EMU MP7 vs RS7000

A forum for comparing two or more synths against each other. Also known as "versus" threads.
User avatar
visceralvoids
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 142
Joined: Thu May 26, 2011 6:10 am
Gear: Access Virus TI - Roland JD990 - Sequential Drumtraks - Novation 61SLmkII
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Contact:

EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by visceralvoids » Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:19 am

Emu MP7 Command Station vs. RS7000:

Both were made around the same time but RS7000 has sampling. I know some of you swear by your RS7000s, but don't know who uses a Emu Command Station around here.
I am mainly making rap and industrial beats. I know that both of these are revered for their great sequencers. I like the Emu MP7's tight sound quality and it's more hiphop ROM focused. But I had a Yamaha S03 and AN200 long ago and liked the sounds. I was mostly wondering about the sounds on the RS7000 because I want to use it as a sound module, to add with my Roland JP-8000, and the MP7 or RS7000 drums. Anyone have any thoughts?

adekoyote
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:33 pm
Gear: YAMAHA PSR460, ROLAND MC808, EDIROL, APC20, Emu Proteus 2500 and Yamaha RS7000, Yamaha Su700, Roland VP9000, Yamaha AW4416, Desktop Evolver
Band: The Ghostz of More

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by adekoyote » Mon Oct 03, 2011 8:23 pm

I have just bought an rs7000 and an e-mu proteus 2500. they are en route. I will be able to give u better insight in about 6 months to a year...due to their depth...but I can tell you why I bought them both. My first groovebox is an MC808. I love it, but the truth is that I despise the sequencer...and I love the roms and the synthesizer...and the realtime controls, chord function, effects, arpeggiator. but the sequencer is s**t, and I use ableton to sequence, via USB.

about the rs7000. it is a sampling groovebox...so it has some ROM and the samples, and a synth...the immediate benefit is that you can always upgrade your own waveforms. 64 voice polyphony has me worried. but I am really stoked about the remix feature and the live play set...alot of knobs and a good sized LCD screen...SCSI...no usb...What I am hoping for is a better sequencer that lends itself to long form playability and improvisation, and easier sampling.

the emu series seems to depend on those ROMS...but...from what I understand the system of operation is sick. That means deeper sequencers arpeggios. not to mention multiple studio outs , 128 voice polyphony, and USB midi.

The thing that is eye catching about the EMU's is the evolution of the beastie. On top of the standard patches, you also have BEATS, Riffs and Patterns preprogrammed. So theoretically one has several methods of building up a groove...which is really hip as long as you can change the patch assignments to those patterns...and if you invest in more ROMS, then you extend this aspect of the box.

If you are looking for a MIDI brain and this is primarily for percussion...the yamaha has an important strength: free sample waveform upgrade.

If you are looking for out of the box fire and forget functionality, MP7...with the added, not often recognized vaule of 3 multiple outs...and another huge advantage is 128 voices.

this is me just making observation from manuals, youtube videos, sound on sound reviews, etc. I will write more on this once the two pieces are in my possession.

take care.

User avatar
visceralvoids
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 142
Joined: Thu May 26, 2011 6:10 am
Gear: Access Virus TI - Roland JD990 - Sequential Drumtraks - Novation 61SLmkII
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Contact:

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by visceralvoids » Tue Oct 04, 2011 6:05 am

adekoyote wrote:about the rs7000. it is a sampling groovebox...so it has some ROM and the samples, and a synth...the immediate benefit is that you can always upgrade your own waveforms. 64 voice polyphony has me worried. but I am really stoked about the remix feature and the live play set...alot of knobs and a good sized LCD screen...SCSI...no usb...What I am hoping for is a better sequencer that lends itself to long form playability and improvisation, and easier sampling.

