Is it just me or are there others who HATE software..

For computer based music makers. Discussions about plug-ins and stand alone computer synth gear.

Software or Hardware for recording and instruments

Like Hardware ?
43
61%
Like Software ?
28
39%
 
Total votes: 71

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Post by philbar » Sun Sep 11, 2005 11:05 am

i use cubase a lot but have to agree with a lot of the comments. it seems tactile usable hardwae interfaces are definitely the way to go. having said that i use the ms20 usbinterface with the legacy collection a lot ( purely for the ms20 bit of that software).

having said that there are some truly great bits of software out there.... the arturia stuff, minimogue, sun ra etc.

its all good but i do like me hardware...

Access Virus Ti Polar + Ableton Live

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Post by Cruel Hoax » Sun Sep 18, 2005 5:26 am

Software is totally repeatable! Recallable! Presets are so much easier to make! Software is mouse-click-easy!

Also:

Software is for pussies!

Hey, if you're satisfied with mediocre sound at the expense of Real f**k Knobs and tone, you go with that.

Real men use real hardware. Real women too, in deference to october71 and (maybe) Libby.

h**l, virtual sex has its place, but nobody mistakes it for dirty sweaty smelly animal lovin'!

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Post by futureworlder » Sun Sep 18, 2005 7:05 am

Hoax, man, you're too much... :P

i've gone through so many phases, falling in and out of love with sounds, gear, and hunting down, trying out, and then getting rid of all kinds of synths, sequencers, samplers, stompboxes, sync boxes, etc. etc. for me, it all began with a Yamaha RX-7, DX-27, Poly-61 and an Alesis MMT-8.

had a mate who turned me on to tracking- still, no replacement for h/w, but it was fun, and easy and made life a little more enjoyable. went through Hammerhead, Rubber Duck, tons of freeware. We recorded everything on a Yamaha 8-track deck, bounced down drum tracks, double-tracked basslines, etc. then my bandmates came up with a copy of ReBirth 388. Heaven, it was. since we were in a band, and DJ'ed out regularly as well, i bought an Akai-S20 and used an app called Akai Disk to port samples and loops we made in ReBirth and Fruity Loops/Hammerhead, etc. onto floppies, which we would load into the S-20 and trigger live during performances. The S-20 was just a phrase sampler, but it had 16 pads, much like a drum machine, and a realtime-only s**t sequencer, so you had to be dead-on with your recording. Sequences were done in Cubase, then MIDI-dumped into MMT-8, which, was nerve-wracking, espec. when the battery died. This went on for some time, and my synth arsenal/ live rig started to weigh in at around an estimated 350 lbs.
My Juno60 alone, with it's Calzone case, weighed around 70 lbs. My Ampeg VT-22 combo amp, 125 lbs. no wonder i had back problems...

Not to mention the setup time, i was always the first up onstage, and the last to finish setting up and soundchecks were always a b***h, even after doing things like rackmounting EVERYTHING that was rackable or small enough to do so, and mounting powerstrips in the back of the rack cases, with all leads attached, and all cables routed through a patchbay and into the mixer, and a DI box connected to the mixer's outs. but no matter how streamlined i got my rig, even leaving stuff at the studio for certain shows, sampling more, etc. it was still a giant b***h to get everything in/out and onstage. we started playing more & more shows, and it just got to be too much. TR-X0X, 303, SK's, CS's, MS-10, SH101, JX8P, EPS, SH09, Sirius, Nord, etc. all came and went, looking for the perfect sound/ setup...

Then Reason came out. It was totally amazing, and could run on a laptop, as well, with a little midiman midi out box. This started showing up more & more in our tracks, and i quickly mastered it. Granted, the synths weren't as fat as the Juno, but they were a h**l of a lot more portable. So we started doing mostly Reason-based shows, playing in NYC and Brooklyn, and developing more of a following- more distance meant more space, we got a van and started doing that...

Years later, after going through the whole ordeal, Cubase, Cubase VST, VST 5, etc. i discovered Ableton Live and ordered one of the first copies to hit the U.S.- it was incredible, worked with Reason via ReWire, and supported ASIO, so there was little to no latency.

Nowadays, my rig is almost entirely portable, and i can fit most of my gear into a UDG roller record bag, so no more 350 lb. hernia-inducing pile of analogs just to do an hour's performance. My iBook is perfect for playing out and handles Live, Reason and a few, maybe 2-3 VST's, but the real majority of work is done by my hardware, MACHINEDRUM is always the master for the rig- H/W midi clock is rock-solid and a h**l of a lot more reliable than Software, no matter how stable the processor. but if i had to, say, the iBook crashed, something horrible happened, etc. i could just do an entire performance with H/W and not miss a single beat, literally.

