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good synth gods hear my cry!

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:23 am
by raradestrier
im about to tear my hair out.
so im the ridiculous newb. i dont care. im done checking all this out by myself. i must have looked at every make and model with in my price range in existance.

ive got up to 300 bucks. not including shiping, but probably like under 20.
i need something versita(sp?) something i can use to gain experience as well as produce decent hip hop, and electric music on. something i can use for a long, long, LONG, time.

i have a major preference twoards analog, and yes vintage is no problam. i dont have the greatest cashflow so maintinence should be low. i need something that has a wide range of sounds and effects.

hopefully its not too hard to operate as i am deffinatly not the most experienced person, but its gotta be soemthing i cna learn on.

also a link to some major begginers guide to synths would be nice.

yes im a hassle, but in fifteen years when im famous it'll be worth it.
and yes i was a joking.

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:47 am
by ill electro
ROLAND JUNO 60 OR JUNO 106... ID GO WITH 60 CUZ THE 106 HAS A BAD RAP FOR GOING BUSTED (DEAD VOICES)

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:50 am
by Yeti
plus the 60 has an arpeggiator which is more fun.....

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:50 am
by tunedLow
I was in your shoes not too long ago. I just googled everything. Went to amazon typed in "synthesizers", used the synth finder on this site, downloaded manuals of various synths, read through this and other forums - to me that's fun stuff!

What models are you interested in after your research? What questions do you have about them?

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:56 am
by Amos
Juno 60 is a much better choice than the Korg Poly-61M... but the Poly61M has an arpeggiator, and MIDI! which you won't need if you have only one synth and no computer but might appreciate otherwise. The Korg Polysix is also badassed.

A few months ago everyone on this forum would've told you to get an Alesis Micron. To be thoroughly honest you might still want to consider it. Can you get one ov 'em for $300 secondhand yet?

what am I saying, go for real analog and ignore the fools and haters that wouldst steer you away from the Truth. ;-)

So yeah, Roland made some nice old synths with a really really good chorus built in... or check out those Korg polys... they all have a decent amount of versatility, although if you have a choice between a synth with 2 oscillators per note or only one oscillator (juno-106 is only one osc + sub + noise, I think), you'll get more groovy sonic potential from having the second oscillator.

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:08 am
by psiapir
Yeah, if you can find a Polysix below 300$.. Indeed, knobby box with sheer power, but I'm kinda reluctant to recommend that one in respect to your musical preference. As others say, Juno-series are worth a look: rather cheap, reliable (somewhat untrue with Juno106 in that case), quite versatile and a great vantage point for learning subtractive synthesis... Alpha Junos are great as well :D you have to roll the troll Alpha Dial, instead of having sliders like on the Juno 60, sound isn't as rich as on the Juno60 , yet the Alpha has good Midi...
Roland JX-3 would't be bad either, esp if it came together with the dedicated PG... but in that case it would be next to impossible to get it for less than 300$ I'm afraid.. Or maybe a D50?...
hmm.. just browse through this webpage and look for 'related synths' tab... you get extensive descriptions, a photo to convey a glimpse of how-to-program-the-beastie......... You've already got some hints where to start from.
'..Go ahead.... Exploah' :twisted:

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 11:46 am
by :||CHAMBER||:
to add a different voice to this growing chorus.

although analog is a beautiful thing and digital isn't/can't and won't be the same, do not disreguard Virtual Analog synths as they are amazing tools for music in their own way. AND for one on a budget of $300, you will get much more bang for your buck- that is, far more versatility.

yes yes, VA synths do not sound exactly like analog synths, but, analog synths cannot sound like VA synths and generally speaking a VA will offer you more options and variety than a vintage analog.

to qualify things. i am not speaking out my a*s like many who would give thier impressions and uninformed opinions. i've been playing synths for more than a decade now. i've owned a large arsenal of analogs, i've owned many VA's. the fact of the matter is that a quality analog synth that will give you the flexibility you desire is out of your price range.

so, for you to consider---

first off. Korg and Alesis have both been making fine synths these past few years. the MS2000/MicroKorg and Ion/Micron would be potential options. (i think used they're around $300) and they are very easy to find.

next up, i'm a fan of the Roland JP-80X0. great sound, great hands on control, much better than a JX and far more options than a Juno. kind of like a digital Jupiter with some added bells and whistles. although it might be a bit more than $300. but this was my first synth and its wonderful to learn on, it makes programming fun. i made the mistake of selling it when i decided "real" analog was all that mattered and came to regret it. i have one again and i'm extremely happy with it.

