Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

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Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by Joey » Sat Mar 20, 2010 11:48 pm

So heres an interesting one...

what does everyone use for their drum sounds in terms of software drum synthesizers (not samplers... i.e. ultrabeat, waldorf attack, microtonic, etc...)

I mainly work with samples (battery), but have borrowed a friends machinedrum and its slightly blowing my mind, i'm wondering if there is a software alternative that can basically replace it for cheaper

thoughts?
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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by griffin avid » Sun Mar 21, 2010 10:24 am

Tough one. every drum machine I can think of uses samples somewhere in the engine. Hmph. I always thought microtonic was 100% synthetic. The only thing that comes to mind off the head is Drumatic 3. It was featured in PE Mag. e-phonic Drumatic Issue 03 (page 78). http://www.e-phonic.com/plugins/drumatic3.php

Fot the individual sounds, I think a lot of options exist. There are tons of Snare and Kick-making VSTs. Mostly I fnd the kicks are done well, but the snares always sound like thinly-sliced-techno-pop-cheese. Hey, some people are after that sound so...

For Kicks, this looks interesting http://www.vengeance-sound.de/
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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by D-Collector » Sun Mar 21, 2010 12:19 pm

Drumatic 3 is excellent, so are all of e-phonic's VSTs. I use it a lot!

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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by th0mas » Sun Mar 21, 2010 4:29 pm

I don't think he's worried about it being 100% synthesized as much as he's looking for an experience in software close to that of a machinedrum? I'm interested too. I mostly use Battery -> a touch of glitch although I have waldorf attack LE and it's nice.

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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by griffin avid » Sun Mar 21, 2010 6:15 pm

It's a pretty open ended quest for opinions. You don't say EXACTLY what slightly-blew your-mind.
Is that even possible?

The sound?
The sound-sculpting options?
The workflow?
The Sequencer?

I'd assume that it was the sound sculpting capabilities since you said no samples.
I suggest you sell something, ask for your birthday present early, be extra nice to your girlfriend, beg your parents for $$$, work overtime etc and buy the box. Reason being that you sound INSPIRED by the machinedrum. There is no substitute for the thing you want. A ton of software won't stop that longing- even if you find a BETTER alternative with more sound shaping options. You want what you want.

Save up and buy one. You'll use something in its place for a while and still want one and STILL buy one eventually. You know deep down you will. It's inevitable.

Half the charm is the fact that it is exactly what it is.
No substitutes accepted.
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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by diezdiazgiant » Sun Mar 21, 2010 7:46 pm

the only soft synth I've used so far that's been able to be as quick and immediate as I would like for drum synth programming is rob papens albino 3.
With waldorfs attack there are so many goddamn parameters to map it makes it really unwieldy to use with a midi controller.
What I do with albino is pretty simple: albino is 4 part multitimbral so start off with a basic template patch, I set up each timbre to basically emulate the signal path of a vermona perfourmer, and then I make a control template in my remote sl (templates can scroll across pages of controls so with my albino drum template I make each page representitive of each timbre).
For added control you can assign 4 buttons on the remote sl within that template to go straight to each timbres control.
Albino sounds great and using it in this manner produces an excellent work flow, and being semi modular you can make it as simple or complex as needed
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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by mao » Mon Mar 22, 2010 10:51 am

I used Waldord and Microtonic... but a friend let me play his MachineDrum... and something changed in my mind.

If you want something that let you create in few seconds awesome drum pattern... well nothing beat the MachineDrum. It's not only a matter of sounds (the machindrum is an awesome drum synthesizers) but is the sequencer that is amazing easy and creative. Everything is in your finger, ready to go... it's far far far better than sitting in front of your pc.

I bought the MachineDrum and then I was so amazed than I boought the Monomachine. I can really do everything I need without starting my daw. Monomachine+Machindrum+NordLead2x(for chords & pads)...and well... Is all i need. The monomachine great sequencer can handle six internal track and six external midi track. I'm not kidding the monomachine sequencer is by far the best I ever tried... very creative instruments.

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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by griffin avid » Mon Mar 22, 2010 11:09 am

Awesome. What does it offer sequencer-wise, creatively, besides the Step and Realtime recording?
Or is it the way you can manipulate the patterns/sequences after you've recorded them?
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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by Joey » Mon Mar 22, 2010 4:16 pm

yeah i think im just going to have to get the machinedrum. legitimately.
No one cares, no one sympathizes,
so you just stay home and play synthesizers.

http://wearereplicants.com

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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by krushing » Tue Mar 23, 2010 9:34 am

griffin avid wrote:Awesome. What does it offer sequencer-wise, creatively, besides the Step and Realtime recording?
Or is it the way you can manipulate the patterns/sequences after you've recorded them?
I guess the "parameter lock" is one of the biggies - you can change up pretty much everything for each sequencer step.

Software-wise, I'd probably take a look at AudioRealism's ADM and Audio Damage's Tattoo. Both feature similar systems...