the emu series seems to depend on those ROMS...but...from what I understand the system of operation is sick. If you are looking for a MIDI brain and this is primarily for percussion...the yamaha has an important strength: free sample waveform upgrade.
Thanks for your input. One thing I heard about the E-mu was you can do almost everything without leaving record mode which is a definite plus. I don't think RS7000 can multitask while running in pattern record mode. Both still have great sequencers... also when you said "free sample waveform upgrade", do you mean resampling the RS7000 internal sounds?

adekoyote
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:33 pm
Gear: YAMAHA PSR460, ROLAND MC808, EDIROL, APC20, Emu Proteus 2500 and Yamaha RS7000, Yamaha Su700, Roland VP9000, Yamaha AW4416, Desktop Evolver
Band: The Ghostz of More

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by adekoyote » Tue Oct 04, 2011 8:37 pm

"free sample waveform upgrade" means that you have a smartcard to allow more .wav or .aiff files. Back when these types of products were produced, this was MAJOR. It means that you can import anything from any sample libraries...which means that the unit is easily expandable IF you get tired of the PCM ROM waveforms that have been made available to you.

Resampling is definitely common practice on sample based grooveboxes

The only way that the e-mu series of grooveboxes can do this in an cost effective/time efficient manner is to route the midi INTO a DAW or rack synth or groovebox. with the command station and proteus 2500 this is a bit easier because there is midi USB that can be sent into ableton and out into a synth or a sampler, software or hardware.

I am saying this because sometimes people are not in the mood to d**k around making new sounds or patching cables...combining sounds and patches. I love doing it. but when time is of the essence...we often need to prioritize what we are trying to accomplish...unless you live rent free and your synth obsession is actively paying your existence on the planet. You have to prioritize.

the sequencer on both units are said to be rock solid...and you have auto patterns you can assign to the tracks. the e-mu has the polyphony advantage. and if you are into arpeggiation, this needs to be considered...62 voices polyphony is ok, but if you get into anything remotely multi timbral, WHILE your drums are playing...you will need to watch you s**t...this can lead to drop out.

its really still a neck and neck debate. everyone loves both units playabilty. From what I gather from your posts...in the interest of your music type...I would lean toward the RS7000.

expandable, via memory...so samples can be loaded up and you get to move on.

you have previous experience with yamaha's system of operation.

You don't necessary need 128 voices if you resample.

lots of realtime controls.

The problem the case of the e-mu has is that while being expandable, it is expensive. for each rom its 75-200+...and you will spend more time tweaking via the mod matrix to make that investment worth it.

I would say get them both if time and money permits.

User avatar
Zamise
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 2352
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2004 2:41 am
Gear: Rollhand P00
Band: Quantum-Source
Location: DenverMetroUSA, Quantum-Source.com
Contact:

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by Zamise » Wed Oct 05, 2011 12:32 pm

You can multitask on the RS to a certain extent. You do have to stop to do job functions and sampling. However, you can go in and out of record while playing and bounce around tracks while stepping in notes as long as the phrases are the same length on the tracks. Not sure about linear song mode tho, I've never tried to do it there, but it can in Pattern mode with an updated OS v1.2x. But, one of the interesting things with the RS is that you aren't stuck with having each track in Pattern mode the same length or time signature. I try to keep most my tracks at 4x4x4 so I can bounce around while entering notes, but mostly because it gets confusing pretty fast to me otherwise, plus that is the default.

Don't listen to anyone who says the voices/sounds are c**p. The sounds in it are great, you just have to work at it a little, the built in phrases, are c**p, so don't plan on using those much, you have to make your own and learn to edit and tweak the sounds. The RS is very inviting in this area if you know how to compose rather than DJing your gear and give it a chance, just look at all those knobs!

You prob won't even use your JP if you get good enough with the RS. I had an 8080 for a short time, they are pretty to look at, but felt I had it covered already, it couldn't pull me away from my RS. My AN1x sounded better with the RS, so I've kept my AN1X. I've thought about trying an AN200 with the RS, might be even better since it'd add additional tracks.

