Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

A forum for discussing the pros & cons of buying a particular synth and for advice on buying synthesizers.
Racerhead
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:06 am
Contact:

Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by Racerhead » Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:33 am

Hello everyone,

I am a rank beginner and I am having problems with a few Q's that all my research hasn't been able to answer. If anyone could please read my rundown below and possibly help me not make a huge mistake on my first purchase I would be very grateful. Here goes:

Equipment owned: Really old electric guitar equipment from when I was a teen, Series A electric guitar, Boss HM-2 distortion pedal, flange pedal, and an amp that was really old when I got it back then, a B10 guitar amp. I'm not sure if I can use this with a synth?

I haven't touched any musical equipment for about 19 years now, and I've been doing research for about a month. I have learned an amazing amount of info but unfortunately the last questions I can't find answers for even with all the guides and forums I have read.

Music I am looking to create: Industrial, Darkwave, EBM, whatever categories it's all been sorted into. When I got into this style of music I was listening to Skinny Puppy, Front 242, FLA, etc. and it was just called Industrial. Now? There is quite a bit of fighting on some forums about what any of it is! Yikes..

New: I am pretty much looking at new, as the only way I could even afford a synth is to collect gift certificates/cash for Christmas as I am on a fixed income due to chronic illness. I have $650 Can. To spend, plus about $300 (I can go a bit higher if need be) on top of that from saving a bit. I did go into a couple of music stores but not knowing anything all I could do was press random buttons and make noise. The salespeople at these places are ok but you know how it goes. I asked one if the Juno-D would be good to make industrial music on and he said “yep”.

Used: I wouldn't mind buying used, but I have been looking every day for over a month at all the local used ads in my area, then branched out to areas in the same province, then pretty much everywhere in Canada. I haven't found anything other than upper end models that are out of my price range even used, and some vintage stuff that would be great later on but not for a rank beginner. For the reasons above and peace of mind new is probably my best option (plus having $300 in gift certificates to use).

Softsynths: They just don't do it for me, I'm a hands on person. The less time I spend in front of the computer the better. I know I will need to use them but the less I do the more fun I believe this will be. I spend way too much time staring at a computer screen each day as it is.

Unfortunately with all my research, downloading and reading manuals etc. I have become confused. I was looking at the SH-201 and the Korg R3 but then discovered multi-timbral synths. As I don't want to spend most of my time running one track at a time through the computer those are out, which is too bad because the R3 is better for industrial style music from what I have read.

So the point I am at is looking at the Roland Juno-D, the Yamaha MM6 and the Korg X50 (which is more $$ than the other two). I have read so many reviews and opinions on these units, and they seem to be hated more than anything else. Or sometimes absolutely adored. I like the X50 for the duel arpeggiators and the ability to split the keyboard. I have heard good and bad things for each model. If I go for the MM6 or the Juno-D I will have some extra cash to get other equipment I need. However the X50 even with the flaws people have complained about (keyboard and connectors on the back) seems like it is more versatile. Are these units really THAT bad? As far as a first and only keyboard for some time.

Ultimately it is sound I am after, since I can't program my own patches with these I will have to just modify the ones included. I know ROMplers are considered bad for industrial music but out of these three, can anyone tell me which one has the harsher sound to it that might be more suitable? Am I even on track here or completely out there as far as my information gathering is concerned? I'm looking to have some fun, get into something to take my mind off of what is going on and not get too frustrated in the process.

I hope I haven't confused anyone with this post more than I have confused myself. I know that this is a vintage synth forum, but out of all that I have been reading this one seems the friendliest towards new people and those asking possible dumb Q's like I may have. Thanks and take care!

Ayr

PS hopefully I won't be a few times poster, and can contribute something to this forum when I have something useful to contribute! Also I'm really sorry about the long post, I tried to trim it down but I wanted to post all the relevant info so there is less prompting me for info I didn't include.

User avatar
pflosi
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 3620
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2007 6:14 pm
Gear: more than 150 characters...
Location: zürich
Contact:

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by pflosi » Mon Dec 29, 2008 12:21 pm

stay away from romplers! if u want sth new, go for a virtual analog. or better, go for sth real analog.