Even with higher clock speeds on processors, RAM, backplanes, busses and caches, software is still extremely volatile and nothing is more depressing than seeing a show, and someone can't perform because their laptop crashed/ died. it's a bad idea to trust your show to a computer, and it's alot more entertaining to see someone working a synth, or rocking a mixer than watching some wanker behind a laptop fiddling with a mouse, and not connecting at all with the audience.

Live has been a godsend for recording, sampling, mixing, sequencing and arranging, and i keep my hardware to the bare minimum for many reasons, but i can get away with using the same synth i.e. Evolver, several times on the same track, build a loop library, create scenes to trigger, and still have MIDI tracks playing analog H/W at the same time. i don't think i could ever go back to recording on a tape deck, it's just too limiting. Live has completely changed my entire workflow and recording process for the better. It also makes long-distance collaboration a snap, which is very important these days, especially for remix work.
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Post by stalla » Sun Sep 18, 2005 9:23 am

I like it hard :-)
In a synthetic mood

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why one or the other?

Post by justinjbrown » Thu Sep 22, 2005 8:44 am

Where does it say you have to chose one as the best? Having just skimmed this thread I am wondering if anyone mentioned that almost all new synths are digital, running software. Whats the real difference between that and a softsynth? A faster computer attached to it?

Realistically, when it comes down to it the sound differences are negligible. True, a huge a*s modular analog is going to sound like a huge a*s analog, and a digital is going to sound tinny by comparison...but you can tweak things all sorts of ways with software...it's like having 20 hands on 20 knobs instead of just 2....automation is a wonderfull thing...

Furthermore, hardware is expensive as f**k...it's one thing to keep a few pieces of analog around, or a few cool drum machines, it's another to run yourself into the ground financially because you want to make phat beats, or be more experimental than the next guy.

Seriously, how many of you here have had to argue with your spouse or significant other over money due to gear purchases? (my hand is raised)

Creativity isn't defined by being all hardware, or all software or even a little of both...

peace

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Post by Jabberwalky » Thu Sep 22, 2005 2:26 pm

Hmm. Never heard that before....

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meatballfulton
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Re: why one or the other?

Post by meatballfulton » Fri Sep 23, 2005 2:47 pm

justinjbrown wrote:hardware is expensive as f**k...it's one thing to keep a few pieces of analog around, or a few cool drum machines, it's another to run yourself into the ground financially because you want to make phat beats, or be more experimental than the next guy.
I dunno, when you add in the cost of the COMPUTER softsynths aint all that cheap.

I bought Reason but have spent almost no time with it, played the demos (nice) toyed around with editing it....yuck! Yes, it's cool that the display LOOKS like real hardware (I dig the cables flopping around when you plug them into the rear) but tweaking knobs with the mouse sucks. I'm not sure this is any improvement over the text based interfaces of old-school patch editors! I see it as another months-long project LEARNING how to use the damn software rather than making music :roll:

The #1 thing computers are good for is visual editing...trimming and looping samples, drawing controller curves, tweaking arrangements in a piano roll, etc. #2 is data storage (librarians, etc.).

For everything else I find I still prefer the interface of hardware, I can get MOST things done faster.

BTW not all hardware is expensive, my analog modular only cost $450 brand new. the DSI Evolver is a totally insane piece of gear for $500, etc.

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Post by justinjbrown » Fri Sep 23, 2005 5:18 pm

I dunno, when you add in the cost of the COMPUTER softsynths aint all that cheap.

I bought Reason but have spent almost no time with it, played the demos (nice) toyed around with editing it....yuck! Yes, it's cool that the display LOOKS like real hardware (I dig the cables flopping around when you plug them into the rear) but tweaking knobs with the mouse sucks. I'm not sure this is any improvement over the text based interfaces of old-school patch editors! I see it as another months-long project LEARNING how to use the damn software rather than making music

The #1 thing computers are good for is visual editing...trimming and looping samples, drawing controller curves, tweaking arrangements in a piano roll, etc. #2 is data storage (librarians, etc.).

For everything else I find I still prefer the interface of hardware, I can get MOST things done faster.

BTW not all hardware is expensive, my analog modular only cost $450 brand new. the DSI Evolver is a totally insane piece of gear for $500, etc.

