is Juno 106 my best choice here?

A forum for discussing the pros & cons of buying a particular synth and for advice on buying synthesizers.
Post Reply
zardoz677
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 105
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:30 am

is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by zardoz677 » Sun Oct 05, 2014 10:44 pm

So I am going to get as analog synth for the first time ever! I have decided this both because I want knobs to play with and to explore the world of wiring cables around, running it into different pedals and such, and to my ear I can hear a difference compared to soft synths... Anyways I want it especially for bass sounds however I want one that can do pads and leads as well, so I guess a polysynth is the main thing.

Could you tell me, does a synth being poly as opposed to mono have any effect on how good it is for bass sounds?

Also here are the type of sounds I want to be able to do:

saw disco/ punchy sounding basis like this:


(not the acid line but the low bass)


I also want to be able to do saw wave growl sounds


and pretty much all the sounds in the last song (deep pads, etc)


So anyways, is there an all around synth you guys could suggest? For some reason I keep thinking the juno 106.
any help would be very excellent as this is a big purchase for me (i don't want to spend over 1000)

User avatar
nuketifromorbit
Expert Member
Expert Member
Posts: 1344
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 4:07 am

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by nuketifromorbit » Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:29 pm

This should be in buyers guide, but a 106 is going to cost you close to a grand. For that amount of money you could probably pick up one of the new cheaper analog monos and a VA or hyprid poly. Also keep in mind the voice chips are prone to dieing.
We'll always be remembered, we'll always be dismembered.

User avatar
meatballfulton
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 5836
Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2005 9:29 pm
Gear: Logic Pro X

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by meatballfulton » Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:47 pm

You don't need a polysynth for leads or pads either, really. A monosynth with 2 or more oscillators can create simple chord sounds. What you need for pads are flexible envelopes and LFOs.

As nukeit mentioned Juno 6/60/106 prices have risen too high for your budget (they still sell for less than they did when they were new, though). You might get lucky with a 106 if you're patient.

There are other Rolands that are far cheaper used, but in general are not considered as good for punchy bass...Alpha Juno, JX3P/8P/10. The JX10 is pretty highly rated for pads. None of these are knobby synths, but you should check them out in VSE's gear pages. There's often a few of these for sale in the VSE for sale forum as well.

Already own a MIDI controller keyboard? Take a look at the DSI Tetra which can be used both as multiple monos or as a 4 voice polysynth. Has USB to integrate MIDI to your computer (but not audio).
I listened to Hatfield and the North at Rainbow. They were very wonderful and they made my heart a prisoner.

Virgule
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 370
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:46 pm

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by Virgule » Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:42 am

I've been impressed by the Roland JP-8000 for a while now. Loads of sound possibilities, they sound just as good or better than any Juno or JX and are cheaper than ever on the 2nd hand market.

You can look into the Novation Supernova and/or Nova module too.

zardoz677
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 105
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:30 am

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by zardoz677 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 4:16 am

Thanks folks! I don't want one without a keyboard or with assignable few knobs, as this will put me in a similar boat of just using the soft synths and parameters...

The Roland jp looks very intriguing. I must as with virtual analog, just what type of quality differences can I expect here? Will it still have those little imperfections and warmth of the sound? Will it basically just sound like a good soft synth ?

User avatar
corndogssg
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 217
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:38 am
Real name: ryan
Gear: v synth,little phatty2,jx10,kiwi106 jx305, jv2080x's8,k2600,ion,microQ,blofeld,evolver,tetra,x station,ultra nova,bass station2, jd990,minibrute
Band: sesame street gangsters
Location: olympia washington

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by corndogssg » Mon Oct 06, 2014 12:44 pm

the jp8000 is a well loved virtual analog roland synth. but it is "virtual analog" if you want a real analog u could get a juno 106 but as meatballfulton says, it's voice chips are prone to die out (I got one and had to replace 3 of the 6 within the first year of owning it)

as he suggested a roland jx3p or jx8p or jx10 are all "real analog" rolands, with great sounds too boot, a lot of people say that the jx3p sounds a lot like a juno 106 and it has 2 oscillators instead of 1 that is in a juno106.

check this out, the kiwi technics "patch editor" it was made to give knobs to bad a*s synths with pretty shitty interfaces, as in, not many knobs or sliders and a bunch of menu diving, which for awhile some synth designers thought would be a good idea for some reason??? :?:

http://kiwitechnics.com/patcheditor.htm

the cool thing is that if you got a jx3p which uses the pg 200 or jx8p (or jx10) wich use the pg 800 you can get the kiwi patch editor for about the same price and use it for not only 1 synth but a wide list of synths (which keeps growing) from many different synth manufactures. check it out!

the kiwi patch editor would set you back 500 bucks, and you can easily find a nice one of the roland jx synths for under 500. Go you tube the jx3p, jx8p and jx10 and see what one sounds best to your ears/needs, if you do end up getting a kiwi patch editor you will probably do what I did and buy a synth that is off of their list of synths that it works with. I fist got it to control my jx10, I have a little phatty, (all though I have never used it with the kiwi patch editor) I went and bought a waldorf micro Q which works beautifully with it and I just got a roland jd 990 off ebay which literally got to my house just a few hours ago! I can not wait to hook it up to my patch editor tomorrow and I will spend my day off on Tuesday synthing out like a cluck :shock:

so instead of getting a roland pg800 to control my jx10, I got a kiwi patch editor, and now i have it to control my jx10, my waldorf micro Q, my moog little phatty (if i wanted to) and my new roland jd990 now.

good luck man, my the synth be with you 8-)

User avatar
corndogssg
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 217
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:38 am
Real name: ryan
Gear: v synth,little phatty2,jx10,kiwi106 jx305, jv2080x's8,k2600,ion,microQ,blofeld,evolver,tetra,x station,ultra nova,bass station2, jd990,minibrute
Band: sesame street gangsters
Location: olympia washington

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by corndogssg » Mon Oct 06, 2014 1:24 pm

go to the "gear for sale" thread. "Z" has a roland jx8p for sale for 400 bucks, fyi

zardoz677
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 105
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:30 am

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by zardoz677 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 6:51 pm

Thanks again folks! I definitely want something with knobs and don't want to use any computer editor of possible .

How about an ms20 mini? Can that do the basses I listed at the beginning?

I could also run my dx7 into the filters right? Like aphex twin!!!

Jaytee
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu May 03, 2012 2:04 am

Re: is Juno 106 my best choice here?

Post by Jaytee » Sun Oct 12, 2014 3:32 pm

I don't know why people are steering you away from the Juno toward stuff that you explicitly said you didn't want. The JP8k is a digital synth (and notorious for having failing sliders) and the JX-8P has no knobs at all, everything is "pick a parameter, move the data slider, pick the next parameter, move the same data slider, etc" unless you get the PG programmer which can more than double the price (still under $1000 probably, to be fair, but more trouble to find).

It's rare that I see Juno 106s go for over $1000, even fully repaired ones. $800 is a decent price to pay for one with serviced voice chips, or maybe $700 without. And if you don't like it, sell it for what you paid, easy peasy.

The Juno will do everything you're asking of it. The only downside is that it tends to sound like a Juno; it doesn't have a crazy amount of sonic range, though you'll probably be plenty pleased with it as a first synth.

Post Reply