80s drum sounds. Drum machine or sampler?

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80s drum sounds. Drum machine or sampler?

Postby jantra » Sat Aug 20, 2016 4:20 pm

Hello
Im totally new to the synth world but im starting to gather up some gear.
Im into the 80s vibe and now i want a drum machine that will get me the 80s drum sounds.
(Yes buy a Linn and your ready to go, but im not gonna spend that kind of money :lol: )

First off, i have been reading about drum machines and i`ve found out that these will most likely make me happy. Roland dmx, Kawai R-100 , Yamaha RX11, RX15, Roland R5, alesis HR16 etc.
Theres a Roland R-5 and a KORG DDD-1 for sale not too far away from me with a good price.

But when i was reading on another forum there was a guy saying; "Just get an old korg es1 or something like that, and fill it with samples from the 80s drum machines you like. That's exactly what I do. No need for clunky, slow interfaces these days"

That guy got me to think a little LOL :)

I`ve been looking at the Akai mpc 1000 & 2000, Korg es1 and the Elektron Machinedrum SPS-1 mk II.
(Theres an electron Machinedrum SPS-1 mk II for sale here. Price is $ 640.00)
Would this be a good setup if i could find some high quality samples of the Linndrum for example?
These new machines might be a bit more "powerful" and have more options than the old stuff i mentioned up there?

So what im askin is should i go the old way or the new way?
IF i lost interest in the 80s sound, i could delete the samples and add any other drums sounds to the sampler. Thats what i like.

I must admit that i lean towards a "new" sampling drum machine (even thought having a old machine looks cool lol).
If you agree, would the MPC, korg es1 or the machinedrum serve me well?
I`ve read about the Machinedrum and it looks like its quite complex? I hope it doesnt have so much "power" that a new beginner like me would be totally lost. Do any of you know if its hard to learn? The $640.00 machinedrum that is for sale here looks good.

Any other samplers i should look into?
(This will be my FIRST drum machine)
(not willing to spend more than $700)

Oh boy. This text got a little long, sorry. Tell me what you think :idea: :)
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Re: 80s drum sounds. Drum machine or sampler?

Postby ninja6485 » Sat Aug 20, 2016 6:47 pm

Start with something simple (a sampler) and drum machine samples. Even the volca sample could work, or an electribe, etc. Mpc's are always great. Or, why not just use drum samples directly in your Daw at first?

This gives you a solid foundation from which to build, and will give you usable, high quality drum sounds in the style you want.

If you find there are certain drum samples you gravitate towards more than others (RX5, tr 707, etc.) Than you might want to look into buying the machine. There will be 0 redundancy, since your sampler can take on all sorts of other tasks, accompanying rhythms, etc that compliment your drum machine should you decide to upgrade later.

People sometimes forget that drum machines are instruments. It's not just about extracting the sounds they make into a daw. You play them, and make inspiring music. Sometimes this is pure programing, sometimes this is knob twiddling and button push jamming, and sometimes this means hooking up the individual outs to fx and jamming in a mixer, and everything in between. A key question is, do you think it would be fun to play the drum machine? This is possibly the most important thing to consider.

Different machines also play differently. My 808 is so much different than my Drumtrax. When all I had was the samples, it seemed like it was just a case of two machines with different sounds. I had no idea what I was missing until I got them. Drum samples tend to homogenize everything. If you find yourself looking to add more texture, more of the machine's character, or perhaps more contrast with some other track elements to your drum sounds, you might want to think about getting a drum machine.
This looks like a psychotropic reaction. No wonder it's so popular...
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Re: 80s drum sounds. Drum machine or sampler?

Postby jantra » Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:34 pm

ninja6485 wrote:Start with something simple (a sampler) and drum machine samples. Even the volca sample could work, or an electribe, etc. Mpc's are always great. Or, why not just use drum samples directly in your Daw at first?

This gives you a solid foundation from which to build, and will give you usable, high quality drum sounds in the style you want.

If you find there are certain drum samples you gravitate towards more than others (RX5, tr 707, etc.) Than you might want to look into buying the machine. There will be 0 redundancy, since your sampler can take on all sorts of other tasks, accompanying rhythms, etc that compliment your drum machine should you decide to upgrade later.