If poly is a prob on the RS, a second RS might be an excellent answer ;) Nothing wrong with having two of them to double your fun. I rarely reach the poly limit on one, but find I can fill up 16 tracks pretty quickly on it. Just keep things like recorded filter sweeps down to a couple tracks at any one single time if you have all the tracks filled up, those are the events that start stressing the RS out the most. Use the programmable LFO when can to sweep, it doesn't take up poly, free tip for ya.

I could go on all day about the RS and my experience with the EMUs isn't much, so I'll shut up now, but if you have any questions about it your welcome to ask me. If you get an RS be sure to sign up over on the Yahoo Group and or the new proboard forum.

Zam
<ZQS> [....<OII>.....soundcloud player v2.42.....................link]

blavatsky
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 451
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 3:54 pm
Gear: MV8800, Sub37, Integra 7, Mininova, Fusion, Biscuit, TimeFactor, SP-555, SP-404, SPD-SX
Band: Blavatsky
Contact:

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by blavatsky » Wed Oct 05, 2011 3:56 pm

^ this guy is an RSk7k expert, which i am not, but i'll chime in too since i've had both (and sold the one headed to adekoyote :))

Now I see you make rap/industrial, so the MP7 soundbank may be more useful to you; for me, I did not find that many great sounds on it; some drum kits and effects, very few keys or basses I liked. Anyway, the pads were great, filters from great, effects - imo kind of hard to setup, and when you did meh - sequencer was great but .... to me not so much fun to work on. A LOT of keystrokes/menu digging to fix / redo stuff. I ended up using it 90% sequencer/10% sounds but got tired of the workflow on it.

RS7k despite its age, is a *monster* as a drum machine or sequencer. Yes, the synth/rompler sounds in it are also great like zamise said, especially with filter/effects (btw effects on the RS7k are very usable and musical) , but using their drum kits and (even better) your sampled drums along w/ the compressor/loop remix/ different patterns - I could play all day with just drum loops. Plus, very easy to sequence other gear with. Add in a good mixer/EQ/master effect section and really its hard to top.

Only reason I sold mine was for $$$/space to make room for a roland MV, which is a cool piece (hard drive for samples, quicker to chop/process, VGA out) but the RS7k can do stuff the MV can't, and is a more hands on tweakable piece.

User avatar
visceralvoids
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 142
Joined: Thu May 26, 2011 6:10 am
Gear: Access Virus TI - Roland JD990 - Sequential Drumtraks - Novation 61SLmkII
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Contact:

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by visceralvoids » Sun Oct 09, 2011 9:42 pm

Well you guys have provided lots of food for thought here, some things that I never even considered.
At this point the MP7 workflow looks like it's going to end up pissing me off, plus I don't want to spend 200 bucks each on all the good ROMs for it. I discovered that I can always find MP7s for real cheap locally, just like the drum machine I had before, the Akai XR20 (only sold because I needed cash.) The RS7000 seems much more broad, easier to work with, and would make a killer centerpiece. I'm planning on using my JP as a "main synth" with this, as well as a MIDI controller for the RS7000 internal sounds (the Yamaha provides the type of sounds the JP can't do from scratch like realistic pianos etc.)

I'm leaning more towards the RS7000 or the Roland MC-909. There's just something about the MC-909 demos out there that bothers me - it sounds so polished and clean, maybe everyone is just using too many internal FX or the same ol' stock stuff? I really should get something like this or an RS7000 though because sampling opens up a huge door when it comes to making music, and either unit is fanstastic for messing with samples. If I do end up getting the RS7000 it'd be my first piece of Yamaha kit since 2003 (my AN200 and S03 were stolen then.)

