to be a smarty pants but things you didn't mention.

Speakers
Computer (an expensive one for music only or used Alienware)
Audio Interface
Computer DAW (Protools Logic Studio One Ableton)

Those things that you are wanting to know the names of
Mic Preamps
Vocalizers and Harmonizes
Compressors
Reverb and delays

You can get several racks with all of those "in one" pretty cheap if you are a beginner? Behringer, Gemini

Also the efx (distortions, delays, gate, reverb) can be had several ways. On board some instruments, racks, pedals or in your software.

If you're wanting to get into this addiction as a hobby or a way to support the local bands, you may be surprised and find a local community college or community television station with classes. If you live near a city of 200,000 u may be in luck. Guitar Center and Sam Ash both have mixing and master classes though they are more than likely in pro Tools or Ableton.

1 truth about engineering/musicians. We get a little high maintenance when we start figuring out our sounds. In other words there are way too many options out there and we are constantly returning, exchanging and refunding. That is the main reason to shop local, if you can.

If you can afford it ($2,000) Persons makes a 16 channel digital (uses firewire, instead of usb) mixer. The 16.4.2 is nice in that you can load (live) two efx per channel.
It also comes with a DAW (studio one) this mixer can be used in live recording settings or it can be used to control it's software and possibly some other.

I just bought one myself as I have a lot of drum machines and keyboards. It suited my needs because I was graduating from Reason and didn't want to ride the Ableton wave or get overly worked in pro tools.

tascam also makes some pretty cheap recording and editing desktop mixers.

You don't need an engineering degree to mix down or master but having some basic knowledge (remember the first time you thought your mother how to attach in an email?)

Because I get the feeling you're wanting to pick up a hobby or support the local bands, you can have one of these on a 12 payment plan at AMS, ZZounds maybe even sweetwater.

If you are completely new and younger it's time to throw on your running shoes and go to the local recording studio if you can't find a program. Go to any one of these 21st century churches with lots of music and approach the guy running the mixing board (after service)

You don't have to spend 50,40,30,20 or even 10 grand to have a nice hobby or project studio. If this is your first time try it on a computer where you can spend the least bit of money.

I have a friend with well over 400 singles to his credit. This guy turns out Breakbeat Electro all the time using Ableton.

It all depends on what your goals are, what you want to accomplish? Composing and producing? Recording others? Mixing and mastering services or a little bit of everything. More importantly, how much are you willing to spend and how much money do you have to invest plus time (Full time service, hobby or a way to score dj groupies?

I didn't have a budget but I've done this before. I've spent over $20,000 in 3 months and I'm not done. But I do have contract work, remix work, dj broadcasts and my own instrument addictions.

If you don't know synths, I highly suggest going the computer route. The Audio interface you have will also have midi in which you can run tons of virtual synths from a Midi Controller.

After computer, speakers and audio interface you can for under $1000 have dozens of Virtual Synths and hundreds of efx.

Good luck and try to stay away from ebay. The only thing more addictive than the gear itself
"Music is the drug"

Rumbler101
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Re: Electronic Music Equipment

Post by Rumbler101 » Tue Jul 01, 2014 2:32 am

Very informative post, thank you.

Yeah, I'm more interested in the gear route/hardware route. I know lots of people get gear fever but I'm only buying stuff I really need and getting rid of stuff I no longer need. A lot of old school Electronic songs were created with minimal equipment and that's truly my aim -- to not go overboard. It's just the other stuff outside of the instruments that I'm not 100 percent sure on.

Thank you for your help again.