User avatar
otto
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 1571
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 8:00 pm
Location: Utah

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by otto » Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:06 pm

$650-$950 budget isn't bad at all. A lot of the 80's and 90's industrial was done with samplers and various cheap synths such as the Ensoniq ESQ-1/SQ-80 which is very period industrial sounding to my ears. If you have $300 cash you should easily be able to pick up a nice ESQ-1 shipped off of ebay for that much. If it has to be new I would go for one or a combo of the following:
DSI Desktop Evolver + midi keyboard
Waldorf Blofeld + midi keyboard
Korg R3
Microkorg
Alesis Micron

It might help to know where you plan on buying from since you have to work with gift cards.

Your guitar effects should come in handy. You might even want to use some of the money to expand on effects or if you already have a computer you can use software effects for processing. You could use the amplifier to lo-fi the sound of you synth which I imagine is a good thing in industrial.
hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again

Racerhead
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:06 am
Contact:

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by Racerhead » Tue Dec 30, 2008 12:30 am

Thanks for the replies pflosi and otto,

Drats, I guess romplers really are that bad!, the biggest problem is there seems to be a huge lack of selection here in town. Most of what you can get is Korg, Roland and Yamaha. There are some other units such as the Nord's, Kurzweil's, Moog's, and Novation. The place I have the gift certificates from is Mothers Music, I'm not sure if they have locations outside of Canada. They have no on-line inventory, but this place does which gives you an idea of selection and price (Roland prices can't be displayed online in Canada, odd) http://www.axemusic.com/prodtype.asp?PT ... by=P_Name1

Mother's Music has lower prices so I went with them, they also have more selection in store. Axe music that the above link is to has lots online but not as much in-store. I don't think they carry Waldorf or DSI in town either.

I have been checking ebay.ca but not ebay.com as a lot of sellers won't ship to Canada, and the shipping costs can be as high as the item bought in some cases with the larger heavier units. However I do have a friend in the US who I get to bid on items a few times in the past and have sent to him, then he sends by USPS so I avoid high broker fees, etc. (If the synth falls into the USPS shipping limits for him to send up here). I have looked at ebay but have been a bit leery in case what I get has issues or develops them, plus the cost of shipping to Canada. That's another reason I was leaning towards new, but if new ends up useless for my needs then I have wasted money anyway. (Unless I go for the R3 or can get the Waldorf or DSI unit).

Thanks otto for some more names to look for, I have been dying to find a Juno-60 as they have been mentioned many times as a great synth but nothing so far. (I didn't check ebay.com) Are the units you mentioned easy enough to learn for a beginner with a fair amount of patience and a willingness to do research?

I really was interested in the Korg R3 but the fact that it is two-timbral made me wonder how much time I would have to use the computer to build more complex layers on. Maybe as a first synth it might be worth in anyway?

Thank you otto for letting me know I can use the effects pedals and amp,as well as the lo-fi through the amp info, with the synth. I was thinking they might only work with certain units. I have a laptop, it is three years old now but it is a pretty good computer. Asus G1 2.0 core 2 duo, 2 GB of ram, non-integrated 512mb Geforce GO 7700 video card (Which doesn't do much for my purposes, just for games)! and unfortunately a typical crappy integrated soundcard (If I buy used or a cheaper new synth I can buy an audio interface though).

Thanks for steering me towards the right direction you two, I will do some more research on the other models you suggested otto, and if you could answer a few more of my above dumbarse newbie Q's I would be even more grateful! Take care,

Ayr

User avatar
Johnny Lenin
Expert Member
Expert Member
Posts: 1054
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:56 pm
Gear: JX8P | AX60 | Little Phatty Stage II | DW8000 | Vox Jag | Fantom X6 | Juno-G | P-Bass | AS-120 | Double Jet

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by Johnny Lenin » Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:01 am

No. ROMplers are not that bad. They're just another type of synthesizer. When you need acoustic sounds [pianos, organs, guitars, etc.], and some digital-sounding stuff, then ROMplers are what you want. You cannot get a convincing piano on an analog or VA synth... and the straight samplers are rarely up to snuff for this.