It's funny the MV-8800 came up. All year I was gassing for a MV-8800 but determined if I'd get one it'll kill my budget, lol. What an amazing unit, sounds killer too.

adekoyote
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:33 pm
Gear: YAMAHA PSR460, ROLAND MC808, EDIROL, APC20, Emu Proteus 2500 and Yamaha RS7000, Yamaha Su700, Roland VP9000, Yamaha AW4416, Desktop Evolver
Band: The Ghostz of More

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by adekoyote » Sat Nov 05, 2011 3:44 am

I have the RS7000 and I must say it is a beast to work with. It is a dense, complex sequencer, which has an elegance in its layout.

I love it.

great for happy accident groove building via phrases.

the filters are very aggressive. you also get audio AND midi fx.

This groovebox is loud and aggressive...in a great way...and unlike the MC808, I felt comfortable without my computer....I find that the drawback of the rs7000 is loading times, saving time, and the synthesizer seems very straightforward...which is good in a certain way.

I also have the proteus 2500(related to the MP7)

I must say that I am stoopified on the sheer quality of the rom samples. These units are real winners just on acoustic samples alone...very rich sounding. The thing I am not so hyped on so far is the *apparent* quality of the filters...I could be wrong...but that is totally ok.

I could TOTALLY see the rs7000 as the brains behind a synth armada...but the truth is....expanding the sounds will depend on sampling...

BIG THANKS TO BLAVATSKY....

cartesia
Expert Member
Expert Member
Posts: 1287
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2007 7:55 am
Gear: Octatrack
Bass Station 2
Band: TBA

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by cartesia » Sun Nov 06, 2011 2:25 pm

Hey I think the real specialness of the filters in teh proteus 2k series (2000, 2500, comm station) is when you start using the z-planes... They can do pretty good filter sweeps because the character of the filter changes as you sweep, not just the cutoff level.. but without the z-plane use they are just plain old digital filters afaik.

I would also say this - me and a few others I know who've used command stations found it was hard to get a hot drum level out.. even when I had the protean drums rom, the best percussion, I still struggled to get really hot banging drums out of it compared to my other gear's levels.. even boosting them sounded a bit flat somehow...

The best thing IMO the CS has going for it is the x-mix function for live performance.

adekoyote
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:33 pm
Gear: YAMAHA PSR460, ROLAND MC808, EDIROL, APC20, Emu Proteus 2500 and Yamaha RS7000, Yamaha Su700, Roland VP9000, Yamaha AW4416, Desktop Evolver
Band: The Ghostz of More

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by adekoyote » Mon Nov 07, 2011 12:07 am

apologizing in advance for the long post...but the truth is the value of these machine is amazing. For the price point and the added benefit that your DAW CPU cycles are spared.

agreed on the drum levels. very very rich on the P25K, but the rs7000 is really winning out..."out of the box" without feeling the need to correct with software on plugins...but again I am just getting into both of them.

Thank you for the layman's explanation of the z-plane filter.

what is x-mix about?

I am quickly developing a love hate relationship with phrases in the rs7000...there are so many phrases, and the rs7000 just has this way of making very minute yet noticeable changes on the phrases. it is really an attention w***e...in that I stare at it alot alot...which is way different from the MC808...where I am more accustomed to looking at the computer screen...the rs7000 really has a way of making you fall deep into it.

Not everything on the RS7000 is rosy...the arpeggiator is kind of clunky...so far...but I will have to mix it with other midi tools. Another thing that confuses the living daylights out of me it having clear definitions of phrases and figuring out with instruments go with the phrase...

synthesis on the rs7000 doesn't seem too deep...yet but I could be missing a menu...the sounds are strong and usable...but soon those inputs will get used in conjunction with my sample library...still I don't see its synthesis engine on the same level as the MC808's...but the sampling function could be superior to the MC808's

I do like the drums on the Emus though...but more for layering than standalone...they have an acoustic quality I really haven't noticed in my other boxes...I am actually considering parking it bedside for a while...to see if I can learn the sequencer without feeling handicapped without a DAW.