People sometimes forget that drum machines are instruments. It's not just about extracting the sounds they make into a daw. You play them, and make inspiring music. Sometimes this is pure programing, sometimes this is knob twiddling and button push jamming, and sometimes this means hooking up the individual outs to fx and jamming in a mixer, and everything in between. A key question is, do you think it would be fun to play the drum machine? This is possibly the most important thing to consider.

Different machines also play differently. My 808 is so much different than my Drumtrax. When all I had was the samples, it seemed like it was just a case of two machines with different sounds. I had no idea what I was missing until I got them. Drum samples tend to homogenize everything. If you find yourself looking to add more texture, more of the machine's character, or perhaps more contrast with some other track elements to your drum sounds, you might want to think about getting a drum machine.


Thanks for the awesome answer Ninja6485! And sorry for my slow reply.

I`ve been watching alot of videos on youtube and i think i will like to play a drum machine. Infact, i cant wait to try one! Thats why i bought myself a very little used AKAI MPD26 yesterday.

So now i need to try to find some high quality samples of 80s drum machines :)

Does anyone know if these sounds are good and high quality? --> http://samples.kb6.de/downloads.php
If not i might buy this collection: http://www.uvi.net/en/drums-percussion/ ... ology.html
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Re: 80s drum sounds. Drum machine or sampler?

Postby Cosmic Key » Tue Oct 18, 2016 7:43 pm

As a newbie to this world, I can relate to that question too.

After quite a few months using a lot of different drum samples in a DAW, I gave the Roland TR-505 a try, and I must admit that this little drum machine surprised me a lot. I got into programming and creating my own patterns, and taking into account that using samples in a DAW for sketching could be a lot quicker, using a real instrument seems to be quite natural and comfortable, at least for me. Some weeks later, I got myself a Korg Rhythm-55 preset machine, synced them both and started using them together. The result was nice enough for me to convince me that I didn't need anything else... until I started to layer both the TR-505 and the KR-55 with some LinnDrum LM-1, E-Mu Drumulator and Oberheim DMX samples, and that made me understand that both worlds can be really helpful.

And after this somehow nonsensical explanation, my advice to you is to use both real machines and samples at the same time. The samples may be triggered with some sort of controller or played in a sequencer. But I highly recommend you to use hardware and avoid computers if you're going live.

By the way, UVI Beatbox Anthology seems really nice. I have never tested it but I own a license for Digital Synsations and the things I can get out of it are amazing, in my humble sight. So I think Beatbox Anthology could help you a lot in your way. Best of luck finding the most fitting machines.

I hope I have thrown some light and help you in a way.
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Re: 80s drum sounds. Drum machine or sampler?

Postby ian » Mon Oct 31, 2016 3:56 am

ninja6485 wrote:Start with something simple (a sampler) and drum machine samples. Even the volca sample could work, or an electribe, etc. Mpc's are always great. Or, why not just use drum samples directly in your Daw at first?

This gives you a solid foundation from which to build, and will give you usable, high quality drum sounds in the style you want.

If you find there are certain drum samples you gravitate towards more than others (RX5, tr 707, etc.) Than you might want to look into buying the machine. There will be 0 redundancy, since your sampler can take on all sorts of other tasks, accompanying rhythms, etc that compliment your drum machine should you decide to upgrade later.

People sometimes forget that drum machines are instruments. It's not just about extracting the sounds they make into a daw. You play them, and make inspiring music. Sometimes this is pure programing, sometimes this is knob twiddling and button push jamming, and sometimes this means hooking up the individual outs to fx and jamming in a mixer, and everything in between. A key question is, do you think it would be fun to play the drum machine? This is possibly the most important thing to consider.

Different machines also play differently. My 808 is so much different than my Drumtrax. When all I had was the samples, it seemed like it was just a case of two machines with different sounds. I had no idea what I was missing until I got them. Drum samples tend to homogenize everything. If you find yourself looking to add more texture, more of the machine's character, or perhaps more contrast with some other track elements to your drum sounds, you might want to think about getting a drum machine.


This is an excellently well made point.
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