The shortcoming of a ROMpler is that most have pretty minimal control and access for shaping sounds. On the other hand, ROMplers are great bread and butter synths for all kinds of applications.

Although it's fashionable to turn up one's nose at ROMplers, it's worth remembering: Select the tool to do the job. If a ROMpler is what you need, then get one. If it is not what you need, then don't.

User avatar
OriginalJambo
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2556
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 12:04 am
Gear: Check my sig
Location: Scotland, United Kingdom

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by OriginalJambo » Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:36 am

On that note I wouldn't really recommend the Juno-60 for industrial. :)

User avatar
Jabberwalky
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2151
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2005 6:03 pm
Gear: A hybrid of vintage and modern junk
Band: Variar
Location: Pgh, PA
Contact:

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by Jabberwalky » Tue Dec 30, 2008 3:46 am

There's absolutely no reason why the Juno60 couldn't do basses, leads and fx. It can easily do Front242 sounds and some Skinny Puppy sounds. SP used lofi, and gritty sampling keyboards, such as the Ensoniq Mirage.

Keep in mind, great industrial music has been written on the cheapest of the cheap.

User avatar
killedaway
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 1030
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 2:22 am
Gear: Electribes x 6
Revolution
Monomachine MKII
microKORG
CS01
& more!
Band: killedaway/allyourblood
Location: California, US

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by killedaway » Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:56 am

first and foremost, i recommend a sampler. you want to be able to drop in specific drum sounds as you need them, and a sampler is the way to go. you're gonna want some synth action in there, but it sounds like you're literally brand new to the whole thing, so you're gonna want something basic to start. get something complex up front, and you'll be ready to quit before you even get started. you need to be able to bang together your ideas quickly, while inspiration strikes. starting out simple will help you "get your footing", so to speak. from there, you can add to your setup, or change it entirely, upgrading to something more robust in the process.

some might balk at the simplicity of this, but i recommend a Korg ES-1 and EA-1. the ES-1 will cover your need for drums, short loops, FX and random samples (like from movies). the EA-1 is about as basic as it gets, but it's got two separate synths in it, and is capable of some HARD industrial sounds. i know, i use mine for industrial, exclusively. if you do go this way, i recommend the older MKI models, vs. the newer MKIIs, because they replaced the excellent Decimator effect with the far less versatile (in my opinion) Cross Mod.

what makes the Electribes such a great choice is that they each include inbuilt sequencers that are both easy to use, and incredibly fast, even for folks just starting out. you can come up with a bassline on the EA-1 in minutes, and quickly cobble together a drum sequence on the ES-1 just as fast. using MIDI, chain the two together, and you're on your way to your first track. doesn't get easier than that, but the results can still sound very professional. if you end up hating the combo, you can quickly sell the two for about the same you paid for them, and if you like them, it's ultra-easy to purchase more gear down the line, while keeping the Electribes fully integrated in your studio. they're reliable, inexpensive, and easy to use. the Electribes are also a nice way to dip your toe in the waters of subtractive synthesis and music production. they're simple enough that you can create your own sounds without having to rely on presets. when you understand just what goes into creating a sound you like on the EA-1, you'll probably be ready to dabble in something a little deeper (ie: the Korg R3, microKORG, Nord Lead series, etc). lastly, no computer required, beyond collecting and adjusting samples for the ES-1. everything you need to build songs between the two is right there.

i believe the EA-1 and ES-1 are both discontinued, so you'd have to buy them used, but Korg does still actively produce their newer siblings, the EMX, and ESX. these would suit your purposes as well, but they cost more, are more complex (though not much), and might make a better choice after getting to know the EA-1 and ES-1.