I do have the luxury of having both at the same time...but in terms of immediate usability the rs7000 is laying down some mean competition. Sounds and thick, effects are eloquent and easy to understand...and the interface is easy to read at a glance...and I feel the interface has a unity and consistency about it.

So far:

MC808 still stands out for digital analog patch design...I became a big fan of the synthesis engine once I learned how to use it...its easy to either modify a preset or start up one of your own...but you do need a computer...and you have two stereo outs...with no expansion(bummer). The worst part of the box is the sequencer...I hated it at first...and then I realized that I actually had a fantom in a small form factor in permanent performance mode. Price: $500

RS7000 sequencer is empowering...elegant and real time...so many features that I had to emulate in Ableton. In the RS7000 it is a button or a knob...The filters on the RS7000 aggressive and available...price: $430 + 80 shipping(international)...the main drawback with knob oriented grooveboxes of this complexity is it is easy to forget filter settings on tracks.

EMU Proteus 2500 acoustic patches for days and days...everything sounds rich...albeit the low end frequency IS of concern, I am really psyched about not having to use my CPU to calculate reverb for acoustic sounds. The extra ROMS give me a great deal more of patches and kits...still have to review the situation in ableton...but it seems that the EMU will sit in the mid to higher registers in the mix...If using for drums or bass I will probably send into into the Soundtoys Decapitator vst. Price $286 via ebay sniping vigil($35 for shipping)

Both EMU CS and RS7K are highly recommended so far.

sawan
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 10:09 am

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by sawan » Mon Nov 07, 2011 2:10 am

a few months back i was going through this same quandry. i really wanted to move away from the computer screen and had narrowed my choices down to these 2 machines. after weighing the 2 up for quite a while and because workflow is really imprtant to me i ended up with an XL-7.

the sequencer is very versatile and compared to it's competitors allows you to do a lot more while the seq is running. unfortunately, you can't apply quantize or swing while it's running though, and this is definitely one of my annoyances with it. but i have a feeling that live quantize/swing isn't a very common feature in h/w sequencers anyway.

there's a fair amount of added features hidden in menus/shift button stuff with the OS updates so it will take a while to learn your way around and get everything running smooth without having to think/rtm too much. these are very good features though, so well worth the little bit of extra hassle.

overall it's an incredibly well thought out hardware seq with the bonus of having an impressive internal sound engine. a quote i think i read on GS not so long ago went along the lines of 'if they'd stuck a sampler in there they'd still be making the things'. which is very true. it's the one true thing that it sorely lacks. and it's a shame considering emu/ensoniq's pedigree in that arena. could have been a true contender for the mpc's throne. seriously.

anyway, seeing as i have no h/w sampler i was forced to use the MP-7 to trigger samples from within my DAW. kind of defeating the point of having it (not having to boot up the pc) but not too bad i guess. quicker for editing samples n stuff anyway, and i can just turn off the screen if i really wanted to. but, while i was at it, i tried using it as a master clock for ableton just to see how it handled it and noticed ableton's tempo wobbling all over the place. about +/-2bpm pretty much constantly. sometimes this would settle down after maybe 20 mins of the track running on loop, sometimes not.

ableton is known for not dealing with external sync very well, both as master and slave (although latest versions are suposed to have addressed this), and so i thought maybe this could be the source of the problem. but apparently not. it's since come to light that the command stations are a bit on the unstable side wrt tightness. this was a bit of a downer tbh, and since finding that out i've been pretty reluctant to power it up. to me tightness is one of the main priorities with these things. before the XL-7 i was really close to getting an ensoniq asr-x pro until i found out about the timing falling to pieces if you tried to tweak anything while the sequencer is playing.

it seems to mainly be a problem when external gear is being triggered along with the internal sounds on the XL-7. i keep meaning to do the rim shot test ala innerclock systems' tests to see if it really is the case, but haven't been near my studio for the last couple of months.

as i'm writing this i can imagine people wondering 'why didn't he notice the looseness from the start then, if it's so important?'

