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rock/synth song- how is mix and song?

Posted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 2:13 am
by Jaxamillian
Hey all

recorded a new song. hoping that you find something interesting or enjoyable in it. Any tips or tricks appreciated. I'm trying to get better.

http://soundcloud.com/justin-amos/fireball

Re: rock/synth song- how is mix and song?

Posted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 3:18 pm
by Infinity Curve
I liked it. You have a nice voice.

Re: rock/synth song- how is mix and song?

Posted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 3:19 pm
by CS_TBL
First the good:

The composition, singing and overall concept is actually quite well!

The notsogood:

The guitars and singing is well, but the cheap drums and way-too-retro synth sounds ruin it for me (a bit :P). Some moments where the production caught my attention:
  • 0.25 cheap drums
  • 0.51/0.52 cheap pad
  • 1.11 cheap synth brass
  • 1.32 cheap synth brass
  • 3.01 hi hats (left) quite a bit too loud
  • 3.25/3.26 deeper hi hats quite a bit too loud
Whenever I write 'cheap pad' and 'cheap brass', it applies to all relevant moments of course, not just the ones I've mentioned there.

And that's actually too bad really. I'm not against synths, but even synths can sound more contemporary. If I was to be some kinda uber-producer/manager for this track then I'd ditch all the synths and drums and replace them for an orchestral arrangement made by a real orchestrator (so, not just violins for the same pad notes). With such a formula (pop elements and orchestrations) you'd enter Alan Parsons Project territory, but I think that's actually okay for a track like this one.

Re: rock/synth song- how is mix and song?

Posted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 4:08 pm
by blackdiscoball
I loved the song and kind of agree with the person above about some of the sounds. They sound kind of digital and soft synth to me. I don't think they necessarily need ditched though, maybe just dirtied up. Not sure what gear you have at your disposal but if you could kind of reamp those sounds it might help make them sound less computer generated and more real. Maybe run them through distortion pedals, an amp, or a filter on a synth. I wouldn't do anything extreme just something to haze it up a little. Even playing the sounds into a room and re recording them might help.