The best synth for a complete begginer? ;0

Pulling out your hair? Don't know what to do or where to go? Ask in here.
Forum rules
READ: VSE Board-Wide Rules and Guidelines

If your Help request has been solved, please edit your first post in order to select the Image Topic Icon to let others know your topic has been solved.
Greiv
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 3:05 am

The best synth for a complete begginer? ;0

Post by Greiv » Wed Aug 22, 2007 4:00 am

I'm a begginer.
I want to buy a synth.

I'm just wondering, which one would be the best. A synth that you know, is not complicated or anything and I would have fun with it as well as giving me the chance to learn a thing or two about synths.

Any suggestions at all?

P.S. I have no price ranges, I can afford anything. I just got a mega awesome job at a radio station here in Toronto, so for a highschool guy, I'd say I have enough money for just about any synth. :D

User avatar
Stab Frenzy
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 9723
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:41 pm
Gear: Eurorack, RYTM, Ultranova, many FX
Location: monster island*
Contact:

Post by Stab Frenzy » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:15 am

I think the best synth to learn on is one with complete manual control, ie no presets or patch storage, and a fairly simple voice structure.

The Juno 6 is the best to learn on IMO, and sounds so nice you won't want to sell it once you've mastered it completely and want to get something more complicated to learn new things on.

Greiv
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 3:05 am

Post by Greiv » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:25 am

Okay, I see. So it's none of that complicated stuff. Are there any other good ones for begginers?

wysiwyg
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 6:30 am

Re: The best synth for a complete begginer? ;0

Post by wysiwyg » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:34 am

Greiv wrote:I'm a begginer.
I want to buy a synth.

I'm just wondering, which one would be the best. A synth that you know, is not complicated or anything and I would have fun with it as well as giving me the chance to learn a thing or two about synths.

Any suggestions at all?

P.S. I have no price ranges, I can afford anything. I just got a mega awesome job at a radio station here in Toronto, so for a highschool guy, I'd say I have enough money for just about any synth. :D
Korg EA-1. Its not complicated at all.

Monophonic (one note at a time, no chords) but knobs for all the synth parameters (not for stuff like midi, tempo, etc.). It is two part (two monophonic lines at the same time). It is a VA and has some basic effects, flanger, chorus, distortion, delay.

It has a sequencer so you can work on basic sequencing.

It's cheap (+/- $100) I know you have no price range. But, if you buy a $1,000 synth and find you don't like it, you'll have to sell it you may or may not take a hit on resale.

If you like fiddling with the EA-1, you can move on to other gear and keep the EA-1. It has midi in, out, thru and will play nice with other gear in the future if you get any.

Just my .02

Shanesaw
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 324
Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2005 9:44 pm
Gear: Ultranova, Minibrute, Microbrute, Spark, microKORG, microX,
Location: Long Beach, California

Post by Shanesaw » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:01 am

I think any of the nord lead's would be a good. Pretty straight forward, no menu diving and it sounds great. Not sure if your looking for a VA(Virtual Analog) or the real deal but for learning synthesis either should do the trick.
If you have a PC/Mac with a sequencing program like Live 6, Cubase, ProTools, etc. try downloading something like the Pro-52. Its the software version of the Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 analog synth. You'll need a midi keyboard and a method to conect it to your computer though. Meh...If money's no object, go get a synth and an amp and have fun!

sheepmusic
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 54
Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 10:13 am
Location: Riding on a CV

Post by sheepmusic » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:07 am

i agree with Stab Frenzy, full manual control is good, patches can give you a good view of what the synth can sound like, but they can also skew your creative vision, give you some idea of what it "should" sound like. with manual control there is no set idea of what it "should" sound like, you make your own style. Ive got a Korg Mono/Poly as my second synth and i love it for that exact reason. I'm looking at getting a .com Modular within the next few years, once i'm a bit better with sound synthesis, synths that give full control over everything are good to create your own style on.
Roland FP-5 - Korg Poly-800 (reverse keys) - Korg Mono/Poly, M-Audio Ozone
Zoom RFX-1000

User avatar
route_electrique
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2007 5:27 pm
Gear: Clavia Nordlead 2 | Clavia Nord Modular G1 | Waldorf Microwave XT (30 Voice) |
Band: waveformbakery
Location: Helsinki, Aurinkolahti Seaside
Contact:

Post by route_electrique » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:37 am

Clavia Nordlead 2 or 3.
| Fact is, your are going to get bent over by a Record Company..... its just how far, how long and if you let them decide to use vaseline or not." -Unknown |
_
http://www.waveformbakery.com [coming in Q3!]

User avatar
23
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 593
Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:19 am
Gear: TB-303, MC-505, MC-09, V-Synth GT, FR-777, FR-XS, MFB: Synth II, EMU Proteus 2500/CS, FS1R, Supernova II, Fusion 6HD, ER-1 MKII
Band: 23, A23P, Piss Ant
Location: West Palm Beach, FL
Contact:

Post by 23 » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:37 am

Juno 106.

It's simple, straight forward, polyphonic (6 voice/6 notes at once), but capable of a decent range of timbres.

Finally, they aren't really all that expensive.

sam
Expert Member
Expert Member
Posts: 1304
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2006 10:09 pm
Location: Europe

Post by sam » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:53 am

23 wrote:Juno 106.

It's simple, straight forward, polyphonic (6 voice/6 notes at once), but capable of a decent range of timbres.

Finally, they aren't really all that expensive.
Perfect choice and a very nice synth that you will keep.

I did... :D
Roland Vp330 mk1.SH101.juno 6.OSCar.ARP odyssey..Tonus 2600..omni.
ms20/50. OBX.
Prophet 5
Wasp.EMS AKS.

User avatar
Box
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 772
Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 1:07 pm
Gear: Roland JP-8000
Roland JX-3P
Roland JX-8P
1972 Wurlitzer Console Piano
Band: Neo Decorum
Location: Land of oscillators, filters, and other really cool looking stuff.

Post by Box » Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:53 pm

Alesis Ion is good; it's my first synth. A majority of the parameters are accessible from the knobs on the front panel, so making your own sounds is easy. You can buy them new for $600 U.S. or used for $300-$400 U.S. Plus the Ion has something over the older synths...it's new. So it's much less likely to mess up or break like the Juno would. Plus, if it were ever to happen, parts would be much easier to find and a h**l of a lot cheaper. But the Ion is a great synth, I haven't had any problems with it yet and intend to keep it forever. After a week or so of playing with it you'll preety much have masterd it.
Image
Help our very own Maschinengeist (Stéphane) by making your next purchase or repair with him! Click the logo for more info!

User avatar
premieklovn
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 521
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 4:50 pm
Gear: T.O.N.T.O
Band: Monomen
Location: Oslo
Contact:

Post by premieklovn » Wed Aug 22, 2007 4:01 pm

The microkorg and its manual tought me the basics of synthesis in a day. Never been so excited by reading a product-manual!

User avatar
pangmaster
Supporting Member!
Supporting Member!
Posts: 127
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2007 5:55 pm
Real name: Nathan
Gear: Voyager, PEK, A6, FIZ, Six-Trak, Juno, CZ, and other stuff
Location: Michigan, USA
Contact:

Post by pangmaster » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:16 pm

I agree that the Juno-6 is probably the best choice for an affordable first synth that gives you a good intro to basic subtractive synthesis. No MIDI, no memory, nothing but a bunch of sliders and some buttons. They sound great, too, and if you're like me you'll be keeping it forever (though you might end up wanting MIDI at some point so you'll go and buy a 106 and have both) 8)
"To be human, to be fully human, is to need music and to derive nourishment from the music you hear." - Bob Moog

User avatar
code green
Active Member
Active Member
Posts: 535
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 6:58 am
Gear: prophet 600/evolver/juno 6/alpha juno 2/bassst'n/crumar performer/jv1010/suitcase rhodes 73/ '78 gibson l6-s/'73 guild mahogany/'69 fender princeton
Band: thermite zapruder
Location: brooklyn

Post by code green » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:26 pm

+1 on the juno 6/106

Greiv
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 3:05 am

Post by Greiv » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:43 pm

Okay. I understand that Juno 6 or the 106 are the best begginer synths. Hows about in terms of other tools? Like drum machines, samplers and seqencers? Which ones are really basic?

User avatar
whiteyhouston
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 153
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2006 9:11 pm
Location: Shame Tunnel
Contact:

Post by whiteyhouston » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:36 pm

Juno 6 is a great choice.. and a keeper..

I think something like an sh101 is also a great fairly cheap intro subtractive monosynth...
sounds awesome, is also a "keeper", and can do leads, basslines and kooky fx, is portable and compact, can easily sync to older gear..

can do classic portamento leads and has an arpegiattor and even a rudimentary sequencer to learn the basics on, which the juno6 doesn't...


if money is no option, I'd go for a classic old roland drum machine..
808, 909... or even something like a 707/505 (cheap cheap). all can be sync'd easily to the sh101, and again, all are gear you'd probably keep once you progress.

Post Reply