There are good points either way, of course taking advantage of a deal is the way to go especially if you are working with hardware.

However, consider this. A person on a limited budget could purchase a decent computer from an ebay store for 400 or less, could buy reason for 350, could get one copy of Recycle for 200 and then spend another 50 on a cheap piece of tracking software, finally adding in 100 for a cheap midi controller......and basically be pretty entertained for a long time.

So lets see....400+350+200+100+50=1100

Considering that fact that reason doesn't sound to bad, and that it allows you hardware style control with the option to have as much of the supplied hardware as your computer can handle I would have to say software certainly has it's advantages over hardware.

Lets say you really need to make music but you can't afford all the extra's you could get the same 400 dollar computer, and just reason for 750.

and what if you already have an ok computer? you could dish out just 350 and just get reason.

Reason has it's limits though...but...

Imagine having a really superb computer with the ability to run multiple modular programs at once....

An example would be using Live, hosting reason, reaktor, absynth, VST's, and whatever other standalones you want, with samples, loops, realtime audio, plus what comes with live...fx, instruments...etc

You can also sync up and integrate hardware into the mix as well.

See where I am going?

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Post by VCO » Sat Sep 24, 2005 1:08 am

Tough call, since I've never really experienced completely hardware before. I've tried to go completely hardware, but couldn't afford it all and only had a few synths and such and eventually I got sick of all these cables all over the room, synthesizers taking alot of space and taking a long time to recall a previous recording. I want to create music fast and easy, not messing around with making backups of hardware synthesizers' memory (if they have any memory at all?), being limited with polyphony and such. I'd like to go completely hardware, but it has to be alot of it to satisfy me. Just a few synthesizers and effect units won't satisfy my need. I began "the other way around". I started off using software (budget reasons), then tried out some hardware, so maybe I'm just used to doing it the software way. Anyway, I think the ouput of it all is exactly what I want it to be, so I'm satisfied with what I have right now even though I'm not very creative at the moment.
AND software is almost the only way I can get away, because I'm on a very limited budget. That's why I build most of my softsynths myself.

I love working with hardware synths since they're hands-on and all, but recalling and such is a pain in the butt.

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Post by crystalmsc » Tue Jul 18, 2006 6:28 pm

With Current Technology: SOFTWARE!
The future is very bright..
Kaossilatron - Voicillator
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Station: Ableton Live 10 Suite, Obscurium, Push 2, Ultranova, MS-20m, Wavedrums

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Post by ewik » Tue Jul 18, 2006 6:56 pm

dear god, if i was to do with hardware what i do with software, i can't even begin to imagine how many resources i'd be out of. space, time, money, more time... the only time i question my software is when i ask too much from it and the computer gets slow, but that's when i remember i'm 15, jobless, in school. with software, i've got it good. i could use some real knobs though, but hey, money...

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Post by JSRockit » Tue Jul 18, 2006 7:15 pm

I record to software...and HD.
Korg Volcas / 6 x TE POs / MicroBrute / EH Space Drum & Crash Pad

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Post by pinkclouds » Tue Jul 18, 2006 7:19 pm

I used to be all hardware but turned exclusively to software–a decision I still regret. I'm going to back to tracking on a Portastudio and sequencing on a hardware box (or maybe I'll just limit myself to one drum machine in Reaktor and treat Logic as a Portastudio). Of course, now that I've been exposed to software, I'll import my tracks into Logic to mix and store. I don't miss master tapes. It's nice to fit all your tracks onto a DVD and not worry about tape ending up as spaghetti on the floor.

Creating music in software didn't work for me. It became too cerebral–what can I automate, how can I process this audio further, let's open this plug-in. I also don't like the sound of music composed entirely on softsynths... most of it lacks character. Limits are good for me.

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...

Post by elmosexwhistle » Tue Jul 18, 2006 10:33 pm

i like software, you can get some great free stuff :) if you have a decent midi controller you can control the paramaters with real knobs (because mouse clicking does suck!) between free vst's, and free soundfont libraries all off the internet, i've got many of the sounds i need :)

although hardware is fantastic too, i love the limitations of hardware and how it makes you work in a different way.

overall, the sound? well, i want a real analogue for real oscs and filters, and i love my an1x, but software sounds pretty good aswell if you rub it up the right way, i would advise having some good hardware synths, and then get a load of free vsts aswell to give you the best of both worlds...x

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Re:

Post by Voodoo Ray » Sun Mar 10, 2013 11:28 am

PitchBender wrote:i love quality lo-fi.
Me too.

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