well, not sure i spent enough time with it to really get into making a proper tune. it definitey felt nicer than ableton usually does, when i was running it standalone. but yeah. maybe i'm chasing rainbows?

i also picked up a Kawai Q-80EX around the same time as the XL-7 but never got around to giving it much of a spin. it's a much more limited piece compare to the command station, but according to some, an MMT8 on steroids. it's only 96ppqn but apparently has some nice groove features including percentage. and if i think about it, a lot of my favorite music was made at that very resolution. so maybe i'll give i a shot.

oh, one more thing. i've read conflicting opinions on the tightness of the RS7000. some people say it's very tight (fwiw rdj supposedly used it to make the analord stuff) but others say it isn't. so if tightness is important to you then i'd investigate that matter a little further before you make a move.

'xcuse my rambling.

edit: i think i should just add that i haven't given up on it, contrary to the tone of this post. it's still a great machine to use. maybe the rim shot test will prove my informants wrong and it was all down to ableton after all?

User avatar
Zamise
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 2352
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2004 2:41 am
Gear: Rollhand P00
Band: Quantum-Source
Location: DenverMetroUSA, Quantum-Source.com
Contact:

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by Zamise » Sun Nov 13, 2011 4:19 am

@adekoyote - if you haven't figured out the phrases yet, those are your sequences or where the actual events are stored that get looped in pattern mode. The voices are not stored with the phrases, they are stored to the tracks, unless you are using the preset phrases which will swap out voices with them, I think until you change the voice then it stays on that voice even when you change phrases if I remember right. That is one of the reasons I try as little as possible to use the sucky preset phrases and rather always build my own from scratch. If you like a preset phrase and want to edit it, use the copy phrase job and copy it to a user phrase and switch it to that copied user phrase. Also, maybe change the Voice Hold setting F4 knob I think to On (might be shift F4?) it will hold all the voice settings if the phrase happens to contain a program change or when you are swapping out voices, otherwise they reset to their defaults each time which may be what is causing your sounds to change on you. Also, if you are having trouble knowing where the filters are, press #5 voice edit several times till you get to the last menu and it'll show their settings and you can even use the F knobs in that screen like an endless rotary which will keep the filter from jumping. Also, I agree the arp is c**p on the RS, its very basic and not programable, but the beauty of the RS is there are a lot of workarounds with it. What you can use instead of its c**p arp is actual sequences, record in arps from othher gear via midi, use the transpose button, or program in pitch changes with a groove template, or program a stepped LFO on pitch.

@sawan - AFAIK the RS7000 has a pretty steady clock, those rumors I think come about more from folks who've imported long samples and try to keep them synced at the same tempo when there is nothing there to keep them perfectly synced. The RS doesn't have a sample warper like folks are use to using on software where it'll match up at any tempo, it has a stretcher but it works in percentages so you have to figure that out on your own, the longer the sample the harder it is for any sampler to keep time this way. So shorter samples are better and using the slicer function may help a lot to split them up for you and be able to use difrent tempos. Also, I've never heard that RDJ uses one, that would be cool tho if so and wouldn't surprise me, I did read on some other board that his tech recomended one to somebody. Anyhow, I checked out some analord stuff and if he was using it and you want to do some similar drum stylings then the midi delay knob should come in handy on the RS for those stuttering type snares and bouncy sounds. The swing is not that useful to me either on the RS but it has a swing adjustment during play back and one for recording to help tighten things up, so I mostly use for when playing in notes and afterward if it still sucks since I can't keep time worth poo, so it helps quantize them a little tighter than I can play, but it don't help any while playing by hand. If it is the pattern breaks, there is a pattern quantize in utilities to also help keep patterns tight or loose can be cool too for stuttering effects. Also, the groove template function may come in handy too, but the RS don't come with any pre-programmed templates, always have to make them from scratch, would of been nice if it had ones for doing more swingy stuff on hand like the QYs do.