Yamaha's AN1X has a nice sound as well. plus, its cheap. the user interface could be better, but, its still a decent synth capable of a huge array of sounds.
(also, Yamaha's CS series is another consideration. they're purely digital synths but, some offer sampling and expandability (speaking toward flexibility, a synth like this is probably your best option))

for something a bit different that isn't analog and isn't a VA but its fantastic and cheap and amazing. there's Ensoniq's ESQ-1/ SQ-80. this is a digital synth that is very easy to program, has a good onboard sequencer and a lot of potential. they can be found for less than $200. the SQ-80 is one of the best buys i've ever made. it can sound very analogish and very digital (if that makes sense)

ultimately however the most flexible thing you could buy for around $300 would be a Kurzweil K2000. honestly i really can't think of anything else that would offer you more possibilities. the array of sounds one can produce is staggering, especially if you find one with the sampling option. though it could be a bit of a handful for your first synth. i'm still intimidated by them.

but good luck. there are so many synths out there and almost every one will give you a reason to desire it. but, if you get anything out of what i've written, then hopefully it will be to keep your options open and approach things with an open mind. but, based on my own experience and without knowing exactly what you have in mind i'd probably recommend the Roland JP-8000 over almost all else. they sound great, have plenty of depth and are very easy to get into.

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 12:11 pm
by ridethefader
i second the microkorg. i just sold one for 300. and considering juno 60s and polysixes( at least on ebay) arent selling for 300 anymore. more like 4-500. the microkorg was my 2nd synth and i learned alot of basics on it. most books i tried to read at the beginning phase ( and im still there) just confused me. i found that the best book on synths was an actually synth. if you wanted to go analog and if you planned doing ebay there are some options but you might be limited. an akai ax-60 goes for around 250 last time i saw and like i think someone said above a korg poly61. those go for even cheaper. maybe go to a guitar center and just mess around with a microkorg and see if you have fun on it

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 2:42 pm
by Maschinengeist
I've got an Ensoniq ESQ-1 recently brought back from the dead, now in perfect healthy condition w/ new battery installed. The sequencer has been expanded with the SQX-10 Cartridge. New power cord too. The OS chips have been upgraded from 2.0 to 3.5. And I'm throwing in the rare ESQ-1 Advanced Programming Guide book (original, paper) + Owner's manual (in PDF). This is the metal casing edition (heavy) not the plastic one (later production).

Shipping (insurance + tracking) to anywhere in USA (including the ESQ-1 price, of course): $200 USD

BTW I've got an excellent seller reputation (see eBay for member "muzikelektronix") or here in the "Good Trader" thread in "Gear For Sale" or on our website (www.MuzikElektronix.com).

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 5:22 pm
by aXL
As I once was in your shoes but now being owner of a JP-8080, I'll second Chamber's suggestion - a JP-80x0.

It is a rewarding piece of gear to work with, so if you can save up the extra cash I guarantee you'll need, do it. There's a LOT of features too, so if you want a first synth you could establish a sentimental attachment to, this is definitely it.

Having tried the MicroKorg, I wouldn't recommend its UI if you want to tweak the sounds a lot, but if you can get a cheap MS2000, that should do the trick.

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:28 pm
by psiapir
HAHA, here we go, we've grown up two frontlines now! Both hugely stand for Roland, one team sports vintage analogs, other one votes for VA's! :lol: .. And now for something completely different: who'll suggest something even more extraordinary... We've already got Ensoniq ESQ1 and Ion/Micron? Anyone?! :twisted:

Re: good synth gods hear my cry!

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 11:21 pm
by Twiddler
raradestrier wrote:and yes i was a joking.
lesson 1: don't joke with the synth gods!!! :shock: