CB radio mic wiring

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ElGorilla
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CB radio mic wiring

Post by ElGorilla » Fri Aug 10, 2007 10:31 pm

I have this mic from a CB radio and I want to but a xlr plug on it but a xlr plug uses three wires but the mic has four. Can anyone tell me what three wires I use and what part of the xlr plug it connects to.

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desdinova
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Post by desdinova » Fri Aug 10, 2007 10:43 pm

If you know the make of the radio it went to, you can probably find the pinout on google. 4-pin is probably speaker, mic, ptt and ground.
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ElGorilla
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Post by ElGorilla » Fri Aug 10, 2007 10:53 pm

I know the brand (YAESU) but I don't know more because I only have the mic.

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micahjonhughes
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Post by micahjonhughes » Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:55 am

To use an xlr connector you would need to add circuitry to flip the signal out of phase.

Do you have a reason for not using a regular 1/4 inch plug?

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ElGorilla
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Post by ElGorilla » Sat Aug 11, 2007 2:01 pm

1/4" would also work. Does it require balanced or unbalanced plug?

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DX
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Post by DX » Sat Aug 11, 2007 3:07 pm

Hi there.

I am radio amateur so I could help you.

Of course, you can plug any ham radio mic into another equipment. It is not needed to use a balancer circuit, as you can connect any unbalanced signal to a balanced input (just with a bridge between the ground wire and the V- wire). Of course, it will result in a unbalanced signal. AS said, it depends what mic model are you using. How many wires it has? Usually, Ham mics takes the following:

Ground wire (the stripped one).
Mic signal wire.
TX wire (switch the transceiver between transmision/receiving mode)
RX Speaker switch (in some models, the microfone switch is used for switching "off " on TX and "on" on RX the radio speaker.

And if your mic is from a YAESU equipment, it is probably it has two wires more for UP/DOWN frecuency.

So, you need to determine the wires: take a multímeter, set it to Ohms X10 for instance, and place the - tip on the ground wire. Usually The audio signal has its negative on the ground wire. So test the other wires with the positive tip until you find one with a resistance between 600 and 10k aprox (it depends of the mic used). That would be the mic audio wires. If you don't find that value, press PTT, as some mics only connect the capsule when switch is on.

(for discard, think the TX wire gives you 0 Ohms when the PTT is pushed, and the RX speaker is exactly the opposite.)

Now connect the mic negative (ground in this case) wire to the Pin 1 and 3 of the Canon connector, and the mic positive to the pin 2.

Hope it helps... :)

(For curiosity, is it related synth? are you planning handle a vocoder or similar?)=
Roland Promars, E-mu EMAX and some other machines...

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DX
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Post by DX » Sat Aug 11, 2007 3:15 pm

sorry, I just discovered your pic is about the real wires color.

So , you have to connect this way:

Yellow is Mic-. >>> to the pins 1 and 3 bridged on the Canon.

Mic+ is White >>>> to the pin 2 on the Canon.

In this case, the mic has 2 dedicated wires for the audio. Usually, the Mic- is connected to the ground wire, so maybe you could use the black ground as Mic -


Hope it helps..
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