I should shut up now and let you get back to it.
<ZQS> [....<OII>.....soundcloud player v2.42.....................link]

adekoyote
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:33 pm
Gear: YAMAHA PSR460, ROLAND MC808, EDIROL, APC20, Emu Proteus 2500 and Yamaha RS7000, Yamaha Su700, Roland VP9000, Yamaha AW4416, Desktop Evolver
Band: The Ghostz of More

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by adekoyote » Sat Nov 19, 2011 12:25 am

With the RS7000 I am a happy camper. As for the preset phrases...I can live with them, especially because it is easy to "put" them into an editable state.

I still have not moved into pattern chaining or songs, but the sequence is solid with grace...it encourages you to listen to your sound and then to polish it in the mixer.

I still am getting my head around the jobs functions...but so far I can't keep my hands off of it. :evil:

adekoyote
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2011 9:33 pm
Gear: YAMAHA PSR460, ROLAND MC808, EDIROL, APC20, Emu Proteus 2500 and Yamaha RS7000, Yamaha Su700, Roland VP9000, Yamaha AW4416, Desktop Evolver
Band: The Ghostz of More

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by adekoyote » Sat Dec 10, 2011 1:33 am

The real time remix function on the RS7000 is amazing. It really works as happy accident system to develop breaks rolls and fills.

I am still getting used to the jobs functions.

I also struggle with the concept of why you would pattern chain and song modes while playing live....I guess the accessibility of the pattern mode just keeps me coming back.

the only thing is that you have to really take some time to name and organize the user phrases...but the realtime remix is the cat's meow, especially for basslines and percussion.

User avatar
balma
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2849
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2008 3:52 pm
Real name: Mauricio
Gear: DSI Tempest/Prophet 08/Roland V-Synth/Ensoniq Fizmo/E-mu MP7-XL7/Electribe ESX1/Radias/Waldorf MicroQ
Location: Costa Rica

Re: EMU MP7 vs RS7000

Post by balma » Sat Dec 10, 2011 10:00 pm

both are great instruments for live performance. One could be better than the other depending of how you are going to use it. I´ll focus more on the Emu since I know them better.

I think the RS7000 has a better interface. But the EMu command station, has indeed a deeper engine.

Advantages of the RS7000:

Detailed sampling.
Great effects section.
Great sequencing and control over the tracks playing.



Advantages of the command station:

Superb filter section. Maybe one of the best digital filter concepts ever made. 50 different Z plane filters.
Patchcords. Infinite resource for creating sounds.
Great sequencer.... awesome.
Great arppegiator.

RS7000 is a great sampler. Sampling allows you to access a bigger variety of sounds than the ones that you can create with the MP7.

But the RS7000 does not have the capabilities of synthesis that you will find on the Emu. The patchcord section is rocket science. You must dig it during a couple of years to really understand how far you can go with them. All the knobs are totally reprogrammable and the can control any amount of paramaters you can imagine. The Patchcord section will provide you with a infinite amount of possibilities to create all kind of sounds.

A Emu command station with 3 or 4 ROMs in the hands of a experienced user, can match most of the Virtual Analog synths on the market.


Now, the RS7000 is twice the price of the EMU. But if you really want to master the command station, you won´t be satisfied with one ROM. A Emu command station with 4 ROMS, could reach $800-1000.

I think the Proteus engine, is one the most amazing concepts on the digital domain, specifically on rompler synthesis. Almost no other rompler can reach their possibilities.


BTW, there are BIG differences on the O.S 1.17 and the 2.0 on the EMU. Be sure it has installed the 2.0 on it. The Remix function allows you to bring any track, from any pattern, and remix them into a new sequence. Knob movements can be used to input notes, etc...
His sex dungeons are rumored to hold hundreds of people in secret locations around the world.
https://soundcloud.com/balma

Post Reply