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ninja6485
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Re: Electronic Music Equipment

Post by ninja6485 » Tue Jul 01, 2014 5:31 pm

For me, I have:
- sound sources: synths, samplers, drum machines, live instruments and various odds and ends, as wall as computer generated sounds

- signal processors: effects, samplers, dynamics and an eq

- composition tools: a lot of folks record onto a computer and arrange their audio files there. I record onto a sampler, and arrange my audio files on the sampler by way of a midi sequencer

- mixing, monitoring and recording devices: The sampler, and whatever part I want to add to what I'm working on will go into a mixer, and out to a pair of monitors. Sometimes I will use a mixer between sound sources and the sampler. I then record the track onto a small digital recorder; either from the sampler directly, or from the mixers outs if I'm using it with other gear (or if I'm using the individual outs.) Often I will have recorded my sound sources directly onto the digital recorder as well, moving the files onto a computer to clean them up and equalize or compress where necessary before moving them back to the digital recorder before they go to the sampler (or move it over directly depending on the sampler). After I have recorded the track, I usually move it onto a computer and practice post production techniques with it. Sometimes signal processing devices make their way into this sphere of audio production as well.

It is worthy to note that there are many paths; all roads lead to rome, etc, etc
This looks like a psychotropic reaction. No wonder it's so popular...

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Re: Electronic Music Equipment

Post by ellaguru » Wed Jul 02, 2014 2:50 pm

ninja6485 wrote: - composition tools: a lot of folks record onto a computer and arrange their audio files there. I record onto a sampler, and arrange my audio files on the sampler by way of a midi sequencer
that is intersting for me, because i use to do the same, i use mainly an mc909 or/with xxxxxx (could be SP505 or 606 or 303 or asrx or esx or st224 or su10), sometimes i also mix up all the things into the machine (mc909), but most of the time on software, at least the Mastering. What sampler do you use to do all that (your arranging and stuff, i mean)? Just curious

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ninja6485
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Re: Electronic Music Equipment

Post by ninja6485 » Wed Jul 02, 2014 7:51 pm

ellaguru wrote:
ninja6485 wrote: - composition tools: a lot of folks record onto a computer and arrange their audio files there. I record onto a sampler, and arrange my audio files on the sampler by way of a midi sequencer
that is intersting for me, because i use to do the same, i use mainly an mc909 or/with xxxxxx (could be SP505 or 606 or 303 or asrx or esx or st224 or su10), sometimes i also mix up all the things into the machine (mc909), but most of the time on software, at least the Mastering. What sampler do you use to do all that (your arranging and stuff, i mean)? Just curious
Right now I'm using an EMU E6400 ultra, but for a long time I used an S2000. I loved the S5000 for this purpose, but mine has some strange power supply issue, so I've set it aside for a while. The s1000 was hard to beat, but it has such a small amount of memory that you really have to get creative, or stick to small samples. I used to record onto the s1000, edit the samples and programs on it, and then load them into the s2000 for play back. So far I'm very pleased with the 6400. I'm toying with the idea of getting something like a TC finalizer 96k to go in between the sampler and the recorder instead of doing post production on a computer. :mrgreen: How do you like the mc909? Do you record separate takes for each part after you've written it, and then multi-track in a computer, or do you just record the stereo outs and then do post production?
This looks like a psychotropic reaction. No wonder it's so popular...

ellaguru
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Re: Electronic Music Equipment

Post by ellaguru » Wed Jul 02, 2014 10:36 pm

ninja6485 wrote: Right now I'm using an EMU E6400 ultra, but for a long time I used an S2000. I loved the S5000 for this purpose, but mine has some strange power supply issue, so I've set it aside for a while. The s1000 was hard to beat, but it has such a small amount of memory that you really have to get creative, or stick to small samples. I used to record onto the s1000, edit the samples and programs on it, and then load them into the s2000 for play back. So far I'm very pleased with the 6400. I'm toying with the idea of getting something like a TC finalizer 96k to go in between the sampler and the recorder instead of doing post production on a computer. :mrgreen:
ok, and what's your main sequencer?
ninja6485 wrote: How do you like the mc909? Do you record separate takes for each part after you've written it, and then multi-track in a computer, or do you just record the stereo outs and then do post production?
recently i like to produce/arrange/mix the main parts in the box; sometimes it happens that the mix is not clear enough for some reasons and so i sort out some parts from the separate outs. The sequencer and editing are very cool, the sampler is cool. FX too. the Mixer side is ok. i modded the file capacity (128mb smartmedia) with an XD card (now 256mb). you cannot downsampling with it (but i use all the SPs or st224 for -also- that aim)

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