painting plastic?

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RedSky
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painting plastic?

Post by RedSky » Thu Jul 19, 2007 8:42 am

Hi,
I've bent a strange little radioshack toy with really cool colored, illuminated panels but I want to paint the ugly white case black. I guess some kind of spray would be preferable for a smooth finish, but what would be the recommended type of paint for plastic? Thanks in advance.

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Brando
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Post by Brando » Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:00 am

Well, here in Canada Canadian Tire sells a whole line of spray paint that was designed for plastic, but I'm sure just about any spray paint will do. You'll probably want to give it a few coats though, and finish it off with some of that clear enamel stuff if you want a real glossy finish
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KLAXON
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Post by KLAXON » Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:00 am

Krylon fusion works great and is made specifically for plastics.
.....i have some things that create and sculpt sound.

RedSky
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Post by RedSky » Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:35 am

That's great. Many thanks!

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hollandturbine
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Post by hollandturbine » Sat Jul 21, 2007 2:12 am

Best paints for plastic can be found in hobbie shops (for painting model cars). if you want to take paint off plastic without damage use toothpaste or if you want to get heavy handed use a grit based polish like for polishing metals like chrome and brass or silver ware. Dont use solvents that will eat the paint and the plastic.

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nogginj
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Post by nogginj » Sat Jul 21, 2007 5:18 am

be sure to sand it with some super high grit sandpaper. it makes the paint look smoother and stick better.

the more work you put into it, the better it will be.

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Post by gojira » Sat Jul 21, 2007 6:41 am

Here are a couple of links:

http://ipmsstockholm.org/magazine/2002/ ... _paint.htm

http://modeltech.tripod.com/

The links discuss techniques for model cars, but the same principles apply. One site suggests using automotive paints, the other regular model paint. As with all painting, preparation is the key to a good finish (sanding, cleaning, masking, priming etc). Also make sure to sand with fine grit sand paper (1500-2000 grit perhaps, or even rub with toothpaste for a very fine finish and to get rid of dust that settles when drying) between coats. Coarser grit should be used at the start to rough up the surface or get rid of exisiting paint in order to provide a good surface for the primer to adhere to. Be patient and allow adequate drying time between coats.

Use high quality paints, automotive are probbaly best, just be careful it is has low toluene content as possible (usually the higher quality paints). Model paints are good too, but I'm not sure how durable they are, since most of the models I have painted are only display and not touched.

Hope that helps. Post a few pics when you are done :)

Best Regards,

VJ.

RedSky
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Post by RedSky » Mon Jul 30, 2007 4:14 pm

Thanks very much again. great responses. Will certainly post pics. :D

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