anyway, whether or not you decide to check those out, i still highly recommend you start with something basic and straightforward, to keep frustration to a minimum. the Roland SH-201 would make a decent secondary choice, as it is laid out simply and, for the most part, logically. of course, then you need to start looking into what type of sequencer you'll use, as most of the synths mentioned so far will only get you the sounds you want -- you'll still need some way to actually record them. whatever you get, be sure to select something with as much front panel control as possible: a synth with a knob for every (or almost every) feature will help you learn quickly and effectively, while a synth with few knobs and tons of menu-diving will likely end up gathering dust. for this reason, i'd stay away from the microKORG and Alesis micron (and similar trimmed-down models) as first-time picks.

good luck!
1.5.9.13
1.5.9.13

Racerhead
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:06 am
Contact:

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by Racerhead » Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:07 am

Thanks for the additional replies guys (gals)? I really appreciate everyone's feedback on this. I was worried about posting questions but it turned out it was the best thing to do.

In the end I think I will be wanting to make all my own sounds (Once I learn how) so I better stay away from a rompler for now.

I have been doing some research on the Blofeld, I found one used on Craigslist for $725 but in new condition right next door to Alberta in BC. I checked online to see what they are worth new, and found a store selling them for $600, on sale from $900, making it about $490 US for one of these brand new! They are in the same location in BC, with free shipping in Canada. They have retail stores as well as the online store and have been around since about 1999 it looks like so I think they are safe enough.

I didn't even think of these tabletop units as I thought having a keyboard separate from the synth would be a pita but from what I have read and the tiny size of these it's time to stop waffling and buy one. They look like what I am searching for, as they have been described as gritty and dirty sound wise.

They seem that they may not be the best for beginners, but not the worst. There isn't a lot of reviews on these yet, one said good for beginners, one said bad. I think starting with the basics and slowly working through it will be ok, it will definitely be a synth that will take a VERY long time for me to outgrow, if I ever even do! The sale is over on January 1st so unless I get a strong "NAY" this looks like a really good deal. Of course I will have to borrow someones credit card and write them a cheque. Then use the $300 in gift certificates to buy a midi keyboard and maybe something else depending on the cost of the keyboard.

Jabberwalky, you are so very right on great music being made on cheap instruments. It's more about talent to a certain degree, I know of some bands that use cheap equipment and sound great, I just can't think of them off the top of my head right now. As someone on another forum said, for industrial music put some forks in a blender and bash some trash can lids together. :lol:

Unless I get a strong "Don't get this"!! on the Blofeld I should order it tomorrow. Too bad the sale doesn't go on longer so I can go through more options. At least I caught it in time though which could be a very good thing.

Thank you all for your time and insight, if I don't get anymore feedback I will post about the Blofeld when it gets here. Take care!

Ayr

Racerhead
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:06 am
Contact:

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by Racerhead » Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:36 am

Opps, it looks like you posted your message killedaway while I was writing mine up.

Poop, now I'm not sure which way to go on this. Your info makes very good sense and you posted a lot of your experience and what a very new to synths person should do to avoid frustration. Yet I am unsure if I should pass up on the sale of this Blofeld?

From a quick search it appears that I can control the Electribes with a midi keyboard much like with the Blofeld?

I hate to be a pita here but I'm getting more confused (not a hard thing to happen at this point in time)! Plus it is 3:30 in the morning and my eyes are melting. I'm adding this to my post above as I missed the post from killedaway adding some very good food for thought to all this. I'm pretty much a deer caught in the headlights right now on which way I should go. Pass up on the Blofeld, or go for it and hope it isn't too much to handle?

Feel free to have urges to kill me... :oops:

Ayr

User avatar
xpander
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 1541
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2007 7:15 am
Gear: UltraProteus, Xpander, 200e, Minimoogs, Radias, Prophet VS, PolyEvolver, Arp 2600
Location: los gatos, california
Contact:

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by xpander » Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:42 am

otto wrote:... the Ensoniq ESQ-1/SQ-80 which is very period industrial sounding to my ears. If you have $300 cash you should easily be able to pick up a nice ESQ-1 shipped off of ebay for that much.
+1. the Ensoniqs were used heavily by Skinny Puppy and sound a great deal like the more expensive Prophet VS which is showcased on nin's Pretty Hate Machine. pick up the SQ80, a great-sounding triple oscillator bargain.