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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by griffin avid » Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:46 am

Unedited article:
Audio Damage tattoo
Drum synth and sequencer
$70.00 USD AU/VST Available as a direct download.
Words by Griffin Avid

Audio Advantage

I’ve always counted on Audio Damage to deliver quality effects at more than fair prices. They’ve done a great job of modeling vintage effect plus with a little bit of the damage thrown in for uniqueness. When I heard Audio Damage was going to add a drum machine to its arsenal, I knew the results would be interesting. Their loop-mangling plug Replicant (yes, inspired by the classic Blade Runner [check the names of the presets for more nerdjoy-DS]) already scrambled beats beyond recognition and used a truly inspiring circular interface. And it has enough randomization built in to remove even the deepest case of basic-beat-boredom.

Audio Implanted

They tell us that tattoo is inspired by the XOX (808/909) series of drum machines so you know what kind of sonic territory we’re rushing into. Great as those sounds may be, producers who want authentic emulations of these boxes are usually stuck with a 16 step sequencer interface to get busy with. Tattoo uses a 32 step grid and adds a very nice Mod Sequencer for adding moving/evolving changes in your tone. The tonal sculpting tools extend farther than the original analog boxes giving you more variety in sound than expected. The included drum kits are very usable and lean more towards the electronic side as opposed to old-vintage-sampled hits. Both the preset kits and included patterns are squarely aimed at dance music producers, but there is room to adopt this baby and raise it as a child of hip hop. The simple grid structure, modulation sequencing engine and the extensive randomization controls are the creative highlights of this product and make it a fine addition to any beatsmith’s arsenal. Be that as it may, there are a few minor niggles that you may want to consider.

Audio Ranted

As a VST compatible at VST 2.4 you may experience problems with older hosts. I would have loved a standalone version and backwards compatibility. Although tattoo accepts MIDI in for automation and can send MIDI out to control other sound modules (woo-hoo), it doesn’t record note data in real time so no, you won’t be using your drum pads to break free of the grid programming. Aw-shucks. The 47 preset kits stay pretty close to the realm of yes-I-can-use-this-today and thankfully, very few are thrown in to show off the D-Plane Synthesis engine. They certainly let you warp the sounds to your hearts’ content, but I would love to be able to load individual drum sounds and even swap different drum pattern parts for another creative kit and pattern building option. Tattoo is powered by true synthesis and the sounds are all generated in realtime, but still very light on your CPU.

Audio Enchanted

For the producer who likes to build drum tracks by programming steps and relishes the sound of classic analogue boxes driven by the electronic realm; tattoo is a product worthy of consideration. The sounds are solid and presented in an intuitive interface with enough sound shaping options to make your drum work stand out. What’s lost in the rigid step approach is made up with the TR-909 swing and a plethora of randomization options that even includes a probability slider for adding or subtracting drum hits. While some companies attempt to throw everything along with the kitchen sink into a product, Audio Damage have focused on the simple joy or getting a beat going and seeing what happens after that. You can hear the sounds of tattoo, and watch tutorial videos at AudioDamage.com.
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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by Stab Frenzy » Tue Mar 23, 2010 1:02 pm

krushing wrote:I guess the "parameter lock" is one of the biggies - you can change up pretty much everything for each sequencer step.
The E-Mu Command Stations (XL-7 etc) do this as well, they're amazing and very underrated sequencers.

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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by mao » Fri Mar 26, 2010 9:19 am

The machinedrum has realtime and xox type sequencing. The monomachine adds step sequencing too.

The parameter lock is insane... wonderful.. in the monomachine you can change (even during realtime recording) the waveform of an osc and the sequencer record the changes... like a wavetable synth :o

Then you need to read carefully the manual and visit the electron-user forum to learn the tricks that makes the difference. The strange thing about elektron machines is that they seems really "easy" then... you understand that you are over an iceberg... you do everything in the top but you can dig the thing down to the bones and be amazed. There are a lot of functions and key combination to do useful things. Just learn.

For example... in the monomachine you create a pattern with a bassline, some chords (with the ensemble machine) a drum track and a lead... well when you switch to the song mode you can set to play that pattern 2 times for example then you set to play again the same pattern but transposing only the bassline and muting the lead and chords... then another go with the SAME pattern with the bassline+chords+leads tracks transposed each in a different way... I mean you haven'to create all separate transposed patterns to do the job... one is sufficient. Isn't this a great thing ? Well the elecron machines have tons of these useful functions.

PAY ATTENTION: If you're planning to buy a MachineDrum or Monomachine...well... be sure to buy the new "+" version. The new MD and MNM have the expansion "+drive" by default at the same price... so it's a big advantage. The upgrade for the "old" MD (or MNM) is 360 euros :twisted: so... be sure to get the new one.

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Re: Software Drum Synthesizers vs machinedrum

Post by MitchK1989 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:34 am

The new audio damage drum machine is probably the closest with it's sequencer options doing basically parameter locks and using synthesis for its sounds, but its nowhere near as complex and not aiming for the same type of sound.

Then again, it's also less than $100.

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