User avatar
otto
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 1571
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 8:00 pm
Location: Utah

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by otto » Tue Dec 30, 2008 7:41 pm

Poor Racerhead – I can see where this is going and the confusion it might create. Basically you have a myriad of options as there is no right or wrong gear to own. So your best option might be whatever is convenient and works within your monetary constraints. Sometimes you just have to jump right in and see what works for you.

I don’t really follow contemporary industrial but did listen to stuff like Skinny Puppy, NIN, F242, Ministry, and other late 80’s-mid 90’s period. There is a heavy use of sampling and you’ll need a drum machine unless you are handling that with software. I second the recommendation of the Electribe ES-1. It’s cheap ($150-$200 USD) but you have to buy it used as it is discontinued. You can use it as a drum machine and you can incorporate other samples.

I haven’t used a Blofeld but looking at the specs and listening to the demos it does sound like it would do industrial well. The downside is that it doesn’t have a lot of knobs so you will be menu diving which can be a complex and difficult way to learn synthesis. The evolver which would also be great for industrial has an interface that can be trying as well. However, it really depends on you and your willingness to learn. They both would be great for industrial but the learning curve will be steeper than some other options. The positive is that it would probably be great for the music you want to make, the negative is that it will take a while to wrap your head around and might make learning synthesis a little difficult.

As far as synthesizers that are available new, from the store, an SH-201 would probably be the easiest to learn on. The microkorg will take a little more time to wrap your head around but still isn’t too difficult. The general consensus as I’ve read on this forum is that the SH-201 doesn’t sound that hot but it does have its fans and does have a very user friendly interface. I think you’d be safe with a microkorg or a SH-201 as far as learning synthesis.

An ESQ-1 or SQ-80 can be had fairly cheap and usually aren’t that difficult to find. They are also regarded by many to be much underrated synths worth more than their monetary value. If you want that late 80’s industrial sound, they do it well. They have a lot of features; have an onboard sequencer, digital oscillators, analog filters and a straightforward, easy interface. The can also be had for less than $300 USD and sometimes you can find an ESQ-1 in the $150-$200 range. The Korg DW-8000 and Kawai K3 are also hybrid synths that will give you similar sounds.

Also, most synths can be used as midi controllers. So if you buy an ESQ-1, for example, and then buy a Blofeld you won’t need to also purchase a controller keyboard. Some decent synths can be picked up for as much or less than many of the midi controllers cost brand new.

To summarize and hopefully simplify this for you I think that you should consider getting 1 keyboard synth and 1 rhythm sampler. The blofeld would make a nice synth but the learning curve might be steep compared to an ESQ-1, SQ-80, Microkorg, SH-201, etc. Any of the synths mentioned would work for industrial. The ES-1 is a good choice for sampling and percussion. Any extra money you can could be put to use buying effects and such or you could hang onto it and see what you need after you’ve learned to use what you bought so far.
hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again

User avatar
killanator
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 419
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 7:03 am
Real name: Carl
Gear: Alesis Quadrasynth, Roland SH-201, Various MIDI things, Samson MediaONE 5a Active Studio Monitors
Band: Solo
Location: California

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by killanator » Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:01 pm

if you want to stay away from a computer, it would probably be best to start with something simple, like an electribe. which i further recommend. they are well in your price range, and can sample.

User avatar
OriginalJambo
Synth Explorer
Synth Explorer
Posts: 2556
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 12:04 am
Gear: Check my sig
Location: Scotland, United Kingdom

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by OriginalJambo » Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:40 pm

killedaway wrote:first and foremost, i recommend a sampler. you want to be able to drop in specific drum sounds as you need them, and a sampler is the way to go. you're gonna want some synth action in there, but it sounds like you're literally brand new to the whole thing, so you're gonna want something basic to start. get something complex up front, and you'll be ready to quit before you even get started. you need to be able to bang together your ideas quickly, while inspiration strikes. starting out simple will help you "get your footing", so to speak. from there, you can add to your setup, or change it entirely, upgrading to something more robust in the process.

some might balk at the simplicity of this, but i recommend a Korg ES-1 and EA-1. the ES-1 will cover your need for drums, short loops, FX and random samples (like from movies). the EA-1 is about as basic as it gets, but it's got two separate synths in it, and is capable of some HARD industrial sounds. i know, i use mine for industrial, exclusively. if you do go this way, i recommend the older MKI models, vs. the newer MKIIs, because they replaced the excellent Decimator effect with the far less versatile (in my opinion) Cross Mod.

what makes the Electribes such a great choice is that they each include inbuilt sequencers that are both easy to use, and incredibly fast, even for folks just starting out. you can come up with a bassline on the EA-1 in minutes, and quickly cobble together a drum sequence on the ES-1 just as fast. using MIDI, chain the two together, and you're on your way to your first track. doesn't get easier than that, but the results can still sound very professional. if you end up hating the combo, you can quickly sell the two for about the same you paid for them, and if you like them, it's ultra-easy to purchase more gear down the line, while keeping the Electribes fully integrated in your studio. they're reliable, inexpensive, and easy to use. the Electribes are also a nice way to dip your toe in the waters of subtractive synthesis and music production. they're simple enough that you can create your own sounds without having to rely on presets. when you understand just what goes into creating a sound you like on the EA-1, you'll probably be ready to dabble in something a little deeper (ie: the Korg R3, microKORG, Nord Lead series, etc). lastly, no computer required, beyond collecting and adjusting samples for the ES-1. everything you need to build songs between the two is right there.

i believe the EA-1 and ES-1 are both discontinued, so you'd have to buy them used, but Korg does still actively produce their newer siblings, the EMX, and ESX. these would suit your purposes as well, but they cost more, are more complex (though not much), and might make a better choice after getting to know the EA-1 and ES-1.

anyway, whether or not you decide to check those out, i still highly recommend you start with something basic and straightforward, to keep frustration to a minimum. the Roland SH-201 would make a decent secondary choice, as it is laid out simply and, for the most part, logically. of course, then you need to start looking into what type of sequencer you'll use, as most of the synths mentioned so far will only get you the sounds you want -- you'll still need some way to actually record them. whatever you get, be sure to select something with as much front panel control as possible: a synth with a knob for every (or almost every) feature will help you learn quickly and effectively, while a synth with few knobs and tons of menu-diving will likely end up gathering dust. for this reason, i'd stay away from the microKORG and Alesis micron (and similar trimmed-down models) as first-time picks.

good luck!
=D>

Racerhead
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:06 am
Contact:

Re: Questions on first synth, research done but still have Q's

Post by Racerhead » Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:02 am

Dang this is a great forum!!!

Thanks again for clarifying, the Blofeld does look daunting, the price was just too good. Sales happen more than once though.

I found an Electribe EA-1 for $250 obo, and the same seller has an ER-1 for $250 obo. I also found an ES-1 for $350 (All prices in Canadian dollars). It looks like the ES-1 is a better unit than the ER-1 as the ER-1 appears to be a drum machine only, even though I can get the ER-1 for $100 less than the ES-1. I still need to contact the sellers to make sure they still have the units. The ES-1 seems a little steep but I can always try making a fair offer. In any case both together would be $600 + shipping Canadian (Or a bit less with a fair offer to both parties). Even at that I can get both of these units used for the price of one of the newer replacements.

Or, get the ES-1 and then get an SH-201 with $300 of the gift certificate money going toward it then there is less cash out on top of the $350 I got for Christmas, and no need to buy a midi keyboard. Will this work or would it be better to just grab the ES-1, the EA-1 and a midi keyboard (Or an older synth, although finding them in Canada has been a chore and having something that heavy shipped across the border can be very costly). Oh Canada, so few people is ok in some ways, but not for when you need to buy goods, especially used!

Of course for $250 obo the EA-1 sounds like a good deal, I would just need to get something to control the two units with.

Thanks again for all the feedback, I posted on the right forum for good friendly advice! Take care,

Ayr

Thank you again as well Otto for summarizing it all so well, and for feeling sorry for my poor frazzled brain. :wink:

Post Reply